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  • 18 Apr 2019
    Technology is evolving through all work sectors, and in particular, it is streamlining construction processes. As software offers ways to gain and store data for projects, and hardware is developed to pick up basic tasks such as bricklaying, concern has been rising over how much longer the human element will be needed in the workplace. Here with structure analysis software experts Oasys, we investigate what the future of builders holds. Worrying over technology taking over jobs It’s a common concern within the industry that technology will ‘steal’ jobs. Technology will not steal our jobs, but just replace us as we shift roles. But how will this impact the construction industry? To understand, we need to have an oversight on statistics that have been released regarding this issue. Boston Consulting Group has said that by 2025, up to a quarter of jobs will be replaced by smart software or robots. This includes a range of professions, from factory workers to doctors, and even journalists. However, a study carried out by Oxford University has said that 35% of existing jobs in Britain are at risk of automation in the next 20 years. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding the reduction of physical workers, however. However, this can be challenged if we start preparing early and encourage current and future workers to adapt to the changes. This could include advancing their own skillset with a focus on how they can do their job better with the use of technology. How roles in construction are shifting With all the worries over technology taking jobs, there’s often little focus on the need to maintain this technology and the jobs that will create. It’s also left unmentioned that workers will need to use technology, and that leads us to the decision that in the construction industry, builders of the future will become programmers. Over the years, we have seen constant changes in the way we work, and the construction sector has been very accepting to new and innovative methods to make jobs easier. From hammers to nail guns, shovels to diggers — and now practical labour to programming. This isn’t a change that will happen rapidly though. Programming is a topic that schools around the UK should be looking to implement into their curriculums as a core subject to keep up with the demand of jobs and to keep up with the constant changes in technology. If we’re teaching young people old ways, they will be useless when it comes to doing the work and there might not even be jobs available that match their skillsets. With the constant growth in technology surrounding construction, young people need to be prepared with the skills and this shouldn’t be up for debate. Like the studies discussed earlier, more jobs are at risk of being lost due to smart software and robots. Workers need to be as good as the technology. Let’s consider this technology. When it comes to a common piece of software that is used in construction, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is an element that can be beneficial, as it allows the appropriate people to access all of the information about a project in one place. It can look at key stages of a project across the lifecycle of a job and provide the information that is needed. This can save both time and money for any construction company and allows builders to have a clear oversight. BIM can help illustrate the entire building, from starting processes to its demolition, and can even show how materials can be reused. Technology is, in a way, taking over the workplace, but in order to maintain relevance in the industry, people must be willing to pick up new digital skills. Sources: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-33327659 https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/mar/19/robot-based-economy-san-francisco  
    49 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Technology is evolving through all work sectors, and in particular, it is streamlining construction processes. As software offers ways to gain and store data for projects, and hardware is developed to pick up basic tasks such as bricklaying, concern has been rising over how much longer the human element will be needed in the workplace. Here with structure analysis software experts Oasys, we investigate what the future of builders holds. Worrying over technology taking over jobs It’s a common concern within the industry that technology will ‘steal’ jobs. Technology will not steal our jobs, but just replace us as we shift roles. But how will this impact the construction industry? To understand, we need to have an oversight on statistics that have been released regarding this issue. Boston Consulting Group has said that by 2025, up to a quarter of jobs will be replaced by smart software or robots. This includes a range of professions, from factory workers to doctors, and even journalists. However, a study carried out by Oxford University has said that 35% of existing jobs in Britain are at risk of automation in the next 20 years. