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  • 13 Jun 2019
    A muddy site, a tool belt and hard hat, wolf whistling, dirty finger nails, Bob the Builder and middle-aged men are just some of the perceptions we have when we think of people who work in the construction industry. Lest we forget our hard-working tradesmen who are up at the crack of dawn laying bricks, but ‘construction’ has way more to it than that. There is no escaping construction. The building you’re sitting in right now keeping you warm and safe is ‘construction’ yet our nation sees it as an unappealing career option, but guess what! I’m a woman in my mid-thirties and I work in construction and I love it writes Kelly Slociak, Head of PR, Fabrick . When I was 16 I had already mapped out that I was going to be an actress and have 4 children (including one set of twins) by the age of 30. I spoke to the careers advisor and my teachers and I chose my GCSE disciplines ‘X’, ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ and off I went. Limited choices, limited opportunities… Did I really know at that age what I really wanted to do, or more importantly, what my best skills were in order to guide me? Probably not, but back then that was what it was. For the record, I quickly learnt I was a rubbish actress, and actually the thought of having 4 children in my twenties meant I couldn’t go out partying, so that plan, to say the least, did not work out. I am often asked how I ended up working in construction and I always answer with ‘probably the same way you did, I ‘fell’ into it’. Just like most things in my life, I fell into Art College, I fell into doing a PR and journalism degree, I fell into a career in PR and marketing and then I fell into the construction industry. And now I am a voice for my clients who want to be at the forefront of decision makers in the industry. If I could go back to school and start afresh, it would be nice to know that construction isn’t just for men and actually there are lots of exciting opportunities within the industry. If I knew what an architect’s role was or a Quantity Surveyor’s role was or what a BIM expert was, perhaps my mind-set may have been somewhat different. So how can we ensure that the children of our future know about the construction industry and actually encourage these opportunities? I was invited to an inspiring talk by Mark Farmer at the Chartered Institute of Marketing Construction Industry Group (CIMCIG) debate last week on the ‘Image of Construction’ at the House of Lords. ‘Young people need to be inspired and motivated and we need to achieve a better gender balance’ were just a few of the points addressed to make the industry more attractive. Farmer also went on to speculate that the term ‘construction industry’ was perhaps maybe now outdated and asked if we should now be addressing it as the ‘built environment’. This is a term, that as an agency, we started to introduce a couple of years ago which sounds more appealing and represents more of a diverse range of prospects. ‘As an industry, how can we change the image of construction? The opportunity here is to be collaborative’ – which was heavily echoed in the Q&A debate from the panel of speakers which included Sadie Morgan of dRMM, Mark Reynolds, Chief Executive of Mace Group, Sam Stacey of Transforming Construction and Jade Lewis of St Gobain Group. Talking to a room full of fellow marketers, Farmer made a plea for better co-ordination, asking for more collaboration to reflect the increasingly high-tech nature of the industry and the solutions it presents to global issues such as climate change and living standards. Training has been neglected and the skills shortage continues so we need to be working together and reaching out to the schools, colleges and the next generation in general to educate them. Yes, we have a massive industry, and yes it comes with many problems, but it also comes with lots of opportunities to tackle those problems. For people of all ages, gender and backgrounds, this has to be an inspiring prospect. An opportunity to improve lives and help save our planet! So now what? They say it begins at home. So, every household with children that owns Lego bricks, I’d say that’s a good place to start… Visit: www.wearefabrick.com
    83 Posted by Talk. Build
  • A muddy site, a tool belt and hard hat, wolf whistling, dirty finger nails, Bob the Builder and middle-aged men are just some of the perceptions we have when we think of people who work in the construction industry. Lest we forget our hard-working tradesmen who are up at the crack of dawn laying bricks, but ‘construction’ has way more to it than that. There is no escaping construction. The building you’re sitting in right now keeping you warm and safe is ‘construction’ yet our nation sees it as an unappealing career option, but guess what! I’m a woman in my mid-thirties and I work in construction and I love it writes Kelly Slociak, Head of PR, Fabrick . When I was 16 I had already mapped out that I was going to be an actress and have 4 children (including one set of twins) by the age of 30. I spoke to the careers advisor and my teachers and I chose my GCSE disciplines ‘X’, ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ and off I went. Limited choices, limited opportunities… Did I really know at that age what I really wanted to do, or more importantly, what my best skills were in order to guide me? Probably