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  • 10 Dec 2018
    A happy employee is a productive one, which is why it is essential workspaces are light, appealing, and ideally, paragons of energy-efficiency. These characteristics were very much to the fore when it came to building one of the largest distribution hubs in the UK, which included 13,000m2 of Energysaver GRP composite rooflights from the UK and Ireland’s leading rooflight manufacturer, Brett Martin. . Home to a leading homeware retailer, the huge 111,000m2 warehouse at Central Park in Avonmouth covers an impressive amount of ground. In fact, it’s thought to be the biggest single building in the south west; the equivalent size of 15 Wembley Stadiums. Central to the design of the £100m building was a rooflight solution that minimised the use of artificial lighting and reduced running costs associated with such an enormous building. The specification for the 80mm-thick composite panel roof included 13,000m2 of Brett Martin GRP Trilite Energysaver rooflights to bathe the building in natural sunlight and achieve an excellent U-value of 1.3W/m²K.  For a project of such magnitude, it is testament to the skills and dedication of ‘full-envelope’ contractor, FK Group, and the usability of the factory-assembled Brett Martin insulating rooflights (FAIRs) that the warehouse application was completed within an impressive 16-week timeframe. The FAIRs were built-up using a Trilite GRP sheet (3.0kg/m2) to ensure fast, reliable weatherproofing and allow the highest-quality natural daylight into the interior of this widespan building. “High performance, trouble-free Energysaver rooflights used at the Range Warehouse are one of the most cost effective ways of getting natural light into wide span buildings,” commented David Biggs, Commercial Director at Brett Martin Daylight Systems. “Energysaver rooflights are the go-to solution for introducing daylight into these building types, increasing worker productivity and helping warehouses meet their energy efficiency targets.” GRP allows an even spread of daylight, illuminating the warehouse while eliminating the risk of hot spots and solar glare which could disturb the retailer’s staff. A revelation in terms of quality and invention, Brett Martin’s Energysaver composite panel rooflights are innovative triple-skin FAIRs for composite roofs manufactured from GRP. Designed to the same depth as the composite roofing system, Energysaver's flat liner panel sits flush with surrounding metal panels for excellent aesthetics and a neater, trim internal appearance. Delivering U-values from 1.9W/m²K down to 0.9W/m²K, they offer high quality diffused natural daylight, thermal performance and ready-to-fit convenience for widespan buildings. Science supports the benefits of natural daylight in inspiring an uplifting effect upon those exposed to its rays, particularly in workspaces. Rooflights help facilitate this ‘real’ feel good factor, offering an attractive solution to daylighting requirements whilst providing the required insulation values which allow buildings to meet energy saving targets and reduce running costs. Brett Martin has taken rooflight provision to new heights. How so? Well, it not only designs a wide range of rooflight systems to deliver optimum performance, durability, safety and regulation standards – it offers superior technical support, detailed installation instructions and maintenance guidelines to ensure systems perform as promised, and work alongside all other roofing elements. The use of in-plane GRP rooflights from Brett Martin more than played its part in the design and performance of Avonmouth’s ‘super-warehouse’. It’s a shining example of how a building and its occupants perform better in the natural light. Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com  
    52 Posted by Talk. Build
  • A happy employee is a productive one, which is why it is essential workspaces are light, appealing, and ideally, paragons of energy-efficiency. These characteristics were very much to the fore when it came to building one of the largest distribution hubs in the UK, which included 13,000m2 of Energysaver GRP composite rooflights from the UK and Ireland’s leading rooflight manufacturer, Brett Martin. . Home to a leading homeware retailer, the huge 111,000m2 warehouse at Central Park in Avonmouth covers an impressive amount of ground. In fact, it’s thought to be the biggest single building in the south west; the equivalent size of 15 Wembley Stadiums. Central to the design of the £100m building was a rooflight solution that minimised the use of artificial lighting and reduced running costs associated with such an enormous building. The specification for the 80mm-thick composite panel roof included 13,000m2 of Brett Martin GRP Trilite Energysaver rooflights to bathe the building in natural sunlight and achieve an excellent U-value of 1.3W/m²K.  For a project of such magnitude, it is testament to the skills and dedication of ‘full-envelope’ contractor, FK Group, and the usability of the factory-assembled Brett Martin insulating rooflights (FAIRs) that the warehouse application was completed within an impressive 16-week timeframe. The FAIRs were built-up using a Trilite GRP sheet (3.0kg/m2) to ensure fast, reliable weatherproofing and allow the highest-quality natural daylight into the interior of this widespan building. “High performance, trouble-free Energysaver rooflights used at the Range Warehouse are one of the most cost effective ways of getting natural light into wide span buildings,” commented David Biggs, Commercial Director at Brett Martin Daylight Systems. “Energysaver rooflights are the go-to solution for introducing daylight into these building types, increasing worker productivity and helping warehouses meet their energy efficiency targets.” GRP allows an even spread of daylight, illuminating the warehouse while eliminating the risk of hot spots and solar glare which could disturb the retailer’s staff. A revelation in terms of quality and invention, Brett Martin’s Energysaver composite panel rooflights are innovative triple-skin FAIRs for composite roofs manufactured from GRP. Designed to the same depth as the composite roofing system, Energysaver's flat liner panel sits flush with surrounding metal panels for excellent aesthetics and a neater, trim internal appearance. Delivering U-values from 1.9W/m²K down to 0.9W/m²K, they offer high quality diffused natural daylight, thermal performance and ready-to-fit convenience for widespan buildings. Science supports the benefits of natural daylight in inspiring an uplifting effect upon those exposed to its rays, particularly in workspaces. Rooflights help facilitate this ‘real’ feel good factor, offering an attractive solution to daylighting requirements whilst providing the required insulation values which allow buildings to meet energy saving targets and reduce running costs. Brett Martin has taken rooflight provision to new heights. How so? Well, it not only designs a wide range of rooflight systems to deliver optimum performance, durability, safety and regulation standards – it offers superior technical support, detailed installation instructions and maintenance guidelines to ensure systems perform as promised, and work alongside all other roofing elements. The use of in-plane GRP rooflights from Brett Martin more than played its part in the design and performance of Avonmouth’s ‘super-warehouse’. It’s a shining example of how a building and its occupants perform better in the natural light. Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com  