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding the reduction of physical workers, however. However, this can be challenged if we start preparing early and encourage current and future workers to adapt to the changes. This could include advancing their own skillset with a focus on how they can do their job better with the use of technology. How roles in construction are shifting With all the worries over technology taking jobs, there’s often little focus on the need to maintain this technology and the jobs that will create. It’s also left unmentioned that workers will need to use technology, and that leads us to the decision that in the construction industry, builders of the future will become programmers. Over the years, we have seen constant changes in the way we work, and the construction sector has been very accepting to new and innovative methods to make jobs easier. From hammers to nail guns, shovels to diggers — and now practical labour to programming. This isn’t a change that will happen rapidly though. Programming is a topic that schools around the UK should be looking to implement into their curriculums as a core subject to keep up with the demand of jobs and to keep up with the constant changes in technology. If we’re teaching young people old ways, they will be useless when it comes to doing the work and there might not even be jobs available that match their skillsets. With the constant growth in technology surrounding construction, young people need to be prepared with the skills and this shouldn’t be up for debate. Like the studies discussed earlier, more jobs are at risk of being lost due to smart software and robots. Workers need to be as good as the technology. Let’s consider this technology. When it comes to a common piece of software that is used in construction, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is an element that can be beneficial, as it allows the appropriate people to access all of the information about a project in one place. It can look at key stages of a project across the lifecycle of a job and provide the information that is needed. This can save both time and money for any construction company and allows builders to have a clear oversight. BIM can help illustrate the entire building, from starting processes to its demolition, and can even show how materials can be reused. Technology is, in a way, taking over the workplace, but in order to maintain relevance in the industry, people must be willing to pick up new digital skills. Sources: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-33327659 https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/mar/19/robot-based-economy-san-francisco  
    Apr 18, 2019 49
  • 16 Apr 2019
    Transparency is vital in order to maintain positive business relations and to ensure important payments are made without delay writes Matthew Jones. For this reason, it is crucial to have a robust but intuitive payment management system which keeps contractor and subcontractor finances above board and provides both parties with visibility of progress towards payment. Automated solutions such as Open ECX’s WebContractor takes control of key payment processes, improving subcontractors’ visibility of the status of their payment applications, for instance. This blog outlines how digital, straightforward applications for payment systems guarantee clearer visibility across business supply chains. Maintaining healthy business operation is at the top of every company’s agenda, particularly when finances are involved. In the past year, the construction industry has seen a great deal of change in terms of payment practices and the call for evidence. This change, in part, was accelerated by the collapse of Carillion in January 2018 which shocked both the construction industry and the UK at large. After investigation, the construction giant was known to have paid subcontractors up to 120 days late. Undoubtedly, such an event has had huge repercussions on the taxpayer, Caillion’s supply chain and its staff. Carillion’s collapse has even, in some cases, affected the amount of money UK banks loan to construction companies perhaps in fear of a similar occurence. What is the solution? It goes without doubt that an event such as the Carillion collapse cannot happen again. Even though its collapse is a stand-alone case, it still begs several questions on how and why payments were so late. But, moving forward, it is important to identify key solutions to prevent similar events from occuring. All contractors desire a risk-free environment in which their payment processes are rigorous, safe and reliable; such solutions allow contractors to be more organised and efficient with their payments, preventing any late payments from slipping beneath the surface. It is, therefore, crucial to implement innovative solutions which ensure payments can be traced, recorded and accessed accordingly. Open ECX’s WebContractor provides end-to-end management of applications for payment in construction, ensuring complete transparency and accessibility across the supply chain. It is a cloud-based portal for subcontractors to upload payment applications so contractors can manage payments more effectively. As the portal can be accessed anywhere, it is an efficient alternative to submitting paper-based documents or sending applications for payment by emails. Subcontractors upload and submit their applications anywhere and at any time – they aren’t restricted to their office but can complete payments onsite, at home or while travelling elsewhere. Using a system which ensures better visibility of payment applications safeguards businesses and removes risks or threats such as litigation. Timely and accurate submission of payment applications,  means faster processing of these by contractors.. In essence, a solution such as WebContractor removes all the loopholes that a company such as Carillion were able to eschew. It makes for an honest, healthier and more productive financial system beneficial to all parties involved. Visit www.openecx.co.uk  