not, but back then that was what it was. For the record, I quickly learnt I was a rubbish actress, and actually the thought of having 4 children in my twenties meant I couldn’t go out partying, so that plan, to say the least, did not work out. I am often asked how I ended up working in construction and I always answer with ‘probably the same way you did, I ‘fell’ into it’. Just like most things in my life, I fell into Art College, I fell into doing a PR and journalism degree, I fell into a career in PR and marketing and then I fell into the construction industry. And now I am a voice for my clients who want to be at the forefront of decision makers in the industry. If I could go back to school and start afresh, it would be nice to know that construction isn’t just for men and actually there are lots of exciting opportunities within the industry. If I knew what an architect’s role was or a Quantity Surveyor’s role was or what a BIM expert was, perhaps my mind-set may have been somewhat different. So how can we ensure that the children of our future know about the construction industry and actually encourage these opportunities? I was invited to an inspiring talk by Mark Farmer at the Chartered Institute of Marketing Construction Industry Group (CIMCIG) debate last week on the ‘Image of Construction’ at the House of Lords. ‘Young people need to be inspired and motivated and we need to achieve a better gender balance’ were just a few of the points addressed to make the industry more attractive. Farmer also went on to speculate that the term ‘construction industry’ was perhaps maybe now outdated and asked if we should now be addressing it as the ‘built environment’. This is a term, that as an agency, we started to introduce a couple of years ago which sounds more appealing and represents more of a diverse range of prospects. ‘As an industry, how can we change the image of construction? The opportunity here is to be collaborative’ – which was heavily echoed in the Q&A debate from the panel of speakers which included Sadie Morgan of dRMM, Mark Reynolds, Chief Executive of Mace Group, Sam Stacey of Transforming Construction and Jade Lewis of St Gobain Group. Talking to a room full of fellow marketers, Farmer made a plea for better co-ordination, asking for more collaboration to reflect the increasingly high-tech nature of the industry and the solutions it presents to global issues such as climate change and living standards. Training has been neglected and the skills shortage continues so we need to be working together and reaching out to the schools, colleges and the next generation in general to educate them. Yes, we have a massive industry, and yes it comes with many problems, but it also comes with lots of opportunities to tackle those problems. For people of all ages, gender and backgrounds, this has to be an inspiring prospect. An opportunity to improve lives and help save our planet! So now what? They say it begins at home. So, every household with children that owns Lego bricks, I’d say that’s a good place to start… Visit: www.wearefabrick.com
    Jun 13, 2019 83
  • 07 Jun 2019
    Following a report last week by BBC’s Watchdog highlighting the hundreds of new build homes which are a fire risk, we are once again reminded of the dangerous gap between the expectation of safety, the reality of building regulations and the performance of buildings writes Tom Roche, Secretary of the Business Sprinkler Alliance. People assume that buildings are safe but if a building is built to regulations, what does that mean? What do people hear? Is it that the building complies with the statutory minimums to secure the health and safety of those in and around the building? In other words, you will escape the fire but your property is totally lost.  Or do people hear their property is protected by fire so both they and their possessions will be safe and protected from fire?  Or do people think we are safe from fire but there may be a little damage? The issue is therefore a case of clarity and an understanding of what the terms mean. It’s not unusual to hear after a fire that the building complied with building regulations. The fire may well have been devastating in terms of property damage but it was a success in terms of regulation and we could do no more. One only has to look at the devastating fire on New Year’s Eve at the Shurgard self-storage facility in Croydon as an example of the ambiguity and misunderstanding of building regulations. It was built to regulations but that did not stop the fire from destroying 1,198 rented units and the impact it had on the hundreds of people whose possessions were lost in the blaze. It was another painful reminder that fire does not discriminate; whether it is a self-storage warehouse, a university, a car park or an office, fires happen on a regular basis. The issue raised by Watchdog needs to be addressed but at the same time we need to work to help people clearly understand it is the minimum required. Building regulations will not protect their property from being lost in the event of a fire. In the case of a new build home, it means meeting the minimum required. Fire spread in building voids and the time for a fire to break out of a room will be limited and the occupants will have time to escape Regulation and guidance is about minimums but all too often the minimum is not clearly defined or communicated. The protection of property is often misunderstood. A recent YouGov survey found that 69% of the businesses polled thought that following Building Regulations’ Approved Document B (ADB) guidance meant that their business premises and contents would be adequately protected from fire events. It doesn’t, but it should. The decision to review Building Regulations Approved Document B (ADB) is welcomed by the BSA and many construction organisations across the industry.  Property protection should be a consideration of the ADB guidance to make buildings of the future resilient to fire. If you want to be resilient to fire you cannot rely on the minimum. Visit www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org  
