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  • 13 Nov 2018
    Insulation is a common element found in many buildings – whether they are residential or commercial. They are versatile in purpose – they can act as a sound barrier between spaces, a method of maintaining heat and cold temperatures, which in and of itself can benefit clients in terms of energy savings on their bills. When you combine with the functionality of an insulated access panel, they increase the functionality and make it a choice for contractors. Insulation 101 To better understand insulation – it is essential to know that there are two types to choose from. Open cell and closed cell. Open cell insulations typically come in spray foam; however, due to its application, it has a lower R-value in comparison to closed cell insulations. Closed cell insulations are great in preventing moisture built-up, which means avoiding any chances of moulds etc. With closed cell insulation, these have a higher R-value, and when it comes access panels installed on the exterior of a building, clients want to ensure contractors go with a quality closed cell insulation. While it will be slightly higher in costs, the benefits are well worth it. Insulated access panels can provide structural protection; however, pair that with insulation and coating, then one has maximized its ability to be thoroughly functional and versatile. Why insulation? When clients think of insulation, they do not associate it with access panels; however, they are a great addition to access panels. Typically, insulation is believed to be found only between walls, ceilings and roofs; yet, insulated access panels can be located in the exterior access panel, soundproof panels, as well as floor, hatches that people seek to have an airtight seal. Insulation provides this added support and seal. While insulation can come in a batting form or spray, the choice of application and the added layer will indeed depend on the type of access door selected. For example, if your contractor chooses a drywall access panel, the chances are they may ensure that there is batting in and around the area, as well as ensuring that the access panel is insulated once installed. This can mean applying spray insulation around the panel itself. This further enhances the access panels functionality but also improves it as well for the client. Picking the perfect pair of panel and insulation Deciding on an access panel can be hard – as you want to ensure your panel choice matches your needs and functionality. When you factor in insulation and the type of application, it is important to consider what is the best way to install insulation or if it is a combination of both spray and batting. A knowledgeable contractor who is seasoned with insulation will know what the best choice is as well as the client's needs for space. While some think insulation is just meant to keep homes warm, or insulated – the reality is that insulation is sometimes underrated in their purpose. With access panels, they offer a new range of versatility as insulation only increases the functionality of the panel. Imagine a security or floor panel, while access panels are made with everything from plastic to steel, these materials are not known to regulate or insulate. When you include or factor in insulation, now that steel access panel is insulated and is able to do more than just be a security panel, it is an insulated security access panel. Visit: www.accessdoorsandpanels.com
    113 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Insulation is a common element found in many buildings – whether they are residential or commercial. They are versatile in purpose – they can act as a sound barrier between spaces, a method of maintaining heat and cold temperatures, which in and of itself can benefit clients in terms of energy savings on their bills. When you combine with the functionality of an insulated access panel, they increase the functionality and make it a choice for contractors. Insulation 101 To better understand insulation – it is essential to know that there are two types to choose from. Open cell and closed cell. Open cell insulations typically come in spray foam; however, due to its application, it has a lower R-value in comparison to closed cell insulations. Closed cell insulations are great in preventing moisture built-up, which means avoiding any chances of moulds etc. With closed cell insulation, these have a higher R-value, and when it comes access panels installed on the exterior of a building, clients want to ensure contractors go with a quality closed cell insulation. While it will be slightly higher in costs, the benefits are well worth it. Insulated access panels can provide structural protection; however, pair that with insulation and coating, then one has maximized its ability to be thoroughly functional and versatile. Why insulation? When clients think of insulation, they do not associate it with access panels; however, they are a great addition to access panels. Typically, insulation is believed to be found only between walls, ceilings and roofs; yet, insulated access panels can be located in the exterior access panel, soundproof panels, as well as floor, hatches that people seek to have an airtight seal. Insulation provides this added support and seal. While insulation can come in a batting form or spray, the choice of application and the added layer will indeed depend on the type of access door selected. For example, if your contractor chooses a drywall access panel, the chances are they may ensure that there is batting in and around the area, as well as ensuring that the access panel is insulated once installed. This can mean applying spray insulation around the panel itself. This further enhances the access panels functionality but also improves it as well for the client. Picking the perfect pair of panel and insulation Deciding on an access panel can be hard – as you want to ensure your panel choice matches your needs and functionality. When you factor in insulation and the type of application, it is important to consider what is the best way to install insulation or if it is a combination of both spray and batting. A knowledgeable contractor who is seasoned with insulation will know what the best choice is as well as the client's needs for space. While some think insulation is just meant to keep homes warm, or insulated – the reality is that insulation is sometimes underrated in their purpose. With access panels, they offer a new range of versatility as insulation only increases the functionality of the panel. Imagine a security or floor panel, while access panels are made with everything from plastic to steel, these materials are not known to regulate or insulate. When you include or factor in insulation, now that steel access panel is insulated and is able to do more than just be a security panel, it is an insulated security access panel. Visit: www.accessdoorsandpanels.com