    87 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Transparency is vital in order to maintain positive business relations and to ensure important payments are made without delay writes Matthew Jones. For this reason, it is crucial to have a robust but intuitive payment management system which keeps contractor and subcontractor finances above board and provides both parties with visibility of progress towards payment. Automated solutions such as Open ECX’s WebContractor takes control of key payment processes, improving subcontractors’ visibility of the status of their payment applications, for instance. This blog outlines how digital, straightforward applications for payment systems guarantee clearer visibility across business supply chains. Maintaining healthy business operation is at the top of every company’s agenda, particularly when finances are involved. In the past year, the construction industry has seen a great deal of change in terms of payment practices and the call for evidence. This change, in part, was accelerated by the collapse of Carillion in January 2018 which shocked both the construction industry and the UK at large. After investigation, the construction giant was known to have paid subcontractors up to 120 days late. Undoubtedly, such an event has had huge repercussions on the taxpayer, Caillion’s supply chain and its staff. Carillion’s collapse has even, in some cases, affected the amount of money UK banks loan to construction companies perhaps in fear of a similar occurence. What is the solution? It goes without doubt that an event such as the Carillion collapse cannot happen again. Even though its collapse is a stand-alone case, it still begs several questions on how and why payments were so late. But, moving forward, it is important to identify key solutions to prevent similar events from occuring. All contractors desire a risk-free environment in which their payment processes are rigorous, safe and reliable; such solutions allow contractors to be more organised and efficient with their payments, preventing any late payments from slipping beneath the surface. It is, therefore, crucial to implement innovative solutions which ensure payments can be traced, recorded and accessed accordingly. Open ECX’s WebContractor provides end-to-end management of applications for payment in construction, ensuring complete transparency and accessibility across the supply chain. It is a cloud-based portal for subcontractors to upload payment applications so contractors can manage payments more effectively. As the portal can be accessed anywhere, it is an efficient alternative to submitting paper-based documents or sending applications for payment by emails. Subcontractors upload and submit their applications anywhere and at any time – they aren’t restricted to their office but can complete payments onsite, at home or while travelling elsewhere. Using a system which ensures better visibility of payment applications safeguards businesses and removes risks or threats such as litigation. Timely and accurate submission of payment applications,  means faster processing of these by contractors.. In essence, a solution such as WebContractor removes all the loopholes that a company such as Carillion were able to eschew. It makes for an honest, healthier and more productive financial system beneficial to all parties involved. Visit www.openecx.co.uk  
    Apr 16, 2019 87
  • 18 Mar 2019
    There has been a lot of talk about HS2 and about how, once completed, it will help to shrink the north-south divide and provide a much-needed transport spine across the country writes Mark Tomlin, CEO of VJ Technology. However, if recent reports are to be believed government sources are claiming that there is talk of cancelling HS2 in its entirety, despite the fact that groundworks have started and considerable time and money have been invested in design, tendering and feasibility. So, what’s the reality – does the UK need a north-south high-speed rail link or is it just financial folly? High Speed 2 (HS2) is a high-speed railway which, once completed, will directly connect London, Birmingham, the East Midlands, Leeds and Manchester. Scheduled to open in phases between 2026 and 2033, high-speed trains will travel up to 400 km/h on 330 miles of track. One of the largest civil engineering projects currently being undertaken in Europe, a recent episode of Dispatches on Channel 4 focussed on the financial viability of the project with it quoting sources within the government who warn that the cost may soon be considered so high that the entire project may be cancelled. One possible scenario of the project being terminated once the first stretch of the new line reaches Birmingham was also presented. The programme claimed industry sources have stated that the project cost could reach a staggering £100bn, substantially up from both 2011's initial estimate of £33bn and today's £56bn promise. More worrying is that in a poll by the programme two-thirds of rail users in the north stated they would rather see the money invested in regional rail. Understandably, for many commuters, local links are more important than another, faster, north-south route. However, I think we could be missing the point. Yes, the costs are high, but this is a project the country sorely needs. The UK used to be second-to-none when it came to infrastructure. Our rail, ports, roads and airports are admired the world over. However, time has taken its toll and a combination of growth in population and a lack of investment has meant that the UK has dropped down the pecking order when it comes to infrastructural excellence. All too often our trains are delayed, our motorways jammed, and our airports and shipping ports are tired and in need of modernisation. Whilst speed of travel is one thing, there is also the user experience. If you compare the UK to any one of the major international airports around the world, I’m not sure we come out on top. HS2 is therefore a critical part of the ongoing investment the government needs to make in UK infrastructure. It is as much about providing UK residents and businesses with improved transportation, as it is about ensuring we maintain our position as an international destination. It will also be a catalyst for improving transport in the North West as, at the end of January, Transport for the North agreed the submission of the business case for Northern Powerhouse Rail, the transformational east-west network. This will connect the northern cities of Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Hull, etc, and will provide the local links that residents in the north so desperately need. It will also create job opportunities and attract overseas investment for organisations looking for space, skills and connectivity. However, will this project go ahead without HS2 coming to Leeds and Manchester? Very unlikely, as it simply won’t be viable.  