    Dec 10, 2018 52
  • 04 Dec 2018
    Distinguishing your company from competitors can be a challenge, especially now tradespeople can easily enrol on courses to give their business that defining edge. But often, these courses fail to strike a crucial balance between time onsite and time in the classroom, meaning that participants walk away with less practical knowhow than they had originally hoped. Fortunately enough Baumit, leading experts in external wall insulation and façade systems, offer exceptional courses tiered at bronze, silver and gold level. Designed to educate participants on a broad range of EWI installations and practices, these courses provide vital theoretical and practical experience in façade systems, creating an essential balance between the two.  A true success since opening in February 2018, Ben Warren, Managing Director at Baumit, reflects on the year, giving some insight into the academy’s future plans for 2019 and beyond.   What’s on offer at the academy? Here at Baumit, one of our key drivers is to make beautiful, healthy homes for people to live in. Whether that is striking exteriors or interiors, we provide solutions that ensure buildings are made to last. This philosophy, to give relevant tradespeople the opportunity to create better spaces for their clients, is at the heart of our on-site, purpose-built training academy based at Baumit HQ Aylesford, Kent. Yet, the other element of our academy is, of course, to enable companies to add another area of expertise to their business. Not only are companies providing their customers with the most reliable and advanced EWI solutions on the market, they are widening their individual skillsets, adding vital strings to their bow. As such, the 62 people who have walked through Baumit’s doors to complete either a bronze, silver or gold course have gone on to significantly improve their offerings. Those who finished the bronze course have expanded their practical and theoretical rendering knowledge and plan on returning to participate in the silver course to become a Baumit-approved installer. For those who have become Baumit-certified, on completion of the gold course, they are now looking to work with us in the future as Baumit-approved partners. We have developed these courses to reflect the industry’s evolving diversity. Our programme range is designed to meet everyone’s criteria; whether you are starting out in EWI or want to grow and develop your business to work with one of the largest EWI manufacturers in the world. These site-based scenarios provide hands-on, ‘real-life experience’ in dealing with regular challenges faced by installers.  What’s next for the academy? Looking into the future of Baumit’s training academy, there are plenty of exciting prospects emerging on our horizons. First and foremost, we wish to build on the great foundations we have laid, as the training academy has been an even greater success than we initially hoped. In its current form, the academy is at the stage it needs to be; everyone who participates in the courses comments on how their experiences are unlike any other programmes they have completed, and are extremely impressed with the course content. We invested a huge amount of time refining the course structure, so we hope to continue in this strain to ensure we create the best learning environment for our participants. In terms of the future, we hope to continue to attract new people to the course, where another key focus will be on previous applicants and people in associated trades. We have plans to widen our pool of interest, encouraging the latter to apply to the silver or gold course to become future partners and give clients the most supreme EWI solutions on the market. Another larger ambition is to get the course into colleges, to define a new generation of tradespeople using Baumit’s application and products. Although this will take some time and investment, one day we hope to teach students a new way to hone their skills, inspiring future generations of EWI installers. Lastly, we have to give attention where it is due to course leader Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit. With 30 experience working as a contractor, Chris has been at Baumit since March 2017 and is a crucial part of the training academy. His expertise, experience, and constructive teaching techniques are second to none, where his involvement has been hugely instrumental in the current success of the training academy. This year has been fantastic for the Baumit Training Academy. We have developed and grown as an educational hub and are glad to be offering some of the best EWI courses in the UK, which will hopefully continue to be a success throughout 2019 and well into the future. For more information on Baumit Training Academy see: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    186 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Distinguishing your company from competitors can be a challenge, especially now tradespeople can easily enrol on courses to give their business that defining edge. But often, these courses fail to strike a crucial balance between time onsite and time in the classroom, meaning that participants walk away with less practical knowhow than they had originally hoped. Fortunately enough Baumit, leading experts in external wall insulation and façade systems, offer exceptional courses tiered at bronze, silver and gold level. Designed to educate participants on a broad range of EWI installations and practices, these courses provide vital theoretical and practical experience in façade systems, creating an essential balance between the two.  A true success since opening in February 2018, Ben Warren, Managing Director at Baumit, reflects on the year, giving some insight into the academy’s future plans for 2019 and beyond.   What’s on offer at the academy? Here at Baumit, one of our key drivers is to make beautiful, healthy homes for people to live in. Whether that is striking exteriors or interiors, we provide solutions that ensure buildings are made to last. This philosophy, to give relevant tradespeople the opportunity to create better spaces for their clients, is at the heart of our on-site, purpose-built training academy based at Baumit HQ Aylesford, Kent. Yet, the other element of our academy is, of course, to enable companies to add another area of expertise to their business. Not only are companies providing their customers with the most reliable and advanced EWI solutions on the market, they are widening their individual skillsets, adding vital strings to their bow. As such, the 62 people who have walked through Baumit’s doors to complete either a bronze, silver or gold course have gone on to significantly improve their offerings. Those who finished the bronze course have expanded their practical and theoretical rendering knowledge and plan on returning to participate in the silver course to become a Baumit-approved installer. For those who have become Baumit-certified, on completion of the gold course, they are now looking to work with us in the future as Baumit-approved partners. We have developed these courses to reflect the industry’s evolving diversity. Our programme range is designed to meet everyone’s criteria; whether you are starting out in EWI or want to grow and develop your business to work with one of the largest EWI manufacturers in the world. These site-based scenarios provide hands-on, ‘real-life experience’ in dealing with regular challenges faced by installers.  