    Nov 13, 2018 113
  • 06 Nov 2018
    Noisy air conditioning systems in workplaces can help to contribute to excessive background noise and can have a profound, negative impact on employee productivity, increasing stress and anxiety levels. It is serious enough for the Department for Health to warn that elevated workplace or environmental noise “can cause hearing impairment, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, annoyance and sleep disturbance.” Companies across the world are now looking seriously at ways to minimise such noise says Denis Kerr Sales Director at Krantz Limited, who makes an informed case as to why we should choose sophisticated air-distribution systems which minimise or even remove noisy acoustics at work, looking at why the right products can significantly help to improve the office environment. In modern office spaces and further afield, exposed ceilings and soffits are a prominent design trend. Whether developers choose to reveal ceiling beams for aesthetic purposes or turn to design-savvy solutions to keep costs to a minimum, exposed ceilings are a thing of the future for modern commercial spaces.   As exposed soffits are now a common design feature in such environments, it is crucial to manage acoustic levels accurately. Without the correct products to minimise such noise there is the risk of creating a harsh atmosphere, with a cacophony of different sounds ricocheting around the environment. The challenges It is important to keep acoustic levels controlled within these spaces, especially in environments where people work. The combination of higher ceilings, exposed services, computer monitors and human voices create an impractical environment, increasing stress levels in the workplace. With exposed soffits, there isn’t a natural method for the architecture to control or reduce acoustic levels; essentially there isn’t any material for sound absorption. The ceiling is completely revealed to the human eye, with its services (the fans, ductwork and lighting) on view they can directly contribute to the background noise levels resulting in a poor acoustic performance of the space. What are the options? Many elements come into play when managing a space’s acoustics, including the way air-conditioning systems are designed. To create a peaceful, workable and visually-engaging environment, the right air-distribution system must be selected. Some environments often require tailor-made, bespoke solutions to minimise noisy acoustics; there are, for example, these kinds of air-distribution systems in acoustically-sensitive buildings such as the Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Germany. A concert hall on this scale demanded acoustically-advanced solutions; bespoke sound control was completely necessary in this location as noise could interfere with the artist’s focus and the paying audience’s enjoyment. But in terms of air-distribution systems for commercial spaces, products such as the Krantz AVACs system (Air Ventilation And Cooling system) keep acoustic interference to a minimum and can actively improve the space. These systems are designed to great detail and sophistication; they do not contain any moving mechanical parts so the systems cannot generate any noise. Through convective radiant panels, AVACs heat and cool without the use of a fan, completely removing the presence of disruptive sounds. All of the acoustic absorption can be hidden within the panelling, and they are acoustically-designed to reduce noise and improve the reverberation time of the space. More importantly, by selecting a multifunctional system which heats, cools and controls acoustics, the occupants’ comfort is not compromised. These systems distribute fresh air around a space, ensuring thermal and acoustic comfort, which is of particular significance to employee wellbeing and happiness. According to the World Health Organisation, it is estimated that the annual cost to Europe from excessive noise levels is £30 billion. This extortionate sum accounts for lost working days, healthcare costs and reduced productivity. Acoustic control is a complete design necessity in commercial workspaces. Although exposed ceilings are perfect for new build and future retrofits and make maintenance easier, it is important to take all elements into consideration when planning an acoustically-sound space. In terms of air-distribution products, there are sophisticated, multifunctional solutions available on the market which, simultaneously, control acoustics and heat and cool spaces. As commercial office spaces tend to be acoustically-demanding areas, flexible, state-of-art air-distribution technologies should be a priority, particularly as they can assure thermal comfort without any unwanted background noise inconveniencing the occupants. Visit: http://www.krantzuk.com
    140 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Noisy air conditioning systems in workplaces can help to contribute to excessive background noise and can have a profound, negative impact on employee productivity, increasing stress and anxiety levels. It is serious enough for the Department for Health to warn that elevated workplace or environmental noise “can cause hearing impairment, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, annoyance and sleep disturbance.” Companies across the world are now looking seriously at ways to minimise such noise says Denis Kerr Sales Director at Krantz Limited, who makes an informed case as to why we should choose sophisticated air-distribution systems which minimise or even remove noisy acoustics at work, looking at why the right products can significantly help to improve the office environment. In modern office spaces and further afield, exposed ceilings and soffits are a prominent design trend. Whether developers choose to reveal ceiling beams for aesthetic purposes or turn to design-savvy solutions to keep costs to a minimum, exposed ceilings are a thing of the future for modern commercial spaces.   