    122 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Following a report last week by BBC’s Watchdog highlighting the hundreds of new build homes which are a fire risk, we are once again reminded of the dangerous gap between the expectation of safety, the reality of building regulations and the performance of buildings writes Tom Roche, Secretary of the Business Sprinkler Alliance. People assume that buildings are safe but if a building is built to regulations, what does that mean? What do people hear? Is it that the building complies with the statutory minimums to secure the health and safety of those in and around the building? In other words, you will escape the fire but your property is totally lost.  Or do people hear their property is protected by fire so both they and their possessions will be safe and protected from fire?  Or do people think we are safe from fire but there may be a little damage? The issue is therefore a case of clarity and an understanding of what the terms mean. It’s not unusual to hear after a fire that the building complied with building regulations. The fire may well have been devastating in terms of property damage but it was a success in terms of regulation and we could do no more. One only has to look at the devastating fire on New Year’s Eve at the Shurgard self-storage facility in Croydon as an example of the ambiguity and misunderstanding of building regulations. It was built to regulations but that did not stop the fire from destroying 1,198 rented units and the impact it had on the hundreds of people whose possessions were lost in the blaze. It was another painful reminder that fire does not discriminate; whether it is a self-storage warehouse, a university, a car park or an office, fires happen on a regular basis. The issue raised by Watchdog needs to be addressed but at the same time we need to work to help people clearly understand it is the minimum required. Building regulations will not protect their property from being lost in the event of a fire. In the case of a new build home, it means meeting the minimum required. Fire spread in building voids and the time for a fire to break out of a room will be limited and the occupants will have time to escape Regulation and guidance is about minimums but all too often the minimum is not clearly defined or communicated. The protection of property is often misunderstood. A recent YouGov survey found that 69% of the businesses polled thought that following Building Regulations’ Approved Document B (ADB) guidance meant that their business premises and contents would be adequately protected from fire events. It doesn’t, but it should. The decision to review Building Regulations Approved Document B (ADB) is welcomed by the BSA and many construction organisations across the industry.  Property protection should be a consideration of the ADB guidance to make buildings of the future resilient to fire. If you want to be resilient to fire you cannot rely on the minimum. Visit www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org  
    Jun 07, 2019 122
  • 05 Jun 2019
    Young people and their lack of interest in construction is a continual conversation within the industry, so as a 23 year old female who works in construction, I have to ask myself ‘Why has the industry lost its shine for our youth? What does the industry really need to do to make construction an industry of choice for young people, writes Paige Chapman? Construction is one of the most diverse and creative industries in the world. Spanning centuries and every country, there’s a rich history and a bright future that cannot be denied. So why is the younger generation uninterested in becoming a part of it? If they could see and experience the diversity of roles and projects that I help promote through social media, I’m sure they’d change their minds. I feel perception is a big part of the problem, as put simply young adults often think that working in construction is difficult manual labour that is poorly paid and better suited to men. Construction was once treated like a family heirloom, passed down from father to son for generations, but many young people are rejecting their parents’ expectations of them, without realising just how much the sector now has to offer. A career in the skilled trades is not seen as an exciting option in these times of YouTube and Instagram stars. Why go and physically exert yourself to get paid when you see people every day making videos and posting #Ads on Instagram… and getting paid a lot of money for it?! With such a masculine history, it’s understandable that so many young women don’t realise that it is a great career option for them. So many of the world’s top architects, engineers and surveyors are