What’s next for the academy? Looking into the future of Baumit’s training academy, there are plenty of exciting prospects emerging on our horizons. First and foremost, we wish to build on the great foundations we have laid, as the training academy has been an even greater success than we initially hoped. In its current form, the academy is at the stage it needs to be; everyone who participates in the courses comments on how their experiences are unlike any other programmes they have completed, and are extremely impressed with the course content. We invested a huge amount of time refining the course structure, so we hope to continue in this strain to ensure we create the best learning environment for our participants. In terms of the future, we hope to continue to attract new people to the course, where another key focus will be on previous applicants and people in associated trades. We have plans to widen our pool of interest, encouraging the latter to apply to the silver or gold course to become future partners and give clients the most supreme EWI solutions on the market. Another larger ambition is to get the course into colleges, to define a new generation of tradespeople using Baumit’s application and products. Although this will take some time and investment, one day we hope to teach students a new way to hone their skills, inspiring future generations of EWI installers. Lastly, we have to give attention where it is due to course leader Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit. With 30 experience working as a contractor, Chris has been at Baumit since March 2017 and is a crucial part of the training academy. His expertise, experience, and constructive teaching techniques are second to none, where his involvement has been hugely instrumental in the current success of the training academy. This year has been fantastic for the Baumit Training Academy. We have developed and grown as an educational hub and are glad to be offering some of the best EWI courses in the UK, which will hopefully continue to be a success throughout 2019 and well into the future. For more information on Baumit Training Academy see: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    Dec 04, 2018 186
  • 03 Dec 2018
    Since the construction giant Carillion’s liquidation at the beginning of the year, the government has released regulations to target late payers in the public sector in an attempt to resolve the delayed payment crisis. In light of this government order released a few months ago by Parliamentary Secretary Oliver Dowden, private sector clients and developers have been asked to follow suit in order to assure transparency and reliability across the entire sector. But what are the solutions to stop delayed payments from occuring? Matthew Jones, CEO of Open ECX, discusses how the industry might tackle this issue collectively to put better payment processes into practice. Recent government intervention in lieu of Carillion’s collapse exemplifies how much of a grave inconvenience delayed payments can be, especially if left unresolved. In effect, government measures will make it easier for subcontractors to report poor payment methods to the authorities. In an ideal world, no business wants to add to the stress already evident during the invoice and payment process, whether large or small scale. Although delayed payments can occur for a variety of reasons, whether related to unsolicited administrative errors or employee illness, contractors should still strive to make the subcontractor payment process as easy and straightforward as possible. In order to prevent late payments, the government will offer advisory, constructive workshops to help companies with their project management and payment plans. Solutions such as these should help prevent any delayed payments, allowing contractors the time to consider the impact of their delay and providing contractors with helpful advice to better manage their current payment processes. Overall, this initiative will ensure employees and businesses will not suffer as a consequence.   Even though the Carillion collapse is a stand-alone case, nonetheless, it begs several questions on how and why payments were so late. But moving forward, it is important to identify key solutions to prevent further financial catastrophes from occuring. All contractors desire a risk-free environment in which their payment processes are rigorous, safe and reliable; such solutions allow contractors to be more organised and efficient with their payments, preventing any late payments from slipping beneath the surface. A potential solution is to digitise all payment and invoice processes so that contractors pay their subcontractors in a timely fashion whilst maintaining a healthy, risk-free environment for themselves. Designed for medium to large contractors, WebContractor is a useful tool which manages the subcontractor applications for payment process, as well as other subcontractor concerns; insurances and bonds, self-billing invoices, authenticated VAT receipts, minor works, work order instructions for example, offering a great solution for the industry as a whole. Subcontractors access an online portal for easy and timely submission of payment applications while contractors take advantage of the workflow and reminder features designed to streamline the management of approvals. For contractors, this is a great support mechanism, designed to enhance visibility, control and compliance of the subcontractor application process, lightening the associated administrative workload. Not only do digital processes alleviate any messy paperwork from mounting up, they ensure both contractor and subcontractor are kept up to date with payments and invoices.  