As exposed soffits are now a common design feature in such environments, it is crucial to manage acoustic levels accurately. Without the correct products to minimise such noise there is the risk of creating a harsh atmosphere, with a cacophony of different sounds ricocheting around the environment. The challenges It is important to keep acoustic levels controlled within these spaces, especially in environments where people work. The combination of higher ceilings, exposed services, computer monitors and human voices create an impractical environment, increasing stress levels in the workplace. With exposed soffits, there isn’t a natural method for the architecture to control or reduce acoustic levels; essentially there isn’t any material for sound absorption. The ceiling is completely revealed to the human eye, with its services (the fans, ductwork and lighting) on view they can directly contribute to the background noise levels resulting in a poor acoustic performance of the space. What are the options? Many elements come into play when managing a space’s acoustics, including the way air-conditioning systems are designed. To create a peaceful, workable and visually-engaging environment, the right air-distribution system must be selected. Some environments often require tailor-made, bespoke solutions to minimise noisy acoustics; there are, for example, these kinds of air-distribution systems in acoustically-sensitive buildings such as the Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Germany. A concert hall on this scale demanded acoustically-advanced solutions; bespoke sound control was completely necessary in this location as noise could interfere with the artist’s focus and the paying audience’s enjoyment. But in terms of air-distribution systems for commercial spaces, products such as the Krantz AVACs system (Air Ventilation And Cooling system) keep acoustic interference to a minimum and can actively improve the space. These systems are designed to great detail and sophistication; they do not contain any moving mechanical parts so the systems cannot generate any noise. Through convective radiant panels, AVACs heat and cool without the use of a fan, completely removing the presence of disruptive sounds. All of the acoustic absorption can be hidden within the panelling, and they are acoustically-designed to reduce noise and improve the reverberation time of the space. More importantly, by selecting a multifunctional system which heats, cools and controls acoustics, the occupants’ comfort is not compromised. These systems distribute fresh air around a space, ensuring thermal and acoustic comfort, which is of particular significance to employee wellbeing and happiness. According to the World Health Organisation, it is estimated that the annual cost to Europe from excessive noise levels is £30 billion. This extortionate sum accounts for lost working days, healthcare costs and reduced productivity. Acoustic control is a complete design necessity in commercial workspaces. Although exposed ceilings are perfect for new build and future retrofits and make maintenance easier, it is important to take all elements into consideration when planning an acoustically-sound space. In terms of air-distribution products, there are sophisticated, multifunctional solutions available on the market which, simultaneously, control acoustics and heat and cool spaces. As commercial office spaces tend to be acoustically-demanding areas, flexible, state-of-art air-distribution technologies should be a priority, particularly as they can assure thermal comfort without any unwanted background noise inconveniencing the occupants. Visit: http://www.krantzuk.com
    Nov 06, 2018 140
  • 01 Nov 2018
    Moving into a building should be a hitch-free experience but sadly not all building projects are handed over successfully writes Susan Lowrie. It’s often a case of simply a handover date rather than a process of transition where there is a transfer of knowledge from the project team to the building users. While most project teams want a smooth handover, buildings often don’t match the client’s intentions. How can we handover projects better and reduce the gap between designed and as-built performance? From the outset it is important to consider who is specifying the building and are they actually the people who are going to be using the building. Who is the client? Is it the person who might be saying we need a room here, a room there, or is it the person who is saying make it ten stories high? Or is the client the person who is going to have to maintain, use or access that building? One only has to look at a spectacular atrium built for an NHS hospital. A marvel to look at and filled with natural light, but had the designers thought how easy it was to simply change a lightbulb which didn’t involve scaffolding? Hospitals might also be designed for more patients but this at the expense of other spaces such as storage.  Managers don’t see the point of creating storage areas, while nurses do. It’s why a patient room ends up being used as an ad-hoc storage facility. Similarly, we might arrive at the point of handover, but the last step of securing an operator and maintenance manual doesn’t always happen. The handover could well be to the client team who were involved in the design but they are not the actual people who are using the building. So you might end up with a maintenance team who has never seen a fire alarm system working.No one has asked the question ‘are you happy with what is being handed over?’ It’s critical that we look at how we manage what we are left with as a building residual. Buildings that are handed-over may have an engineered design, but then down the line the people who are made aware of that engineered design no longer work there.  So what was an engineered design suddenly becomes a problem because the users want to change things as the building evolves. But the ability is not built-in to allow the building to evolve. A building will be designed to a specification but then you may well be speaking to the owner/manager of a building and not the user. There needs to a smooth transition from design to operation, along with the full support of designers and contractors, in order to fine-tune a building and ensure there is no gap between design intent and reality. The construction industry is after all a service industry delivering buildings to end users.  Visit: https://www.cbuilde.com  