women, but there are also opportunities to be a graphic designer for a major contractor, or a copywriter, or a marketing or social media specialist talking about the exciting advancements that the world is making every day in construction. Check out the author of this blog! More and more young women are taking on trades and becoming excellent carpenters, plumbers, electricians etc. The promotion of these jobs needs to be stronger within education and from companies. A recent report by the Federation of Master Builders (FMB) stated that a third of homeowners would rather hire a female builder. Young women should be encouraged to take up these roles and the success stories of these women, who are paving the way, should be shared. Together we need to break down the outdated perceptions relating to the industry as they are both wrong and damaging to its future. Young people are vital to businesses, they bring with them enthusiasm, new ideas, an instant understanding of new technologies and they are ultimately our future. Because of this, every industry - not just construction - should be trying their hardest to welcome graduates and apprentices into the fold. So what needs to be done? Education needs to be the starting point in changing people’s opinions of a career in construction. Schools need to communicate and promote, to both genders, the diversity of construction, the roles it offers and the pathways into such a great industry. Ultimately, they need to push construction as a viable career option. Construction is creative and gives people the opportunity to leave behind a legacy. Any building work they may physically build, design or be a part of will be around for centuries to come and a great sense of pride and accomplishment comes with that. There has never been a better time to join the building industry. It is ripe with new opportunities and the shifting responsibilities of current roles, as new technology comes into play. Which is why there needs to be more communication to get the message out there that this industry isn’t just for older men. Young people, boys and girls alike, will bring fresh ideas and enthusiasm into this industry and expand it even further into the future. Here at Fabrick, we see the potential in young apprentices and graduates and each of our departments has a trainee or junior just brimming with innovative approaches to our work and ideas that our other members of staff may have never thought of. Meanwhile, our older staff members share their industry knowledge and experience with them. We find that a mixture of ages in each team really enhances the ability of the group as a whole, as they all have different areas of speciality and expertise! So, to conclude, companies should be pushing to show young people that the construction industry is a great place to spread their wings in the world of work. Paige Chapman is Digital Media Trainee, at Fabrick, a construction specialist Marketing and communications company. Visit: www.wearefabrick.com
    168 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Young people and their lack of interest in construction is a continual conversation within the industry, so as a 23 year old female who works in construction, I have to ask myself ‘Why has the industry lost its shine for our youth? What does the industry really need to do to make construction an industry of choice for young people, writes Paige Chapman? Construction is one of the most diverse and creative industries in the world. Spanning centuries and every country, there’s a rich history and a bright future that cannot be denied. So why is the younger generation uninterested in becoming a part of it? If they could see and experience the diversity of roles and projects that I help promote through social media, I’m sure they’d change their minds. I feel perception is a big part of the problem, as put simply young adults often think that working in construction is difficult manual labour that is poorly paid and better suited to men. Construction was once treated like a family heirloom, passed down from father to son for generations, but many young people are rejecting their parents’ expectations of them, without realising just how much the sector now has to offer. A career in the skilled trades is not seen as an exciting option in these times of YouTube and Instagram stars. Why go and physically exert yourself to get paid when you see people every day making videos and posting #Ads on Instagram… and getting paid a lot of money for it?! With such a masculine history, it’s understandable that so many young women don’t realise that it is a great career option for them. So many of the world’s top architects, engineers and surveyors are women, but there are also opportunities to be a graphic designer for a major contractor, or a copywriter, or a marketing or social media specialist talking about the exciting advancements that the world is making every day in construction. Check out the author of this blog! More and more young women are taking on trades and becoming excellent carpenters, plumbers, electricians etc. The promotion of these jobs needs to be stronger within education and from companies. A recent report by the Federation of Master Builders (FMB) stated that a third of homeowners would rather hire a female builder. Young women should be encouraged to take up these roles and the success stories of these women, who are paving the way, should