Contractors benefit from increased efficiencies, improved clarity around cash flow, and a far more accurate understanding of their liabilities at any given time. Potential risks, such as litigation, can be potentially avoided, as a thorough, reliable system such as WebContractor has been employed. Subcontractors gain visibility of the progress of their various applications for payment – something that will help them with their business planning. Applications for payment are securely stored for subcontractors and contractors to access payment applications at any given time. Time is always of the essence especially in terms of managing cash flow, meaning digital platforms are a sensible and necessary solution to combating late payments. With the right technology, processes associated with applications for payment can become efficient, standardised, transparent and quick. Most importantly, the automation of these processes can allow for tracking and management across the whole supply chain, which reduces risk and helps to build a clear and transparent picture of the finances affecting the business. Digitised systems for management of subcontractor invoices are the solution to stop late payments from occuring. Whilst the government’s recent measures must be recognised as offering an opportunity for both the public and private sector to push for change in the industry, services such as WebContractor are a tangible, accessible method to ensure contractors keep on top of the multiple payments they have to process each month. Given subcontractors can send payment applications directly, without the need for manual submissions, it improves accuracy, hastens the process and eliminates time costs as well as lost paperwork. Enhancing methods for managing applications for payment across the sector will benefit the industry’s credibility plus the health of all businesses operating within the sector. Even though it was a dark time for the construction industry, many positive lessons for the future can be learnt from Carillion’s collapse. Seeing the implementation of government intervention signifies the level of support it is willing to give the industry. But internal measures must also be taken by the industry itself, where digital application for payment and subcontractor management platforms are a worthy solution. Not only do these systems ensure subcontractors get paid on time, they reduce risk to contractors’ businesses. Turning to more rigorous, digital payment processes will preserve contractor and subcontractor integrity and the wider construction industry as a whole. Visit:  www.openecx.co.uk  
    131 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Since the construction giant Carillion’s liquidation at the beginning of the year, the government has released regulations to target late payers in the public sector in an attempt to resolve the delayed payment crisis. In light of this government order released a few months ago by Parliamentary Secretary Oliver Dowden, private sector clients and developers have been asked to follow suit in order to assure transparency and reliability across the entire sector. But what are the solutions to stop delayed payments from occuring? Matthew Jones, CEO of Open ECX, discusses how the industry might tackle this issue collectively to put better payment processes into practice. Recent government intervention in lieu of Carillion’s collapse exemplifies how much of a grave inconvenience delayed payments can be, especially if left unresolved. In effect, government measures will make it easier for subcontractors to report poor payment methods to the authorities. In an ideal world, no business wants to add to the stress already evident during the invoice and payment process, whether large or small scale. Although delayed payments can occur for a variety of reasons, whether related to unsolicited administrative errors or employee illness, contractors should still strive to make the subcontractor payment process as easy and straightforward as possible. In order to prevent late payments, the government will offer advisory, constructive workshops to help companies with their project management and payment plans. Solutions such as these should help prevent any delayed payments, allowing contractors the time to consider the impact of their delay and providing contractors with helpful advice to better manage their current payment processes. Overall, this initiative will ensure employees and businesses will not suffer as a consequence.   Even though the Carillion collapse is a stand-alone case, nonetheless, it begs several questions on how and why payments were so late. But moving forward, it is important to identify key solutions to prevent further financial catastrophes from occuring. All contractors desire a risk-free environment in which their payment processes are rigorous, safe and reliable; such solutions allow contractors to be more organised and efficient with their payments, preventing any late payments from slipping beneath the surface. A potential solution is to digitise all payment and invoice processes so that contractors pay their subcontractors in a timely fashion whilst maintaining a healthy, risk-free environment for themselves. Designed for medium to large contractors, WebContractor is a useful tool which manages the subcontractor applications for payment process, as well as other subcontractor concerns; insurances and bonds, self-billing invoices, authenticated VAT receipts, minor works, work order instructions for example, offering a great solution for the industry as a whole. Subcontractors access an online portal for easy and timely submission of payment applications while contractors take advantage of the workflow and reminder features designed to streamline the management of approvals. For contractors, this is a great support mechanism, designed to enhance visibility, control and compliance of the subcontractor application process, lightening the associated administrative workload. Not only do digital processes alleviate any messy paperwork from mounting up, they ensure both contractor and subcontractor are kept up to date with payments and invoices.  Contractors benefit from increased efficiencies, improved clarity around cash flow, and a far more accurate understanding of their liabilities at any given time. Potential risks, such as litigation, can be potentially avoided, as a thorough, reliable system such as WebContractor has been employed. Subcontractors gain visibility of the progress of their various applications for payment – something that will help them with their business planning. Applications for payment are securely stored for subcontractors and contractors to access payment applications at any given time. Time is always of the essence especially in terms of managing cash flow, meaning digital platforms are a sensible and necessary solution to combating late payments. With the right technology, processes associated with applications for payment can become efficient, standardised, transparent and quick. Most importantly, the automation of these processes can allow for tracking and management across the whole supply chain, which reduces risk and helps to build a clear and transparent picture of the finances affecting the business. Digitised systems for management of subcontractor invoices are the solution to stop late payments from occuring. Whilst the government’s recent measures must be recognised as offering an opportunity for both the public and private sector to push for change in the industry, services such as WebContractor are a tangible, accessible method to ensure contractors keep on top of the multiple payments they have to process each month. Given subcontractors can send payment applications directly, without the need for manual submissions, it improves accuracy, hastens the process and eliminates time costs as well as lost paperwork. Enhancing methods for managing applications for payment across the sector will benefit the industry’s credibility plus the health of all businesses operating within the sector. Even though it was a dark time for the construction industry, many positive lessons for the future can be learnt from Carillion’s collapse. Seeing the implementation of government intervention signifies the level of support it is willing to give the industry. But internal measures must also be taken by the industry itself, where digital application for payment and subcontractor management platforms are a worthy solution. Not only do these systems ensure subcontractors get paid on time, they reduce risk to contractors’ businesses. Turning to more rigorous, digital payment processes will preserve contractor and subcontractor integrity and the wider construction industry as a whole. Visit:  www.openecx.co.uk  