    163 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Moving into a building should be a hitch-free experience but sadly not all building projects are handed over successfully writes Susan Lowrie. It’s often a case of simply a handover date rather than a process of transition where there is a transfer of knowledge from the project team to the building users. While most project teams want a smooth handover, buildings often don’t match the client’s intentions. How can we handover projects better and reduce the gap between designed and as-built performance? From the outset it is important to consider who is specifying the building and are they actually the people who are going to be using the building. Who is the client? Is it the person who might be saying we need a room here, a room there, or is it the person who is saying make it ten stories high? Or is the client the person who is going to have to maintain, use or access that building? One only has to look at a spectacular atrium built for an NHS hospital. A marvel to look at and filled with natural light, but had the designers thought how easy it was to simply change a lightbulb which didn’t involve scaffolding? Hospitals might also be designed for more patients but this at the expense of other spaces such as storage.  Managers don’t see the point of creating storage areas, while nurses do. It’s why a patient room ends up being used as an ad-hoc storage facility. Similarly, we might arrive at the point of handover, but the last step of securing an operator and maintenance manual doesn’t always happen. The handover could well be to the client team who were involved in the design but they are not the actual people who are using the building. So you might end up with a maintenance team who has never seen a fire alarm system working.No one has asked the question ‘are you happy with what is being handed over?’ It’s critical that we look at how we manage what we are left with as a building residual. Buildings that are handed-over may have an engineered design, but then down the line the people who are made aware of that engineered design no longer work there.  So what was an engineered design suddenly becomes a problem because the users want to change things as the building evolves. But the ability is not built-in to allow the building to evolve. A building will be designed to a specification but then you may well be speaking to the owner/manager of a building and not the user. There needs to a smooth transition from design to operation, along with the full support of designers and contractors, in order to fine-tune a building and ensure there is no gap between design intent and reality. The construction industry is after all a service industry delivering buildings to end users.  Visit: https://www.cbuilde.com  
    Nov 01, 2018 163
  • 31 Oct 2018
    As building owners become more environmentally aware, enquiries to convert existing flat roofsinto green roofs have never been higher. On face value this would seem an easy task but with modern building regulations demanding increased levels of insulation as well as practical challenges such as the heights of parapet walls and other upstand restrictions – the entire process can in reality be a lot more difficult writes Justin Pitman of Proteus Waterproofing. Many buildings, particularly those constructed in the 50s and 60s were never designed to take green roofs. Even assuming that the deck could handle the weight of an extensive sedum roof there are still several major obstacles to overcome, but none are insurmountable. In recent months Proteus has developed a new waterproofing system using its exclusive Cold Melt® membrane with an advanced hybrid insulation that enables a warm roof application to be easily installed on a refurbished deck. A green roof is laid over the top and a combination of the hybrid together with the added insulation properties of the additional soil and plantings, ensures that all current building regulations are met - and here comes the added bonus – the combined insulants are thinner than conventional boards which means that in most cases there is still at least 150 mm of upstand available to safely encapsulate the roof around the borders. Such green roofs are usually applied in urban or built up areas where there is a high risk of disruption or annoyance from odours when the membrane is installed. The advantage of Cold Melt® is that it is odour free and totally seamless making it ideal for a green roof. It is BBA accredited to last for the lifetime of the roof structureand best of all, the membrane itself incorporates recycled material making it one of the greenest on the market. What it does is to make available the opportunity for every building owner to actually consider a green roof application, particularly in the light of recent climate change warnings. Every green roof is of course different and will require its own calculations to ensure the right levels of insulation are used but the answer is no longer – NO – giving every building owner the chance to do their bit for the environment. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDvhkiczqYc 
    237 Posted by Talk. Build
  • As building owners become more environmentally aware, enquiries to convert existing flat roofsinto green roofs have never been higher. On face value this would seem an easy task but with modern building regulations demanding increased levels of insulation as well as practical challenges such as the heights of parapet walls and other upstand restrictions – the entire process can in reality be a lot more difficult writes Justin Pitman of Proteus Waterproofing. Many buildings, particularly those constructed in the 50s and 60s were never designed to take green roofs. Even assuming that the deck could handle the weight of an extensive sedum roof there are still several major obstacles to overcome, but none are insurmountable. In recent months Proteus has developed a new waterproofing system using its exclusive Cold Melt® membrane with an advanced hybrid insulation that enables a warm roof application to be easily installed on a refurbished deck. A green roof is laid over the top and a combination of the hybrid together with the added insulation properties of the additional soil and plantings, ensures that all current building regulations are met - and here comes the added bonus – the combined insulants are thinner than conventional boards which means that in most cases there is still at least 150 mm of upstand available to safely encapsulate the roof around the borders. Such green roofs are usually applied in urban or built up areas where there is a high risk of disruption or annoyance from odours when the membrane is installed. The advantage of Cold Melt® is that it is odour free and totally seamless making it ideal for a green roof. It is BBA accredited to last for the lifetime of the roof structureand best of all, the membrane itself incorporates recycled material making it one of the greenest on the market. What it does is to make available the opportunity for every building owner to actually consider a green roof application, particularly in the light of recent climate change warnings. Every green roof is of course different and will require its own calculations to ensure the right levels of insulation are used but the answer is no longer – NO – giving every building owner the chance to do their bit for the environment. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDvhkiczqYc 
    Oct 31, 2018 237
  • 29 Oct 2018
    The world of acoustics can be baffling to the untrained. How many of us know the difference between attenuation or frequency for example? And what exactly is the sound absorption coefficient? Such is the complexity, acoustics is a subject that has been frequently described as a ‘dark art’, particularly when it relates to the application within buildings.  In a bid to demystify the definitions and notations for the non-acousticians amongst us, Stuart Colam, Acoustics Advisor of SAS International delves into some of the more basic principles and common acoustic terminologies. Sound absorption is a measure of how much sound is absorbed by a surface or object. When sound comes into contact with a surface, such as a wall or ceiling that is not particularly sound absorbing, it will be reflected back into the space. This can result in a room becoming noisy or reverberant because the sound is ‘trapped’ and continues to ‘bounce around’.  Excessive reverberation results in poor clarity of speech which is problematic in schools and transport hubs, for example. As more sound absorption is introduced into a space, the noise level will reduce and the sound will decay more quickly. A material’s sound absorption properties are described by the sound absorption coefficient (αs), which is a value between 0 and 1.  A value of 0 means total reflection while 1 means all sound is absorbed by the surface and not returned to the room.  Sound absorption of a surface is not the same for all frequencies of sound. For example, a porous surface like carpet is more efficient at absorbing mid and high pitched sound than low pitched sound.  The sound absorptive properties of a material are defined in standard BS EN ISO 11654:1997. Sound insulation (sometimes referred to as sound attenuation) describes the extent to which sound is limited when passing through a building element or elements.  The associated term sound reductionis used to define the drop in sound level after passing through an element such as glazing, partitioning or ceiling. This ‘single pass’ descriptor is abbreviated as Rwwhere ‘R’ refers to reduction and the subscript ‘w’ refers to weighted (a type of average). In short, the Rw figure is a simplified indication of the difference in sound level from one side of a building element to the other. Sound insulation is also quantified in terms of the reduction in level due to a flanking or a double pass route.  The abbreviation Dnfw is used which means a sound level difference via a flanking route that is normalised and weighted. It basically defines how much sound is blocked by passing through the same element twice, such as ceilings, which span more than one room and have a common void. The fact that acoustic terminology can be confusing to the uninitiated has made it increasingly important for specifiers to ask the right questions to ensure they have been completely understood.  Acoustic comfort in the built environment has become a concern to society and a challenge to designers. The acoustic performance of a space within a building will ultimately have a dramatic effect on the performance of tasks taking place in those spaces. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com
    137 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The world of acoustics can be baffling to the untrained. How many of us know the difference between attenuation or frequency for example? And what exactly is the sound absorption coefficient? Such is the complexity, acoustics is a subject that has been frequently described as a ‘dark art’, particularly when it relates to the application within buildings.  In a bid to demystify the definitions and notations for the non-acousticians amongst us, Stuart Colam, Acoustics Advisor of SAS International delves into some of the more basic principles and common acoustic terminologies. Sound absorption is a measure of how much sound is absorbed by a surface or object. When sound comes into contact with a surface, such as a wall or ceiling that is not particularly sound absorbing, it will be reflected back into the space. This can result in a room becoming noisy or reverberant because the sound is ‘trapped’ and continues to ‘bounce around’.  Excessive reverberation results in poor clarity of speech which is problematic in schools and transport hubs, for example. As more sound absorption is introduced into a space, the noise level will reduce and the sound will decay more quickly. A material’s sound absorption properties are described by the sound absorption coefficient (αs), which is a value between 0 and 1.  A value of 0 means total reflection while 1 means all sound is absorbed by the surface and not returned to the room.  Sound absorption of a surface is not the same for all frequencies of sound. For example, a porous surface like carpet is more efficient at absorbing mid and high pitched sound than low pitched sound.  The sound absorptive properties of a material are defined in standard BS EN ISO 11654:1997. Sound insulation (sometimes referred to as sound attenuation) describes the extent to which sound is limited when passing through a building element or elements.  The associated term sound reductionis used to define the drop in sound level after passing through an element such as glazing, partitioning or ceiling. This ‘single pass’ descriptor is abbreviated as Rwwhere ‘R’ refers to reduction and the subscript ‘w’ refers to weighted (a type of average). In short, the Rw figure is a simplified indication of the difference in sound level from one side of a building element to the other. Sound insulation is also quantified in terms of the reduction in level due to a flanking or a double pass route.  