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  • 11 Dec 2019
    A natural occurrence of someone walking is human induced vibrations. The effects of these vibrations aren’t life and death but can impact structures in a variety of ways, whether they’re buildings or bridges. Although not as serious as structural failure, minimising vibrations is a part of design that engineers need to largely consider in order to make people feel safe and comfortable. In this article, we’ll look at the impacts of vibrations. The Main Effects The two main effects of human induced vibrations are resonance and aeroelastic fluttering. In simpler terms, resonance happens when Object X vibrates at the same frequency as Object Y’s natural frequency. Object Y resonates with this and begins to vibrate too. Think singing to break a wine glass! Although the person singing isn’t touching the glass, the vibrations of their voice are resonating with the glass’s natural frequency, causing this vibration to get stronger and stronger and eventually, break the glass. Aeroelastic flutter happens when a force is exerted to an object which in turn makes it shake. It’s not necessarily at the same frequency as Object B’s natural vibration, but it makes Object B move all the same. When something resonates, it also flutters. But not everything that flutters is necessarily resonating. This is how confusion over disasters such as the Tacoma Bridge collapse occur — for a long time, and to this day, the event is used as a textbook example of resonance. However, it’s been argued that the bridge’s collapse wasn’t caused by resonance, but by fluttering. When human force is exerted and causes an object to vibrate, this is fluttering. Some instances would also see resonation happening too, but it wouldn’t be a certainty. Engineers must, of course, design to reduce the damage or discomfort caused by either fluttering or resonating.  Possible Effects Vibrations from human footfall, and the fluttering or resonation it can cause, can have many effects on a structure. These include: Hindering sensitive equipment. Depending on the building’s purpose, what it houses can be affected by the vibrations of people using the building. Universities, for example, may have sensitive equipment whose accuracy and performance could be damaged by vibrations. Effecting the structural integrity. The build-up of constant vibrations on a structure can, eventually, lead to structural integrity being compromised. A worse-case scenario would be the complete collapse of said structure. Effecting human health. According to research, vibrations in buildings and structures can cause depression and even motion sickness in inhabitants. Buildings naturally respond to external factors such as the wind or human footfall within. This low-frequency vibration can be felt, even subconsciously, by people. It has been argued that modern designs featuring thinner floor slabs and wider spacing in column design mean that these new builds are not as effective at dampening vibrations as older buildings are.  Wobbling bridges. One of the most famous examples of resonance, human induced vibrations, and fluttering all impacting a structure occurred with the Millennium Bridge. As people walked across the bridge, the vibrations and swaying caused oscillations in the bridge. Everyone crossing the bridge would then sway at the same time to avoid falling over, resulting in a cycle of increasing and amplifying the swaying effect. How to Prevent it Compared to old designs, contemporary structures tend to integrate thinner slabs and columns that are spaced widely, making them vulnerable to vibrations. Using structural design software at the design stage is an effective method for engineers to test footfall on a design and see the resulting vibrations. Although vibrations are something that happen naturally, engineers must consider reducing the effects of them in their designs to ensure security and comfort. Sources: https://www.oasys-software.com/news/analysing-vibration-with-gsa/ https://www.oasys-software.com/case-studies/footfall-analysis-singapores-helix-bridge/ https://www.oasys-software.com/case-studies/princeton-university-frick-laboratory/ http://homepage.tudelft.nl/p3r3s/MSc_projects/reportRoos.pdf https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/05/24/science-busts-the-biggest-myth-ever-about-why-bridges-collapse/#1b9e3b001f4c https://phys.org/news/2017-03-impact-bridges-skyscrapers-human-health.html https://phys.org/news/2017-03-impact-bridges-skyscrapers-human-health.html https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-difference-between-resonance-and-aeroelastic-flutter https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/03/19/wobbly-skyscrapers-may-trigger-motion-sickness-depression-warn/  
    88 Posted by Talk. Build
  • A natural occurrence of someone walking is human induced vibrations. The effects of these vibrations aren’t life and death but can impact structures in a variety of ways, whether they’re buildings or bridges. Although not as serious as structural failure, minimising vibrations is a part of design that engineers need to largely consider in order to make people feel safe and comfortable. In this article, we’ll look at the impacts of vibrations. The Main Effects The two main effects of human induced vibrations are resonance and aeroelastic fluttering. In simpler terms, resonance happens when Object X vibrates at the same frequency as Object Y’s natural frequency. Object Y resonates with this and begins to vibrate too. Think singing to break a wine glass! Although the person singing isn’t touching the glass, the vibrations of their voice are resonating with the glass’s natural frequency, causing this vibration to get stronger and stronger and eventually, break the glass. Aeroelastic flutter happens when a force is exerted to an object which in turn makes it shake. It’s not necessarily at the same frequency as Object B’s natural vibration, but it makes Object B move all the same. When something resonates, it also flutters. But not everything that flutters is necessarily resonating. This is how confusion over disasters such as the Tacoma Bridge collapse occur — for a long time, and to this day, the event is used as a textbook example of resonance. However, it’s been argued that the bridge’s collapse wasn’t caused by resonance, but by fluttering. When human force is exerted and causes an object to vibrate, this is fluttering. Some instances would also see resonation happening too, but it wouldn’t be a certainty. Engineers must, of course, design to reduce the damage or discomfort caused by either fluttering or resonating.  