be shared. Together we need to break down the outdated perceptions relating to the industry as they are both wrong and damaging to its future. Young people are vital to businesses, they bring with them enthusiasm, new ideas, an instant understanding of new technologies and they are ultimately our future. Because of this, every industry - not just construction - should be trying their hardest to welcome graduates and apprentices into the fold. So what needs to be done? Education needs to be the starting point in changing people’s opinions of a career in construction. Schools need to communicate and promote, to both genders, the diversity of construction, the roles it offers and the pathways into such a great industry. Ultimately, they need to push construction as a viable career option. Construction is creative and gives people the opportunity to leave behind a legacy. Any building work they may physically build, design or be a part of will be around for centuries to come and a great sense of pride and accomplishment comes with that. There has never been a better time to join the building industry. It is ripe with new opportunities and the shifting responsibilities of current roles, as new technology comes into play. Which is why there needs to be more communication to get the message out there that this industry isn’t just for older men. Young people, boys and girls alike, will bring fresh ideas and enthusiasm into this industry and expand it even further into the future. Here at Fabrick, we see the potential in young apprentices and graduates and each of our departments has a trainee or junior just brimming with innovative approaches to our work and ideas that our other members of staff may have never thought of. Meanwhile, our older staff members share their industry knowledge and experience with them. We find that a mixture of ages in each team really enhances the ability of the group as a whole, as they all have different areas of speciality and expertise! So, to conclude, companies should be pushing to show young people that the construction industry is a great place to spread their wings in the world of work. Paige Chapman is Digital Media Trainee, at Fabrick, a construction specialist Marketing and communications company. Visit: www.wearefabrick.com
    Jun 05, 2019 168

  • For your convenience we have listed 10 of the best “How to plaster a wall” blogs and guides and as we have no affiliations to any individual suppliers, it is for you to decide what works for you. Building Materials Company One of the better guides showing how to plaster a wall in nine easy steps  https://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/knowledge/how-to-plaster-a-wall       2. British Gypsum As one of the country’s leading manufacturers this How to guide is obviously aimed at its own products but also gives a more general guide to all types of plastering and may be better suited to the beginner. https://www.british-gypsum.com/product-range/plaster-products/how-to-plaster         3. Homebuilding and Renovating This is a more interesting guide as it tries to give useful tips covering a range of different plastering challenges. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/plastering-walls          4. DIY Doctor This website readily acknowledges that plastering can be difficult but concentrates on the finished job, the actual final coat or skim, which obviously has to look flat on completion. https://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/skim.htm           5. Dave’s Tips We like this site as it really tries to appeal to the beginner. Dave is an experienced plasterer and reckons it’s easy – but then it probably is for him. https://www.davesdiytips.com/plastering-for-beginners            6. Able Skills This is a site that assume you have never plastered a wall before and really does get down to the basics. We all know of course it’s not as easy as it’s made out – but well worth a look. https://www.ableskills.co.uk/blog/tutorials/how-to-apply-your-first-coat-of-plaster          7. Real Homes This is advice for those of us who live in old homes. Plastering is a more of a challenge in such buildings and this is where you will get the best tips if you have an older property. https://www.realhomes.com/advice/plaster-in-old-homes          8. The Spruce Keeping on the theme of old homes The Spruce takes it one stage further by discussing plaster and lath. If your home features such walls and ceilings then this is for you. https://www.thespruce.com/plaster-and-lath-came-before-drywall-1822861             9. Artex Ltd Probably one of the biggest plastering challenges and a throwback to all those 80’s style properties this How to guide shows you the best way to plaster over Artex. Good luck. https://www.artexltd.com/repair-hub/plastering-over-artex             10. Dummies Finally in our top 10 and the one that most find easier is a guide to how to repair cracks. These easy to follow instructions are worth a look. https://www.dummies.com/home-garden/walls-ceilings/how-to-fix-small-cracks-in-plaster
    Dec 13, 2018 411
  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 537
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 1050