    Dec 03, 2018 131
  • 29 Nov 2018
    Not our usual kind of construction blog but we at talk.build thought this was a fun event and deserved an airing. We hope you agree What happens when waste management and rugby collide? A kicking extravaganza, as it turns out! Back in July, Championship rugby team London Irish hosted a kicking competition with their main sponsors, waste management experts Powerday. Skips and wheelie bins, all varying in size, were set up as targets for the players, making for an interesting spectacle. If you’re intrigued to see who came out on top, take a look at the video below. Video https://adtrak-3.wistia.com/medias/lu8ba5csdo Powerday provided skips and wheelie bins of varying sizes to serve as targets - the smaller the target, the higher the score. The players then battled it out to see who could come out on top, with each player getting three attempts to build up points. It’s certainly harder than it looks. If you think you could best the professionals, why don’t you try your hand at the online game, London Irish’s Rugby Kick Challenge? Warning: it’s highly addictive! The game is sponsored by Powerday and allows you to choose one of 10 players to take 10 kicks with. Go for the gold skip for 10 points, or the blue skips for 5 points each. Watch the direction bar and click at the right moment to hit the skips. Happy kicking. Play the Game - https://www.powerday.co.uk/rugby-kick-challenge/ Don’t forget to share your score on Facebook and Twitter to stake your claim to the skip-kicking crown.  
    156 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Not our usual kind of construction blog but we at talk.build thought this was a fun event and deserved an airing. We hope you agree What happens when waste management and rugby collide? A kicking extravaganza, as it turns out! Back in July, Championship rugby team London Irish hosted a kicking competition with their main sponsors, waste management experts Powerday. Skips and wheelie bins, all varying in size, were set up as targets for the players, making for an interesting spectacle. If you’re intrigued to see who came out on top, take a look at the video below. Video https://adtrak-3.wistia.com/medias/lu8ba5csdo Powerday provided skips and wheelie bins of varying sizes to serve as targets - the smaller the target, the higher the score. The players then battled it out to see who could come out on top, with each player getting three attempts to build up points. It’s certainly harder than it looks. If you think you could best the professionals, why don’t you try your hand at the online game, London Irish’s Rugby Kick Challenge? Warning: it’s highly addictive! The game is sponsored by Powerday and allows you to choose one of 10 players to take 10 kicks with. Go for the gold skip for 10 points, or the blue skips for 5 points each. Watch the direction bar and click at the right moment to hit the skips. Happy kicking. Play the Game - https://www.powerday.co.uk/rugby-kick-challenge/ Don’t forget to share your score on Facebook and Twitter to stake your claim to the skip-kicking crown.  
    Nov 29, 2018 156
  • 22 Nov 2018
    Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business, writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to unexpected costs to the client. When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not being weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also put on hold. The overall effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers, etc, fulfil the project expectations. Sika-Trocal’s Type S waterproof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses dedicated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. Mechanical fixing has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved application time is due to solvent-welding methods devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding method, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of discoloration using this method. Mechanically- fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises of a vapour control layer, insulation and membrane which is held in place by Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings allow the whole system to be mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide have historically been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new supermarket site where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in just  three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: www.sika.co.uk
    177 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business, writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to unexpected costs to the client. When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not being weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also put on hold. The overall effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers, etc, fulfil the project expectations. Sika-Trocal’s Type S waterproof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses dedicated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. Mechanical fixing has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved application time is due to solvent-welding methods devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding method, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of discoloration using this method. Mechanically- fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises of a vapour control layer, insulation and membrane which is held in place by Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings allow the whole system to be mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide have historically been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new supermarket site where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in just  three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: www.sika.co.uk
    Nov 22, 2018 177
  • 21 Nov 2018