As a key product supplier to major infrastructure projects, VJ Technology has a vested interest in seeing schemes such as HS2 and Northern Powerhouse Rail deliver. However, it is more than that. Personally, I would like to see projects such as this succeed as I believe they are important for the nation. Investment in infrastructure is not a folly, it is investment in maintaining our great nation. Yes, it comes at a cost, but if we continue to neglect our infrastructure it will have a far- reaching and significantly more damaging financial impact on our economy, our tourism and our global reputation. Visit: http://www.vjtechnology.com
    126 Posted by Talk. Build
  • There has been a lot of talk about HS2 and about how, once completed, it will help to shrink the north-south divide and provide a much-needed transport spine across the country writes Mark Tomlin, CEO of VJ Technology. However, if recent reports are to be believed government sources are claiming that there is talk of cancelling HS2 in its entirety, despite the fact that groundworks have started and considerable time and money have been invested in design, tendering and feasibility. So, what’s the reality – does the UK need a north-south high-speed rail link or is it just financial folly? High Speed 2 (HS2) is a high-speed railway which, once completed, will directly connect London, Birmingham, the East Midlands, Leeds and Manchester. Scheduled to open in phases between 2026 and 2033, high-speed trains will travel up to 400 km/h on 330 miles of track. One of the largest civil engineering projects currently being undertaken in Europe, a recent episode of Dispatches on Channel 4 focussed on the financial viability of the project with it quoting sources within the government who warn that the cost may soon be considered so high that the entire project may be cancelled. One possible scenario of the project being terminated once the first stretch of the new line reaches Birmingham was also presented. The programme claimed industry sources have stated that the project cost could reach a staggering £100bn, substantially up from both 2011's initial estimate of £33bn and today's £56bn promise. More worrying is that in a poll by the programme two-thirds of rail users in the north stated they would rather see the money invested in regional rail. Understandably, for many commuters, local links are more important than another, faster, north-south route. However, I think we could be missing the point. Yes, the costs are high, but this is a project the country sorely needs. The UK used to be second-to-none when it came to infrastructure. Our rail, ports, roads and airports are admired the world over. However, time has taken its toll and a combination of growth in population and a lack of investment has meant that the UK has dropped down the pecking order when it comes to infrastructural excellence. All too often our trains are delayed, our motorways jammed, and our airports and shipping ports are tired and in need of modernisation. Whilst speed of travel is one thing, there is also the user experience. If you compare the UK to any one of the major international airports around the world, I’m not sure we come out on top. HS2 is therefore a critical part of the ongoing investment the government needs to make in UK infrastructure. It is as much about providing UK residents and businesses with improved transportation, as it is about ensuring we maintain our position as an international destination. It will also be a catalyst for improving transport in the North West as, at the end of January, Transport for the North agreed the submission of the business case for Northern Powerhouse Rail, the transformational east-west network. This will connect the northern cities of Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Hull, etc, and will provide the local links that residents in the north so desperately need. It will also create job opportunities and attract overseas investment for organisations looking for space, skills and connectivity. However, will this project go ahead without HS2 coming to Leeds and Manchester? Very unlikely, as it simply won’t be viable.  As a key product supplier to major infrastructure projects, VJ Technology has a vested interest in seeing schemes such as HS2 and Northern Powerhouse Rail deliver. However, it is more than that. Personally, I would like to see projects such as this succeed as I believe they are important for the nation. Investment in infrastructure is not a folly, it is investment in maintaining our great nation. Yes, it comes at a cost, but if we continue to neglect our infrastructure it will have a far- reaching and significantly more damaging financial impact on our economy, our tourism and our global reputation. Visit: http://www.vjtechnology.com
    Mar 18, 2019 126