  • Innovation Construction Wales Index, delivered in association with Construction Futures Wales, has been created to support and celebrate some of Wales’ most innovative businesses in the construction sector. Based in Maesteg, Bridgend, SIDERISE has been established for over 40 years. The company operates in 11 sectors with construction being a primary sector, including facades, interiors and HVAC. A pioneer in the design, development and manufacturer of fire and acoustic solutions, the company has seen its market expand beyond the UK to include the Middle East, India, Australia and the US. “Innovation has always been a key driver for SIDERISE and we are delighted to have been included in the Innovation Construction Wales Index,” commented Chris Hall, Sales Director of SIDERISE. “Our products are highly engineered and tested to the most rigorous standards to ensure compliance across many applications and sectors. Ensuring that we continue to look at how we can improve our products and solutions is critical to helping ensure the continued growth of the company and to maintain our position as a leader and pioneer within our sector.” The index was created through a comprehensive and independent judging process, with the final 33 companies being chosen for the way in which they demonstrate a commitment to improvement through change and to finding newer and better ways of doing things in the construction sector. Visit: www.siderise.com,  
    Jun 14, 2019 11
  • These construction-specific management solutions make light work of arduous manual processes typically managed in manual spreadsheets, and have a plethora of benefits including: tracking job costs in real-time, reporting, billing clients, managing subcontractors and tracking retentions. Contractors can perform these tasks on a single system, which reconciles data from multiple sources to gain one version of the truth on the performance and profitability of every contract. With these solutions now fully cloud-based, contractors of all sizes can manage their construction projects simultaneously on any device with an internet connection. Furthermore, Eque2’s entry-level solution, Construct Express, is now available from just £79 per month and removes all barriers for smaller contractors to take advantage of the functionality historically only enjoyed by larger businesses, without needing to invest heavily in I.T. hardware and support. Integrating seamlessly into Sage 50 Accounts, this new system retains and captures key information about all projects, holding data in one location in the cloud. Construct Express for Sage 50 is built with the smaller contractor in mind; alongside a minimal investment, smaller contractors can rest assured they’re compliant with online CIS verification, and gain complete visibility of costs in real-time to help them protect margins and ensure they remain competitive. Speaking on the launch of Eque2’s cloud-based solutions, Justin Moule, Managing Director, Commercial at Eque2 said: Our launch of Construct for Sage as a cloud-based solution signifies an important milestone for the construction industry. Contractors of all sizes can now benefit from the industry-specific functionality they need to protect margins, ensure compliance, reduce risk and mobilise their workforce – all alongside the comfort and familiarity of Sage Accounts.” Visit: https://www.eque2-cloud.co.uk/
    Jun 06, 2019 32
  • Parex’ product offering includes facade mortars, tile adhesives and waterproofing mortars. With its expertise in mortar solutions for renovation and new builds, Parex participates in all phases of the construction life cycle. Parex has a particularly strong presence in distribution channels, especially in China, where Parex has built up a network of over 90,000 points of sale. With its strong, recognised brands, Parex is known for its comprehensive R&D expertise and technical excellence. The company is locally present in 23 countries, with key positions in eight core markets, and operates 74 plants around the world. The acquisition of Parex will strengthen Sika’s growth platform. Its mortar business, which is a key growth technology for the group and one of its important earning contributors, will more than double in size to £1.8 billion. Parex’s strong position in distribution channels will open up new business opportunities for Sika’s product range. Parex will gain access to Sika’s well established direct sales channels, and Parex’s expertise in the facade and tile setting business will allow Sika to participate in these growing and attractive market fields. Paul Schuler, CEO of Sika said: “With the acquisition we are bringing together two strong companies. Parex’ and Sika’s joint business activities present an excellent growth platform for both organisations. In addition to the highly complementary fit with regard to product offerings and channels, we also see that Parex and Sika have very similar culture, values and management styles   ̶   with the focus on customer orientation, empowerment, high-quality products and services. The integration planning is well on track, and on-site visits have confirmed the attractiveness of the combination of the two businesses. We are excited to start working together to build our joint successful future. We warmly welcome all employees of Parex to the Sika Family.” Eric Bergé, CEO of Parex said: “I am very proud of what we have achieved. I want to thank the entire Parex team worldwide for their outstanding work. The months spent together with Sika to prepare this day showed how much these two great teams can bring to each other. We can look to the future with confidence.”