The abbreviation Dnfw is used which means a sound level difference via a flanking route that is normalised and weighted. It basically defines how much sound is blocked by passing through the same element twice, such as ceilings, which span more than one room and have a common void. The fact that acoustic terminology can be confusing to the uninitiated has made it increasingly important for specifiers to ask the right questions to ensure they have been completely understood.  Acoustic comfort in the built environment has become a concern to society and a challenge to designers. The acoustic performance of a space within a building will ultimately have a dramatic effect on the performance of tasks taking place in those spaces. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com
    Oct 29, 2018 137
  • 26 Oct 2018
    One of the biggest problems facing contracting companies is the ability to keep in touch with the workforce, particularly when they are scattered over several sites writes John Ridgeway. It is particularly difficult to know when workers have turned up and what time they leave. In this “Big Brother” world no employer wants to be seen to be tagging staff but there is considerable anecdotal evidence of abuse by workers who clock in late and leave early. As well as losses for the company, employers have to prove a duty of care particularly with staff who might be working alone. Strict health and safety rules also mean that bosses should know where their workers are at all times – and of course what they are doing. Over the years employers have tried different tracking devices, mostly on vehicles but this does not give you any idea where individuals are located. To counter this some companies have looked at personal trackers most of which have failed to deliver – mainly for not being accurate or tough enough to face the challenging environments of building sites. But now it seems, there could be an answer with a new type of tracking product from www.trackmyworld.net which offers huge potential for the construction industry. It’s a tough and robust personal tracker, especially developed for people with equally tough and demanding jobs. Its waterproof built to cope with rough handling and will continue to deliver even under the most difficult conditions. The suppliers claim that it is rapidly becoming the personal tracker of choice for employers who need to keep in contact with key members of staff working in the most challenging and difficult environments. The tracker clips on to a belt or other item of clothing and in the event of an emergency there is an SOS button to instantly summon help. Tests show that it will tell you exactly when your team arrives on site and when they leave using advanced geo fence technology with the addition of real time pin point location to keep in touch and get alerts if speed limits are broken and much more. The device is controlled using an advanced App which will allow an administrator to monitor a limitless number of teams or individuals anywhere in the world from a mobile phone. The TMW GPS Tracker also offers a long battery life and can be easily recharged from the mains or via a cigar lighter in a vehicle. It’s the tough tracker for tough jobs say TMW – and when it’s vital to keep to keep in touch – it appears to have no equal. Visit: www.trackmyworld.net  
    195 Posted by Talk. Build
  • One of the biggest problems facing contracting companies is the ability to keep in touch with the workforce, particularly when they are scattered over several sites writes John Ridgeway. It is particularly difficult to know when workers have turned up and what time they leave. In this “Big Brother” world no employer wants to be seen to be tagging staff but there is considerable anecdotal evidence of abuse by workers who clock in late and leave early. As well as losses for the company, employers have to prove a duty of care particularly with staff who might be working alone. Strict health and safety rules also mean that bosses should know where their workers are at all times – and of course what they are doing. Over the years employers have tried different tracking devices, mostly on vehicles but this does not give you any idea where individuals are located. To counter this some companies have looked at personal trackers most of which have failed to deliver – mainly for not being accurate or tough enough to face the challenging environments of building sites. But now it seems, there could be an answer with a new type of tracking product from www.trackmyworld.net which offers huge potential for the construction industry. It’s a tough and robust personal tracker, especially developed for people with equally tough and demanding jobs. Its waterproof built to cope with rough handling and will continue to deliver even under the most difficult conditions. The suppliers claim that it is rapidly becoming the personal tracker of choice for employers who need to keep in contact with key members of staff working in the most challenging and difficult environments. The tracker clips on to a belt or other item of clothing and in the event of an emergency there is an SOS button to instantly summon help. Tests show that it will tell you exactly when your team arrives on site and when they leave using advanced geo fence technology with the addition of real time pin point location to keep in touch and get alerts if speed limits are broken and much more. The device is controlled using an advanced App which will allow an administrator to monitor a limitless number of teams or individuals anywhere in the world from a mobile phone. The TMW GPS Tracker also offers a long battery life and can be easily recharged from the mains or via a cigar lighter in a vehicle. It’s the tough tracker for tough jobs say TMW – and when it’s vital to keep to keep in touch – it appears to have no equal. Visit: www.trackmyworld.net  
    Oct 26, 2018 195

  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 240
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 683