Possible Effects Vibrations from human footfall, and the fluttering or resonation it can cause, can have many effects on a structure. These include: Hindering sensitive equipment. Depending on the building’s purpose, what it houses can be affected by the vibrations of people using the building. Universities, for example, may have sensitive equipment whose accuracy and performance could be damaged by vibrations. Effecting the structural integrity. The build-up of constant vibrations on a structure can, eventually, lead to structural integrity being compromised. A worse-case scenario would be the complete collapse of said structure. Effecting human health. According to research, vibrations in buildings and structures can cause depression and even motion sickness in inhabitants. Buildings naturally respond to external factors such as the wind or human footfall within. This low-frequency vibration can be felt, even subconsciously, by people. It has been argued that modern designs featuring thinner floor slabs and wider spacing in column design mean that these new builds are not as effective at dampening vibrations as older buildings are.  Wobbling bridges. One of the most famous examples of resonance, human induced vibrations, and fluttering all impacting a structure occurred with the Millennium Bridge. As people walked across the bridge, the vibrations and swaying caused oscillations in the bridge. Everyone crossing the bridge would then sway at the same time to avoid falling over, resulting in a cycle of increasing and amplifying the swaying effect. How to Prevent it Compared to old designs, contemporary structures tend to integrate thinner slabs and columns that are spaced widely, making them vulnerable to vibrations. Using structural design software at the design stage is an effective method for engineers to test footfall on a design and see the resulting vibrations. Although vibrations are something that happen naturally, engineers must consider reducing the effects of them in their designs to ensure security and comfort. Sources: https://www.oasys-software.com/news/analysing-vibration-with-gsa/ https://www.oasys-software.com/case-studies/footfall-analysis-singapores-helix-bridge/ https://www.oasys-software.com/case-studies/princeton-university-frick-laboratory/ http://homepage.tudelft.nl/p3r3s/MSc_projects/reportRoos.pdf https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/05/24/science-busts-the-biggest-myth-ever-about-why-bridges-collapse/#1b9e3b001f4c https://phys.org/news/2017-03-impact-bridges-skyscrapers-human-health.html https://phys.org/news/2017-03-impact-bridges-skyscrapers-human-health.html https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-difference-between-resonance-and-aeroelastic-flutter https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/03/19/wobbly-skyscrapers-may-trigger-motion-sickness-depression-warn/  
    Dec 11, 2019 88
  • 03 Dec 2019
    The importance of acoustic sound testing in a space should never be underestimated, especially when it comes to open-plan commercial offices writes Genghis Akay, Director at Planet Partitioning. With substandard acoustic performance one of the cardinal errors of a poorly-designed office, how important is it to test sound levels in life-like scenarios? More to the point, if an office’s acoustic performance is below par, it can have negative repercussions on employees, affecting concentration, productivity and health. Considering employees’ wellbeing is at the heart of every business, how crucial is it to test a space’s acoustic performance for the sake of its occupants? Test as true to life Whilst there are computer-simulated assessment tests available which can provide an estimate of a space’s acoustic performance, it isn’t necessarily conclusive or reliable. In most cases, these tests will not account for what happens in reality. Considering every item in a space can affect acoustic performance – from the kinds of glazing seals to the method of construction – it is crucial to test acoustics in conditions as close to its real-time use. For instance, in some testing locations, glass partition framework is buried into the ceiling and the floor. But what happens if the framework is exposed? How will this discrepancy – between testing design and real-time design – affect the space’s acoustics? Products must be tested in true-to-life scenarios to ensure there are no discrepancies between when the product is tested and when it is installed. By selecting a testing centre which analyses the real-time performance of a space, clients achieve an accurate picture and ensure noisy acoustics are kept to a minimum. As well as being more or less true to real-life use, acoustic testing must also be without influence or bias. Prior to product installation, it is essential for all acoustic testing to be executed by an independent body, in which testing locations are UKAS-accredited (United Kingdom Accreditation Service). Installation phase When it comes to product installation, flanking sound transmission is an important consideration when it comes to partitions. Flanking sound transmission is when sound passes over and is not absorbed by objects. Sound that passes around objects is more disruptive for occupants, and tends to be more present in spaces with flimsy or weaker partitions. In these kinds of spaces it is crucial to strike the right balance. If companies install a sophisticated acoustic performance glass partition between a raised access floor and a suspended ceiling, the raised access floor and ceiling must be treated properly to combat flanking sound transmission. Essentially, it is about taking a holistic snapshot of how the space will perform to ensure acoustic levels are kept to the correct minimum. Without installing the right products, the quality of the whole space will be compromised. All of the components – from the services, to the partitions, to the type of surface – have to work in harmony within the space to assure acoustic performance. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk/