    Jun 04, 2019 46
  • One of Scotland’s largest regeneration projects, Quartermile is located on the historic 19-acre former site of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Masterplanned by Architects, Foster + Partners, Quartermile is one of the largest and most comprehensive regeneration schemes in Scotland. Combining new build with selective refurbishment. The development provides over 1,000 apartments along with 370,000 sq ft of Grade A office accommodation, 65,000 sq ft of retail and leisure space and seven acres of open landscaping. SIDERISE was approached by Edinburgh based façade specialists Charles Henshaw & Sons for its technical expertise in acoustics to find a bespoke solution that would meet the acoustic performance criteria requirements for Quartermile’s Q20 - Q25 apartment buildings, all of which feature curtain walling. The principal challenge was to achieve an on-site test value in excess of the 53dB DnT,w requirement for Building Regulations in Scotland. The target was 56dB DnT,w. For Henshaw this meant that the façade system, a potential weak point for flanking sound transmission, needed to achieve between 61-66dB Dnf,w flanking via the façade, past the floor slab areas, to exceed building regulations and provide the architect, client and project noise consultant RMP with a solution that offered high acoustic performance and a quality build.  Commenting on the collaborative working relationship with SIDERISE, Design Director Donald Fraser at Henshaw said: “We had very informative and lengthy discussions with Mike Carrick of SIDERISE, who helped us in achieving a far better detail at the slab edge, which not only met with the approval of RMP, it also proved to be the optimum solution.” SIDERISE recommended using its CW-FS 120 curtain wall firestop along with their AB10 acoustic matting solutionand CVB/C10 cavity barrier solution. Used to improve floor-to-floor acoustic performance and form a simple, high performance sound barrier, the acoustic matt was held up with 40mm x 20mm x 1.6mm galvanised angles to stop it sinking. SIDERISE mullion inserts were also specified to further increase the acoustic performance at the critical mullion detail.  “This comprehensive floor detail from SIDERISE has been used at Quartermile to good effect, with all the test data showing it passed and indeed exceeded the target ratio. It’s also extremely quick and easy to install,” added Donald Fraser. Involved in projects throughout the world and having manufactured acoustic and fire insulation products for more than 40 years, SIDERISE offers a large range of tried and tested product enhancements specifically developed for the façade industry. Designed to reduce vertical and horizontal sound transmission in curtain wall buildings, this range includes a choice of effective and proven sound reduction solutions that deal with all common sound path problems and are frequently used to assist in reducing flanking transmission between adjacent internal areas. Visit www.siderise.com
    May 21, 2019 59
  • SAS International was selected for its unique SAS740i linear ceiling solution with integrated lighting, which cannot be found anywhere else. This ceiling design, characterised by floating rafts, dominated the entire atrium space. Suspended within this area, the black and white SAS740i rafts were suspended 20m below the glass atrium room through a stainless steel cable system. Black SAS130 tiles with a SAS-DL perforation were also installed, not only to meet the area’s acoustic requirements, but to add an industrial quality to each floor. Completed in November 2018, SAS International designed and delivered timeless metal ceiling solutions that will bring the building well into the next phase of its lifetime. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com
    Mar 11, 2019 150
  • As the building was an operating school, a fire rated product was deemed to be a sensible option, therefore Proteus Pro-Felt® Ultima Plus Fireguard was installed. To incorporate the awkward detailing Proteus Pro-System® Plus was used. As it is a cold applied liquid, it meant it could be easily moulded. Proteus Waterproofing worked closely with the Proteus Approved Contractor James Roofing Ltd.  to ensure the project was completed to a high standard.  Due to the works being carried out during term time, safety was of utmost importance to the staff and pupils, as well as minimising disruptions or suspensions. Proteus Waterproofing promote fire safe installation methods conforming to the industry lead Safe2Torch guidelines and is also certified with the highest European Fire Rating BroofT4. Proteus Pro-Felt® Ultima Plus is a high-performance multi-layer bituminous membrane system, tested to perform in extreme temperatures and weather conditions. This membrane is impervious to water and will achieve a weather-tight roof.   It has class leading modified bitumen content which allows the flexible membrane to move with the building and ensure long term durability and performance which is certified by the BBA to be in excess of 30years. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk
    Mar 05, 2019 199
  • Gary will oversee the order and despatch operation at VJ Technology’s headquarters in Ashford, Kent. He will manage 30 staff, compromising three supervisors and a team of ‘picking and packing’ operatives. Gary commented, “This is a new and exciting role, which I’m delighted to have taken on. VJ Technology is a growing brand within the construction sector and I’m looking forward to playing a part in its future success.” Prior to joining VJ Technology, Gary was General Manager at the Aylesford office of delivery firm DPD UK. His logistics-based career has also included senior roles at TNT and the Royal Mail. His experience will be critical as VJ Technology is in the process of installing a new state of the art warehouse management system. Designed to optimise orders operations, this transition to a digital-based service, which is expected to be completed by August, will be one of Gary’s initial tasks.    “The management system will facilitate a huge change in the way VJ Technology processes orders,” Gary said. “I’m here to lead staff through the new phase and ensure they have all the support they need. It’s a big challenge for us all, but one we’re well-equipped to meet.  The warehouse management system is another VJ Technology initiative to further streamline our superb customer service offering.”