  • Once water begins to come through the roof most sheds, by the very nature of their soft wood structure, quickly rot and if remedial action is not taken then most will soon be looking for a replacement. Replacing a felt roof is not as hard as it looks and only requires basic DIY skills and a little help from a friend or neighbour. Simply follow these easy steps and your shed will be as good as new. You will need at least half a day to complete the project and will require Shed Felt, Roofing Felt Adhesive and Clout Head Nails. Make sure you also have the right tools such as a tape measure, sharp knife gloves, an old cloth, straight edge hammer 2” or 3” and a disposable paint brush. Before you start clean and tidy up the surrounding area, including the floor. To ensure you are properly prepared for later, unpack and roll your shed felt onto a clean and dry surface. This allows it to relax or straighten after being rolled up. Roofing felt is harder to work at low temperature so try to avoid working with it below 10° or in wet or windy conditions. Prepare the surface of the shed roof by removing any old roof felt or nails. Ensure the surface is flat, clean and dry. If the roof is rotten or damaged, you may want to apply a complete new sheet of ply. Measure your shed by running a tape measure along the bottom of the roof (the eaves), and up the diagonal end (the gable). Write down these measurements (it’s easiest to use metric as shed felt normally comes in 8m or 10m rolls). Remember too that you will need the felt to overhang each gable end, and the eave of the shed by at least 50mm (so you need to add this to your measurements). Calculate how many lengths of roof felt are needed: The felt will be applied in strips, with each strip overlapping the previous one by at least 75mm. A final length sheet will be required along the ridge. Calculate how many strips and of what length you will need. Cut your roof felt to length: Using your straight edge and sharp knife, carefully cut your felt to the correct length (don’t forget to include the extra 50mm overhang at each end!) Nail on the first length: Position the first length of roof felt along the lowest part of the shed roof. Ensure that it overhangs the eaves and each gable end of the roof by 50mm. Nail along the top edge of the strip with the galvanised clout nails. Space the nails at 500mm centres. Fold over the gables and eaves: Starting at the centre of the eave, and taking care not to rip or tear the felt, fold the overhanging felt over the edge of the roof. Fix the overhanging felt using galvanised nails at 50mm. Fix the next length of shed felt: Take your second length of felt. Position this strip so that it overhangs the top of the first sheet by 75mm. Nail along the top of this strip at 500mm. Where the sheets overlap, apply roofing sheet adhesive using a disposable brush. Using a downwards brushing motion, firmly press the top layer of roofing felt onto the adhesive, taking care to ensure that the strip of felt does not ripple or crease. Nail in place at 50mm spacing along the bottom of the strip. Use an old cloth or rag to remove any excess felt adhesive. Continue to work up the complete side of the roof in the same method. Felt the second side of your shed: Repeat the same process for the opposite side of the roof. Fix the capping sheet: The roof should be finished with a capping sheet along the ridge. Place along the ridge of the shed so that it equally overhangs each side of the roof. Always ensure that it overlays the top strips of felt by at least 75mm. Apply roofing felt adhesive to the underside of both sides of the ridge and press the capping sheet into place. Nail along the bottom of each side of the capping sheet at 50mm intervals. And that is all there is to it to ensure that your shed continues to provides many more years of useful life. You can source the materials you need from most local builders merchants or go on line. You can click the link below to Amazon to a supplier that has a five star rating if you prefer to have materials delivered. Click Link for Amazon
    Apr 25, 2018 445
  • Roofs, conservatories, balconies, terraces and walls are extremely prone to water penetration and left alone will ultimately result in major refurbishment. Until fairly recently construction professionals would use a variety of different sealants to tackle an equally wide variety of leak situations, but thankfully science has come to the rescue. There are several companies that have developed advanced ranges of waterproofing solutions that can be simply brushed or rolled onto surfaces, seeping into cracks and other vulnerable areas to produce a barrier, once fully cured, against even the worst weather. Many of these solutions are transparent and virtually invisible once applied which makes them ideal for all types of glass such as conservatory roofs and roof lights. They can also be used on terraces and exposed brickwork helping to enhance the colour of the stone while adding total protection. The good thing is that such solutions can be applied by without any special skills saving householders massive labour costs, but as in all cases, particularly when a leak is at roof level, it is usually best to call in the professionals. If you are planning to do it yourself then make sure that you have enough material; to complete the job. A 20Kg tin will cover around 25 sq metres of surface area depending on the thickness of the coating. Ensure that everything is cleaned up before any solution is laid to ensure maximum performance and ideally three layers should be used on the surface area. Coverage is based on application by roller onto a smooth surface in optimum conditions. Factors like surface porosity, temperature and application method can alter consumption. Installed correctly your roof, conservatory, balcony, terrace or wall will continue to giver many more years of service keeping out the worst of the weather.  If you are looking for such a product then why not check out Maritrans, which is available via Amazon.  Click here for Amazon
    Apr 24, 2018 409