  • For your convenience we have listed 10 of the best “How to plaster a wall” blogs and guides and as we have no affiliations to any individual suppliers, it is for you to decide what works for you. Building Materials Company One of the better guides showing how to plaster a wall in nine easy steps  https://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/knowledge/how-to-plaster-a-wall       2. British Gypsum As one of the country’s leading manufacturers this How to guide is obviously aimed at its own products but also gives a more general guide to all types of plastering and may be better suited to the beginner. https://www.british-gypsum.com/product-range/plaster-products/how-to-plaster         3. Homebuilding and Renovating This is a more interesting guide as it tries to give useful tips covering a range of different plastering challenges. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/plastering-walls          4. DIY Doctor This website readily acknowledges that plastering can be difficult but concentrates on the finished job, the actual final coat or skim, which obviously has to look flat on completion. https://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/skim.htm           5. Dave’s Tips We like this site as it really tries to appeal to the beginner. Dave is an experienced plasterer and reckons it’s easy – but then it probably is for him. https://www.davesdiytips.com/plastering-for-beginners            6. Able Skills This is a site that assume you have never plastered a wall before and really does get down to the basics. We all know of course it’s not as easy as it’s made out – but well worth a look. https://www.ableskills.co.uk/blog/tutorials/how-to-apply-your-first-coat-of-plaster          7. Real Homes This is advice for those of us who live in old homes. Plastering is a more of a challenge in such buildings and this is where you will get the best tips if you have an older property. https://www.realhomes.com/advice/plaster-in-old-homes          8. The Spruce Keeping on the theme of old homes The Spruce takes it one stage further by discussing plaster and lath. If your home features such walls and ceilings then this is for you. https://www.thespruce.com/plaster-and-lath-came-before-drywall-1822861             9. Artex Ltd Probably one of the biggest plastering challenges and a throwback to all those 80’s style properties this How to guide shows you the best way to plaster over Artex. Good luck. https://www.artexltd.com/repair-hub/plastering-over-artex             10. Dummies Finally in our top 10 and the one that most find easier is a guide to how to repair cracks. These easy to follow instructions are worth a look. https://www.dummies.com/home-garden/walls-ceilings/how-to-fix-small-cracks-in-plaster
    Dec 13, 2018 305
  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 456
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 950
  • The resin-based system was one of 50 shortlisted finalists in this year’s Tomorrow’s Contract Floor (TCF) Awards, which honour the best products and services in the construction industry. The winner was decided by an online poll, with Sika ComfortFloor® gaining an extremely creditable third place. Pete Hollingworth Business Unit Manager for Sika Flooring in the UK said: “This result is a superb endorsement of ComfortFloor®’s proven properties as a safe, durable flooring solution for a range of hygiene-critical applications including schools, hospitals and kitchens through to education facilities or office and retail spaces looking for something which can be tailored to bespoke design schemes.” Shortlisted products in the TCF Awards, now in their eighth year, were selected for their innovation, ease of installation, safety, style, and sustainable qualities. Pete added: "Sika ComfortFloor® is a triumph of technical innovation. It’s proof of the company’s drive to develop flooring systems which simplify the installation process without compromising quality. Congratulations to all those involved in the creation and promotion of this exemplary system."  
    Apr 11, 2019 14
  • This prestigious event will be held at the Mercure Manchester Piccadilly Hotel, with the conference covering a wide range of industry related topics from regulatory reform to mental health in construction, along with a detailed technical programme that aims to promote debate and challenge convention. The conference is delighted to welcome back the Reverend Kevin Fear on day two with his keynote address, Mental Health in Construction – What can we do to improve it? Rev Fear is sure to impress again following the phenomenal response from last year’s attendees when he delivered his session on Professional Responsibility and Construction Ethics. The comprehensive exhibition will be populated with a variety of businesses showcasing many innovative products and services. The Built Environment Awards will also be presented at the Conference black-tie gala dinner. The awards are a chance to highlight excellence and details on how to enter can be found at, https://www.cbuilde.com//awards/ The event is a must for all Building Professionals. Representing excellent value for money, the event is priced at only £325 + VAT (CABE Members) £375 + VAT (Non-Members) for the full two day residential package. Those booking before 31May 2019 are eligible for a 10% early bird discount. For more information about CABE’s Annual Conference and Exhibition taking place at the Mercure Manchester Piccadilly Hotel on 03-04 October 2019, visit www.cbuilde.com/events/annual-conference-and-exhibition-2019/ If you are interested in exhibiting at our conference please contact Kirri Porter-White on 01604 404121 or email kirri.porter-white@cbuilde.com
    Apr 02, 2019 48