    Colour is in vogue in lieu of recent research into colour psychology. These five points will illustrate how and why businesses can inject colour into a building’s exterior in order to enhance and reflect a business’s identity writes   Ben Warren, Managing Director at Baumit. A colour scheme not only has to complement the space, colour choice is crucial to the people or business inhabiting the area. Whether businesses are selecting their own colours, or have a designer specifying a particular scheme, colour is still an important consideration. The following five points illustrate how businesses can make colour work for their spaces: Signify business identity As first encounters are inherently based on visual appearance, colour can be the distinguishing aspect of a business. Although there is a huge weight on the importance of colour, it is important to not feel intimidated by this process. Choosing the colour or colour scheme which reflects an organisation’s ethos is not an easy task, especially when it is designed to complement a business’s identity. Whilst it takes time to determine a colour scheme, it can be a rewarding process which allows businesses to really get to grips with who they are and what they do. Market business identity   Every colour has the capability to leave a lasting impression. Although it is important to select attractive colours, it is also worthwhile to use colour to market business identity. A clear, consistent identity speaks volumes on the aims, objectives and approaches of a business. Unclear and random colours set a confusing image for a business’s brand. Keep employees happy One of the misconceptions about colour is that it only affects mood; in fact, colours shape our physical, emotional and mental state. Typically, blue is known for its stillness and its ability to affect our frame of mind. However, different tones of blue have different meanings. For instance, a light blue will calm the mind and create the feeling of stillness, whereas a more saturated blue would stimulate the mind. If businesses want to utilise colours to increase employee wellbeing and productivity they need to: assess the tasks of the employees, how long they spend in the space and what they want to achieve in that space. Does the employee’s job require a calming environment or a stimulating one? If they are dealing with difficult phone calls all day perhaps a lighter, calming blue would suit the environment, but if they are focusing on mundane tasks for long periods a brighter blue might be preferable. For instance, an office space would be designed differently to a canteen if the required outcome was different. Happy employees say a lot about the business it is representing and having spaces that suit the requirements, whether within interiors or on exterior façades, makes a clear statement about a company’s relationship with its employees. Get support and invest time Selecting a provider who is an expert in colour technology is a crucial requirement. Injecting colour into a building which houses your business is a bold move. But, gaining the support of a provider who understands the technology and theory behind colour choice is a worthwhile investment. Take time to select the perfect colour. Businesses invest time and money developing and honing their strategies, and the same should apply when it comes to considering colour schemes. Follow the 60 – 30 – 10 rule This ratio is a well-known tool created by designers which businesses can choose to use or not. It just depends on whether some organisations require the added support. To ensure a colour scheme looks balanced and calculated, this 60 – 30 – 10 proportion is a useful device. It ensures that the colours are not out of place, nor are they random. Finding the right colours to complement a business’s identity can be a challenge. However, with the right amount of research, consideration and support, colour can be the defining aspect of a business. Whilst some might choose to go green to reinforce their focus on employee wellbeing, others might stay with more modest tones, such as whites and greys, and introduce a blue or yellow into the mix. Every business is different and that is why colour is a great option – it showcases individuality. Take time to find the right colours for your business and see what differences they make. Visit: https://baumit.co.uk
    181 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Colour is in vogue in lieu of recent research into colour psychology. These five points will illustrate how and why businesses can inject colour into a building’s exterior in order to enhance and reflect a business’s identity writes   Ben Warren, Managing Director at Baumit. A colour scheme not only has to complement the space, colour choice is crucial to the people or business inhabiting the area. Whether businesses are selecting their own colours, or have a designer specifying a particular scheme, colour is still an important consideration. The following five points illustrate how businesses can make colour work for their spaces: Signify business identity As first encounters are inherently based on visual appearance, colour can be the distinguishing aspect of a business. Although there is a huge weight on the importance of colour, it is important to not feel intimidated by this process. Choosing the colour or colour scheme which reflects an organisation’s ethos is not an easy task, especially when it is designed to complement a business’s identity. Whilst it takes time to determine a colour scheme, it can be a rewarding process which allows businesses to really get to grips with who they are and what they do. Market business identity   Every colour has the capability to leave a lasting impression. Although it is important to select attractive colours, it is also worthwhile to use colour to market business identity. A clear, consistent identity speaks volumes on the aims, objectives and approaches of a business. Unclear and random colours set a confusing image for a business’s brand. Keep employees happy One of the misconceptions about colour is that it only affects mood; in fact, colours shape our physical, emotional and mental state. Typically, blue is known for its stillness and its ability to affect our frame of mind. However, different tones of blue have different meanings. For instance, a light blue will calm the mind and create the feeling of stillness, whereas a more saturated blue would stimulate the mind. If businesses want to utilise colours to increase employee wellbeing and productivity they need to: assess the tasks of the employees, how long they spend in the space and what they want to achieve in that space. Does the employee’s job require a calming environment or a stimulating one? If they are dealing with difficult phone calls all day perhaps a lighter, calming blue would suit the environment, but if they are focusing on mundane tasks for long periods a brighter blue might be preferable. For instance, an office space would be designed differently to a canteen if the required outcome was different. Happy employees say a lot about the business it is representing and having spaces that suit the requirements, whether within interiors or on exterior façades, makes a clear statement about a company’s relationship with its employees. Get support and invest time Selecting a provider who is an expert in colour technology is a crucial requirement. Injecting colour into a building which houses your business is a bold move. But, gaining the support of a provider who understands the technology and theory behind colour choice is a worthwhile investment. Take time to select the