  • It is easier than it looks to build a raised timber deck.  Timber decks can be designed to meet most design situations. According to the Timber Decking and Cladding Association Desired service life options of 15, 30 and 60 years are given in European/British standards. It should be noted that 15 years is considered to be the minimum standard.  For new the NHBC insists on a 60 year service life in accordance with TDCA Code of Practice TDA/RD 08/01. Building a simple timber deck is straightforward and is considered less expensive and more environmentally acceptable than bricks or flagstones. The following step-by-step guide covers and is consistent with most of the basic applications to install timber decking and while these instructions are for guidance only please always remember to check with supplier specifications. Step 1: Make sure you plan in advance to ensure that boards will be flush with your frame. Prepare a level area for the framework by cutting the timber to the required length, then join using exterior wood screws. Check the frame is square by measuring from corner to corner and adjust if necessary Step 2: If you need to raise the frame, cut four blocks of timber to the desired height. Screw these to the inside of the frame at each corner, ensuring they're flush with the top. As these legs will be taking all the weight ensure you use at least three screws per block, Step 3: Place blocks or slabs underneath edge leg to spread the load and provide a level, stable base if your deck is sitting on grass or soil. Position and adjust checking the frame is level using a spirit level Step 4: Three joists are sufficient (one in the middle and the others at the centre-point between the edge of the frame and the centre joist) if you are building a small deck. Mark across one side of the frame first, then repeat on the opposite side. On larger decks, set joists at 400mm centres Step 5: Ensure that you measure across the inside of the frame at the joist marks before cutting lengths of the timber to suit. Fix the joists by tapping them with a rubber based mallet until flush with the top, then screw them in place from the outside of the frame Step 6: Support the joists with additional legs, spaced at 1m intervals. Follow the same method as shown in steps 2 and 3 for these legs, ensuring each is supported by a suitable block or slab Step 7: For the facing, measure the length of the outer sides of your frame and cut the decking boards to suit. Mark the cutting lines with a square to ensure a straight edge. Countersink the facing and screw to the frame, ensuring the facing is flush with the top Step 8: Now you are ready to start laying the deck. Measure across the top of the frame and cut a board to length. Place the first board flush with the outside edge of the frame and facing, and perpendicular to the joists. Mark the location of each joist on the board Step 9: Mark and countersink screw holes over the centre of each joist. Be sure to use a sharp countersink that will leave a clean hole. If necessary, drill a pilot hole to prevent splitting. Use at least two screws per joist for each decking board Step 10: Ensure you have a 5mm expansion gap between each board (as timber expands and contracts according to outdoor temperatures). Use a spacer to do this. Step 11: Continue the process until you have completed the job. There are many different sources for Timber Decking but we recomend the following link to AMAZON. Click here for Amazon
    Sep 16, 2017 1499
  • Horrible looking drains, manhole covers and inspection chambers appear in driveways and footpaths everywhere. You can even find them in the middle of your lawn or garden! How do you hide ugly manhole covers and drains?                     There are several ways to pretty up these ugly necessities but, however you choose to do it, remember that water utility companies require access at all times. If they cannot be accessed when required they will be dug up and not only will you receive a bill for doing so, you will also be left with the expense of repairing any damage. A much better idea is to (where possible) replace the existing industrial looking cover with a removable recessed (or inset) tray. Then you have the option to either blend them in with the surface or make a feature out of them. Recessed tray options A quick internet search will show you just how many different types of recessed trays are available – too many to mention here! You choose depending on where they are and what material you are going to fill them with. Basically they fall into two categories: Standard recessed tray Currently the most popular choice, made from polypropylene, aluminium or stainless steel and can be suitable for use by both pedestrians and vehicles. Permeable recessed tray This more recent option from EcoGrid provides a load bearing surface that features membranes and a perforated base which allows water to slowly filter through to the drain underneath. Infill options Another internet search will result in a lot of options for infilling a recessed tray. Your final choice will depend on where the drain, manhole cover or inspection chamber is and what the surface will be used for. Here are a few of the most popular infill options: Block paving or bricks These are common choices and can be cut to either blend in or contrast with the surrounding surface. Resin bound paving This is the most popular choice for the seamless finish - created by infilling the recessed tray with the same colour aggregate. You can also create contrast by using a different colour or produce a logo or design in the recessed tray. Using a permeable recessed tray with resin bound paving creates a fully permeable surface. Loose gravel Probably the quickest and easiest way to infill a recessed tray is with loose gravel, but it will inevitably scatter. The fleeing gravel will need regular sweeping and replacing and your lawn mower won’t like it much either... Grass Whilst sowing grass seeds into a recessed tray blends in with a lawn it can be awkward to mow and unless it’s sown in a permeable recessed tray, it will dry out very quickly. Of course you could opt for artificial grass… Plants and flowers Infilling with flowers and/or plants can help disguise unsightly drains, manhole covers or inspection chambers. You can also create a spectacular feature, but as with grass they will dry out very quickly unless a permeable recessed tray is used. Useful links: How to build a recessed manhole cover : http://www.diy.com/help-ideas/how-to-build-a-manhole-cover/CC_npcart_400198.art An overview http://www.pavingexpert.com/recess01.htm  from the Paving Expert. We strongly recommend clarifying ownership and responsibility before modifying or carrying out maintenance to drains, sewers and manholes. Author: Gail Gilkes, Head of Marketing, SureSet UK Ltd. Visit: www.sureset.co.uk Follow us: https://twitter.com/SureSetUK https://www.youtube.com/user/SureSetUK15 https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1220581/
    Sep 14, 2017 2557