    May 21, 2019 66
  • FBP joined the Single Ply Roofing Association in September 2016 as part of an initiative to include EPDM manufacturers and ensure that SPRA was fully representative and driving quality across the whole of the single ply roofing sector. John said “I am very pleased to have been voted onto the SPRA Council by fellow membrane manufacturer members. I am looking forward to supporting SPRA activities and driving its initiatives to create a more productive and commercially successful construction sector. I am particularly interested in how we attract new talent into the single ply sector, raise awareness of SPRA with stakeholders, and ensure that we lead the roofing industry as an influential and effective voice.” John has 27 years’ experience in the construction industry, initially working as a charted architect and most recently as the General Manager of Firestone Building Products UK and Ireland. As well as having an understanding of the key factors behind design and specification of building elements in the context of the complete building; John has gained a full understanding of how roofing components are developed, marketed, technically supported and sold into the various supply chains through his various roles working for a building product manufacturer. Martyn Holloway, SPRA Chair said “I am very pleased to welcome John onto SPRA Council. His depth of knowledge and determination to improve the sector and attract new talent will be invaluable”. Cathie Clarke, CEO said “I am delighted that John is joining the leadership team. He will play an important role helping to drive our business plan and representing the EPDM sector on the SPRA Council. John joins Ian Muddiman (SIKA), Mike Crook (SIG D&T) and Steve Downey (DANOSA) as the four Membrane Representatives on the 12-strong SPRA Council. Their collective experience, enthusiasm & knowledge is a great asset to SPRA and has been a key element in the growth in influence of this dedicated and focussed specialist trade association”.Want to find out more about SPRA ? Visit: www.spra.co.uk -
    Mar 26, 2019 117
  • With more than 20 years’ construction-based sales and development experience to call upon, Donna is perfectly suited to the role. She joins Sika from Building Innovation Ltd where she held the position as Key Account Management for roofing and tapered insulation. Donna, who will be working with Area Technical Managers and the applications team, said: “This is an extremely exciting opportunity for me. Sika-Trocal is a leading light in the roofing industry and renowned as an innovator of high-quality solutions. I hope my experience will prove beneficial and further the company’s superb service offering.” Donna commenced her appointment with Sika-Trocal in February. “The chance to work for such a high-profile employer as Sika proved too great to resist,” she added. “It offers a huge, but very rewarding challenge. I’m looking forward to meeting my new colleagues and taking this next valuable step in my career. I’m particularly excited about being involved with the Bombardier and Rock Roofing projects and hope to hit the ground running.” Outside of the workplace, Donna cites her hobbies as walking and spending time with family and her dog. She said having the desire to improve personal and professional skills is key to career success. “Forging excellent account relationships and possessing good industry knowledge are traits I like to think have helped me progress in my chosen field,” she said. “It sounds old-fashioned, but I truly believe success is built on hard work and a willingness to learn.”
    Mar 14, 2019 179