perfect colour. Businesses invest time and money developing and honing their strategies, and the same should apply when it comes to considering colour schemes. Follow the 60 – 30 – 10 rule This ratio is a well-known tool created by designers which businesses can choose to use or not. It just depends on whether some organisations require the added support. To ensure a colour scheme looks balanced and calculated, this 60 – 30 – 10 proportion is a useful device. It ensures that the colours are not out of place, nor are they random. Finding the right colours to complement a business’s identity can be a challenge. However, with the right amount of research, consideration and support, colour can be the defining aspect of a business. Whilst some might choose to go green to reinforce their focus on employee wellbeing, others might stay with more modest tones, such as whites and greys, and introduce a blue or yellow into the mix. Every business is different and that is why colour is a great option – it showcases individuality. Take time to find the right colours for your business and see what differences they make. Visit: https://baumit.co.uk
    Nov 21, 2018 181

  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 271
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 726
  • Once water begins to come through the roof most sheds, by the very nature of their soft wood structure, quickly rot and if remedial action is not taken then most will soon be looking for a replacement. Replacing a felt roof is not as hard as it looks and only requires basic DIY skills and a little help from a friend or neighbour. Simply follow these easy steps and your shed will be as good as new. You will need at least half a day to complete the project and will require Shed Felt, Roofing Felt Adhesive and Clout Head Nails. Make sure you also have the right tools such as a tape measure, sharp knife gloves, an old cloth, straight edge hammer 2” or 3” and a disposable paint brush. Before you start clean and tidy up the surrounding area, including the floor. To ensure you are properly prepared for later, unpack and roll your shed felt onto a clean and dry surface. This allows it to relax or straighten after being rolled up. Roofing felt is harder to work at low temperature so try to avoid working with it below 10° or in wet or windy conditions. Prepare the surface of the shed roof by removing any old roof felt or nails. Ensure the surface is flat, clean and dry. If the roof is rotten or damaged, you may want to apply a complete new sheet of ply. Measure your shed by running a tape measure along the bottom of the roof (the eaves), and up the diagonal end (the gable). Write down these measurements (it’s easiest to use metric as shed felt normally comes in 8m or 10m rolls). Remember too that you will need the felt to overhang each gable end, and the eave of the shed by at least 50mm (so you need to add this to your measurements). Calculate how many lengths of roof felt are needed: The felt will be applied in strips, with each strip overlapping the previous one by at least 75mm. A final length sheet will be required along the ridge. Calculate how many strips and of what length you will need. Cut your roof felt to length: Using your straight edge and sharp knife, carefully cut your felt to the correct length (don’t forget to include the extra 50mm overhang at each end!) Nail on the first length: Position the first length of roof felt along the lowest part of the shed roof. Ensure that it overhangs the eaves and each gable end of the roof by 50mm. Nail along the top edge of the strip with the galvanised clout nails. Space the nails at 500mm centres. Fold over the gables and eaves: Starting at the centre of the eave, and taking care not to rip or tear the felt, fold the overhanging felt over the edge of the roof. Fix the overhanging felt using galvanised nails at 50mm. Fix the next length of shed felt: Take your second length of felt. Position this strip so that it overhangs the top of the first sheet by 75mm. Nail along the top of this strip at 500mm. Where the sheets overlap, apply roofing sheet adhesive using a disposable brush. Using a downwards brushing motion, firmly press the top layer of roofing felt onto the adhesive, taking care to ensure that the strip of felt does not ripple or crease. Nail in place at 50mm spacing along the bottom of the strip. Use an old cloth or rag to remove any excess felt adhesive. Continue to work up the complete side of the roof in the same method. Felt the second side of your shed: Repeat the same process for the opposite side of the roof. Fix the capping sheet: The roof should be finished with a capping sheet along the ridge. Place along the ridge of the shed so that it equally overhangs each side of the roof. Always ensure that it overlays the top strips of felt by at least 75mm. Apply roofing felt adhesive to the underside of both sides of the ridge and press the capping sheet into place. Nail along the bottom of each side of the capping sheet at 50mm intervals. And that is all there is to it to ensure that your shed continues to provides many more years of useful life. You can source the materials you need from most local builders merchants or go on line. You can click the link below to Amazon to a supplier that has a five star rating if you prefer to have materials delivered. Click Link for Amazon
    Apr 25, 2018 482
  • Roofs, conservatories, balconies, terraces and walls are extremely prone to water penetration and left alone will ultimately result in major refurbishment. Until fairly recently construction professionals would use a variety of different sealants to tackle an equally wide variety of leak situations, but thankfully science has come to the rescue. There are several companies that have developed advanced ranges of waterproofing solutions that can be simply brushed or rolled onto surfaces, seeping into cracks and other vulnerable areas to produce a barrier, once fully cured, against even the worst weather. Many of these solutions are transparent and virtually invisible once applied which makes them ideal for all types of glass such as conservatory roofs and roof lights. They can also be used on terraces and exposed brickwork helping to enhance the colour of the stone while adding total protection. The good thing is that such solutions can be applied by without any special skills saving householders massive labour costs, but as in all cases, particularly when a leak is at roof level, it is usually best to call in the professionals. If you are planning to do it yourself then make sure that you have enough material; to complete the job. A 20Kg tin will cover around 25 sq metres of surface area depending on the thickness of the coating. Ensure that everything is cleaned up before any solution is laid to ensure maximum performance and ideally three layers should be used on the surface area. Coverage is based on application by roller onto a smooth surface in optimum conditions. Factors like surface porosity, temperature and application method can alter consumption. Installed correctly your roof, conservatory, balcony, terrace or wall will continue to giver many more years of service keeping out the worst of the weather.  If you are looking for such a product then why not check out Maritrans, which is available via Amazon.  Click here for Amazon