  • Launched in 2004, the awards ‘celebrate the best in architecture’ by acknowledging the practices responsible for the most outstanding body of work in the UK. This year’s event includes 18 categories, with Recticel sponsoring the ‘Housing Architect of the Year’ award. Laura Katon, Recticel’s House Building Manager for the Southern Region, who will be attending the awards, said: “We are delighted to lend our support to these superb awards. They highlight the wonderful work of some very talented architects. As innovators of high-performance insulation solutions, Recticel recognises the awards’ commitment to celebrating new and exciting developments in building design.” The entry date for this year’s awards has now closed and a shortlist of finalists has been drawn-up in each category. The winners will be announced at a presentation event on Wednesday, May 1st at the Park Plaza Hotel in London. Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Mar 29, 2019 38
  • SAS International was selected for its unique SAS740i linear ceiling solution with integrated lighting, which cannot be found anywhere else. This ceiling design, characterised by floating rafts, dominated the entire atrium space. Suspended within this area, the black and white SAS740i rafts were suspended 20m below the glass atrium room through a stainless steel cable system. Black SAS130 tiles with a SAS-DL perforation were also installed, not only to meet the area’s acoustic requirements, but to add an industrial quality to each floor. Completed in November 2018, SAS International designed and delivered timeless metal ceiling solutions that will bring the building well into the next phase of its lifetime. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com
    Mar 11, 2019 66
  • As the building was an operating school, a fire rated product was deemed to be a sensible option, therefore Proteus Pro-Felt® Ultima Plus Fireguard was installed. To incorporate the awkward detailing Proteus Pro-System® Plus was used. As it is a cold applied liquid, it meant it could be easily moulded. Proteus Waterproofing worked closely with the Proteus Approved Contractor James Roofing Ltd.  to ensure the project was completed to a high standard.  Due to the works being carried out during term time, safety was of utmost importance to the staff and pupils, as well as minimising disruptions or suspensions. Proteus Waterproofing promote fire safe installation methods conforming to the industry lead Safe2Torch guidelines and is also certified with the highest European Fire Rating BroofT4. Proteus Pro-Felt® Ultima Plus is a high-performance multi-layer bituminous membrane system, tested to perform in extreme temperatures and weather conditions. This membrane is impervious to water and will achieve a weather-tight roof.   It has class leading modified bitumen content which allows the flexible membrane to move with the building and ensure long term durability and performance which is certified by the BBA to be in excess of 30years. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk
    Mar 05, 2019 92
  • A major new high-rise development in Manchester, Deansgate Square, features four residential towers and more than 1500 apartments. To meet the passive fire protection requirements throughout this luxury development SIDERISE, leaders in the development of fire, thermal and acoustics insulation solution, its provided perimeter barriers and firestops for installation as part of the curtain walling systems.   Set to become a catalyst for future development in the southern edge of the city, the SimpsonHaugh designed development being delivered by developer Renaker, includes four towers. The tallest tower – at 67 storeys and almost 200m high – will be the second highest residential tower in the UK. The other towers will stand at 53, 47 and 40 storeys high. As part of the façade design of the 183,000m2 development, façade installer Focchi Limited turned to SIDERISE and its extensive and proven range of fire-stopping insulation products.   The four towers are clad with a fully glazed unitized curtain walling system in a geometric composition. In order to seal the gap between this external curtain walling system and the floor slab whilst maintaining continuity of fire resistance, SIDERISE provided their certified CW-FS Curtain Wall Fire Stop System.     Focchi is installing SIDERISE CW-FS 120 firestops throughout the development. As well as being an effective seal against the passage of fire and smoke, they will also function as an effective acoustic barrier and plenum lining.   “We are a strong advocate of SIDERISE fire barriers due to their third party testing and the technical support we receive from the company. This has led us to using them on many previous projects,” said Dave Brown, Project Director at Focchi. “The SIDERISE fire barriers have the flexibility to deal with site tolerances and deflection, and offer our installers ease of installation.”   Whilst specifying the correct product is vital, the quality of installation of a life-safety critical product is equally as important. Throughout the application, the SIDERISE Inspection and Reporting App provided Focchi with an efficient way to effectively inspect, record and seamlessly audit the quality of the installation of the fire stops. By capturing the relevant information on a tablet device, the contractor was able to highlight any issues in need of a resolution.   The App allows the user to easily update data input fields, capture multiple photos for each area or element inspected and then record as in accordance with recommendations, or otherwise.  A comprehensive report is immediately generated which effectively offers feedback on the quality of installation of the areas inspected as in, or not in, accordance with recommendations, thereby identifying areas that require remedial treatment.     The SIDERISE Inspection and Reporting App is part of a comprehensive range of services from the company’s site services team which ensures that each stage of a project, from product selection to final installation, runs smoothly.    Currently under construction, this groundbreaking new high-rise development in Manchester’s city centre is set for completion in 2020.   Visit www.siderise.com