    Apr 24, 2018 462
  • It is easier than it looks to build a raised timber deck.  Timber decks can be designed to meet most design situations. According to the Timber Decking and Cladding Association Desired service life options of 15, 30 and 60 years are given in European/British standards. It should be noted that 15 years is considered to be the minimum standard.  For new the NHBC insists on a 60 year service life in accordance with TDCA Code of Practice TDA/RD 08/01. Building a simple timber deck is straightforward and is considered less expensive and more environmentally acceptable than bricks or flagstones. The following step-by-step guide covers and is consistent with most of the basic applications to install timber decking and while these instructions are for guidance only please always remember to check with supplier specifications. Step 1: Make sure you plan in advance to ensure that boards will be flush with your frame. Prepare a level area for the framework by cutting the timber to the required length, then join using exterior wood screws. Check the frame is square by measuring from corner to corner and adjust if necessary Step 2: If you need to raise the frame, cut four blocks of timber to the desired height. Screw these to the inside of the frame at each corner, ensuring they're flush with the top. As these legs will be taking all the weight ensure you use at least three screws per block, Step 3: Place blocks or slabs underneath edge leg to spread the load and provide a level, stable base if your deck is sitting on grass or soil. Position and adjust checking the frame is level using a spirit level Step 4: Three joists are sufficient (one in the middle and the others at the centre-point between the edge of the frame and the centre joist) if you are building a small deck. Mark across one side of the frame first, then repeat on the opposite side. On larger decks, set joists at 400mm centres Step 5: Ensure that you measure across the inside of the frame at the joist marks before cutting lengths of the timber to suit. Fix the joists by tapping them with a rubber based mallet until flush with the top, then screw them in place from the outside of the frame Step 6: Support the joists with additional legs, spaced at 1m intervals. Follow the same method as shown in steps 2 and 3 for these legs, ensuring each is supported by a suitable block or slab Step 7: For the facing, measure the length of the outer sides of your frame and cut the decking boards to suit. Mark the cutting lines with a square to ensure a straight edge. Countersink the facing and screw to the frame, ensuring the facing is flush with the top Step 8: Now you are ready to start laying the deck. Measure across the top of the frame and cut a board to length. Place the first board flush with the outside edge of the frame and facing, and perpendicular to the joists. Mark the location of each joist on the board Step 9: Mark and countersink screw holes over the centre of each joist. Be sure to use a sharp countersink that will leave a clean hole. If necessary, drill a pilot hole to prevent splitting. Use at least two screws per joist for each decking board Step 10: Ensure you have a 5mm expansion gap between each board (as timber expands and contracts according to outdoor temperatures). Use a spacer to do this. Step 11: Continue the process until you have completed the job. There are many different sources for Timber Decking but we recomend the following link to AMAZON. Click here for Amazon
    Sep 16, 2017 1524
  • Horrible looking drains, manhole covers and inspection chambers appear in driveways and footpaths everywhere. You can even find them in the middle of your lawn or garden! How do you hide ugly manhole covers and drains?                     There are several ways to pretty up these ugly necessities but, however you choose to do it, remember that water utility companies require access at all times. If they cannot be accessed when required they will be dug up and not only will you receive a bill for doing so, you will also be left with the expense of repairing any damage. A much better idea is to (where possible) replace the existing industrial looking cover with a removable recessed (or inset) tray. Then you have the option to either blend them in with the surface or make a feature out of them. Recessed tray options A quick internet search will show you just how many different types of recessed trays are available – too many to mention here! You choose depending on where they are and what material you are going to fill them with. Basically they fall into two categories: Standard recessed tray Currently the most popular choice, made from polypropylene, aluminium or stainless steel and can be suitable for use by both pedestrians and vehicles. Permeable recessed tray This more recent option from EcoGrid provides a load bearing surface that features membranes and a perforated base which allows water to slowly filter through to the drain underneath. Infill options Another internet search will result in a lot of options for infilling a recessed tray. Your final choice will depend on where the drain, manhole cover or inspection chamber is and what the surface will be used for. Here are a few of the most popular infill options: Block paving or bricks These are common choices and can be cut to either blend in or contrast with the surrounding surface. Resin bound paving This is the most popular choice for the seamless finish - created by infilling the recessed tray with the same colour aggregate. You can also create contrast by using a different colour or produce a logo or design in the recessed tray. Using a permeable recessed tray with resin bound paving creates a fully permeable surface. Loose gravel Probably the quickest and easiest way to infill a recessed tray is with loose gravel, but it will inevitably scatter. The fleeing gravel will need regular sweeping and replacing and your lawn mower won’t like it much either... Grass Whilst sowing grass seeds into a recessed tray blends in with a lawn it can be awkward to mow and unless it’s sown in a permeable recessed tray, it will dry out very quickly. Of course you could opt for artificial grass… Plants and flowers Infilling with flowers and/or plants can help disguise unsightly drains, manhole covers or inspection chambers. You can also create a spectacular feature, but as with grass they will dry out very quickly unless a permeable recessed tray is used. Useful links: How to build a recessed manhole cover : http://www.diy.com/help-ideas/how-to-build-a-manhole-cover/CC_npcart_400198.art An overview http://www.pavingexpert.com/recess01.htm  from the Paving Expert. We strongly recommend clarifying ownership and responsibility before modifying or carrying out maintenance to drains, sewers and manholes. Author: Gail Gilkes, Head of Marketing, SureSet UK Ltd. Visit: www.sureset.co.uk Follow us: https://twitter.com/SureSetUK https://www.youtube.com/user/SureSetUK15 https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1220581/
    Sep 14, 2017 2671