    Feb 27, 2019 113
  • FBP joined the Single Ply Roofing Association in September 2016 as part of an initiative to include EPDM manufacturers and ensure that SPRA was fully representative and driving quality across the whole of the single ply roofing sector. John said “I am very pleased to have been voted onto the SPRA Council by fellow membrane manufacturer members. I am looking forward to supporting SPRA activities and driving its initiatives to create a more productive and commercially successful construction sector. I am particularly interested in how we attract new talent into the single ply sector, raise awareness of SPRA with stakeholders, and ensure that we lead the roofing industry as an influential and effective voice.” John has 27 years’ experience in the construction industry, initially working as a charted architect and most recently as the General Manager of Firestone Building Products UK and Ireland. As well as having an understanding of the key factors behind design and specification of building elements in the context of the complete building; John has gained a full understanding of how roofing components are developed, marketed, technically supported and sold into the various supply chains through his various roles working for a building product manufacturer. Martyn Holloway, SPRA Chair said “I am very pleased to welcome John onto SPRA Council. His depth of knowledge and determination to improve the sector and attract new talent will be invaluable”. Cathie Clarke, CEO said “I am delighted that John is joining the leadership team. He will play an important role helping to drive our business plan and representing the EPDM sector on the SPRA Council. John joins Ian Muddiman (SIKA), Mike Crook (SIG D&T) and Steve Downey (DANOSA) as the four Membrane Representatives on the 12-strong SPRA Council. Their collective experience, enthusiasm & knowledge is a great asset to SPRA and has been a key element in the growth in influence of this dedicated and focussed specialist trade association”.Want to find out more about SPRA ? Visit: www.spra.co.uk -
    Mar 26, 2019 40
  • With more than 20 years’ construction-based sales and development experience to call upon, Donna is perfectly suited to the role. She joins Sika from Building Innovation Ltd where she held the position as Key Account Management for roofing and tapered insulation. Donna, who will be working with Area Technical Managers and the applications team, said: “This is an extremely exciting opportunity for me. Sika-Trocal is a leading light in the roofing industry and renowned as an innovator of high-quality solutions. I hope my experience will prove beneficial and further the company’s superb service offering.” Donna commenced her appointment with Sika-Trocal in February. “The chance to work for such a high-profile employer as Sika proved too great to resist,” she added. “It offers a huge, but very rewarding challenge. I’m looking forward to meeting my new colleagues and taking this next valuable step in my career. I’m particularly excited about being involved with the Bombardier and Rock Roofing projects and hope to hit the ground running.” Outside of the workplace, Donna cites her hobbies as walking and spending time with family and her dog. She said having the desire to improve personal and professional skills is key to career success. “Forging excellent account relationships and possessing good industry knowledge are traits I like to think have helped me progress in my chosen field,” she said. “It sounds old-fashioned, but I truly believe success is built on hard work and a willingness to learn.”
    Mar 14, 2019 63
  • Leading insulation manufacturer, Recticel Insulation has announced two key appointments to enhance its regional presence in the UK. Laura Katon is the company’s new House Building Manager for the Southern region. With more than 20 years’ experience in sales and account management, liaising with house builders, local developers and building contractors, Laura is ideal for the role. She takes-up her position from December 10th.  She said: “I’ve been given a fantastic opportunity. Throughout the industry there is growing awareness of Recticel’s culture of innovation and quality with regard to its insulation products. It’s a very exciting time for the insulation sector; therefore it’s great to be on board with one of its leading lights.” Recticel has also appointed an Area Sales Manager for East Anglia. Kevin Lee is responsible for distribution, merchant, contractor and sales relating to Recticel’s tapered- roofing sister company, Gradient. Based in Norwich, Kevin reports to the area’s Regional Director, Paul Griffiths. Kevin, who has vast sales management experience in the technical insulation sector, said he was relishing the challenge of his latest role. “It’s a new chapter in my career, working with an exciting company with a superb product offering and innovative ethos,” he said. “I’ve joined a friendly, welcoming group of colleagues who are experts in their field. It’s a team built for success.”   Speaking of the appointments, Recticel’s Commercial Director, Kevin Bohea, said: “Laura and Kevin are excellent additions to Recticel’s regional operation. Their skills and experience will prove invaluable in strengthening our building and sales services. We offer them the warmest of welcomes and trust they will enjoy a long and fulfilling career with Recticel.“ . Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Feb 09, 2019 250