    152 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The importance of acoustic sound testing in a space should never be underestimated, especially when it comes to open-plan commercial offices writes Genghis Akay, Director at Planet Partitioning. With substandard acoustic performance one of the cardinal errors of a poorly-designed office, how important is it to test sound levels in life-like scenarios? More to the point, if an office’s acoustic performance is below par, it can have negative repercussions on employees, affecting concentration, productivity and health. Considering employees’ wellbeing is at the heart of every business, how crucial is it to test a space’s acoustic performance for the sake of its occupants? Test as true to life Whilst there are computer-simulated assessment tests available which can provide an estimate of a space’s acoustic performance, it isn’t necessarily conclusive or reliable. In most cases, these tests will not account for what happens in reality. Considering every item in a space can affect acoustic performance – from the kinds of glazing seals to the method of construction – it is crucial to test acoustics in conditions as close to its real-time use. For instance, in some testing locations, glass partition framework is buried into the ceiling and the floor. But what happens if the framework is exposed? How will this discrepancy – between testing design and real-time design – affect the space’s acoustics? Products must be tested in true-to-life scenarios to ensure there are no discrepancies between when the product is tested and when it is installed. By selecting a testing centre which analyses the real-time performance of a space, clients achieve an accurate picture and ensure noisy acoustics are kept to a minimum. As well as being more or less true to real-life use, acoustic testing must also be without influence or bias. Prior to product installation, it is essential for all acoustic testing to be executed by an independent body, in which testing locations are UKAS-accredited (United Kingdom Accreditation Service). Installation phase When it comes to product installation, flanking sound transmission is an important consideration when it comes to partitions. Flanking sound transmission is when sound passes over and is not absorbed by objects. Sound that passes around objects is more disruptive for occupants, and tends to be more present in spaces with flimsy or weaker partitions. In these kinds of spaces it is crucial to strike the right balance. If companies install a sophisticated acoustic performance glass partition between a raised access floor and a suspended ceiling, the raised access floor and ceiling must be treated properly to combat flanking sound transmission. Essentially, it is about taking a holistic snapshot of how the space will perform to ensure acoustic levels are kept to the correct minimum. Without installing the right products, the quality of the whole space will be compromised. All of the components – from the services, to the partitions, to the type of surface – have to work in harmony within the space to assure acoustic performance. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk/
    Dec 03, 2019 152
  • 06 Nov 2019
    Better office design can improve people’s lives writes Genghis Akay, Sales Director at Planet Partitioning. This should be a given but it’s often surprising how many businesses don’t consider workplace design a good business investment. One thing is for sure, technology can play a huge role in the future of our office environment to meet our needs and ensure it is truly a productive space.  For designers, it’s never been more important to get the balance right to ensure technology and office design integrates seamlessly.  What tools are at the designer’s disposal to make the design and operation of offices appealing to the employee to want to come to work and interact with others? Technology continues and will continue to play a big part in the way we work. It enables us to work from almost anywhere. This flexibility may well improve the health and wellbeing of the employee but we still have a long way to go in terms of the way in which we communicate how spaces should and need to be used. It’s vitally important employees have better structured and designed rooms and be able to utilise technology to maximise productivity. Glass partitions The advent of videoconferencing has seen rapid growth, but in the modern open office environment this has a knock-on effect with acoustical challenges for the designer. Glass, drywall, wood and concrete surfaces only exacerbate the issue.  There is a need for these spaces to be soundproof so that confidential discussions can be held. Therefore, it is a case of keeping noise out, as well as in. However, there is also the need for these spaces to feel open and airy rather than claustrophobic and closed in. This is why the acoustic performance of glazed partitions is so important. Furthermore, with the invention of special LCD privacy films on glass partitions, people can see through the film both ways, resulting in total screen privacy from the outside whilst being able to see through the film on the inside. Security Security is a concern for any business, but old fashioned and inconvenient security methods are a thing of the past in the 21st century office. Remote control operated locks have had a massive uptake with co-working spaces because people don’t want to issue keys as they may be misplaced or go missing. Partition and door systems need to be designed in a way so they can incorporate new and improved smart locks that can be operated by card keys or are Wi-Fi enabled, dispensing with keys altogether. There are no additional costs for duplicate keys or the associated servicing costs for key-operated locks.  Both Planet’s IsoPro doors and EclipseTec top hung acoustic sliding glass doors have options to include innovative electronic access control devices. With the modern workplace becoming increasingly mobile, there are greater demands on designers to ensure the agile office worker has access to a wide variety of work settings along with the right tools and technology. Ultimately, a shiny new workplace may well have all the bells and whistles but it will only ever work if it accurately reflects the needs of its habitants. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk
    257 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Better office design can improve people’s lives writes Genghis Akay, Sales Director at Planet Partitioning. This should be a given but it’s often surprising how many businesses don’t consider workplace design a good business investment. One thing is for sure, technology can play a huge role in the future of our office environment to meet our needs and ensure it is truly a productive space.  For designers, it’s never been more important to get the balance right to ensure technology and office design integrates seamlessly.  What tools are at the designer’s disposal to make the design and operation of offices appealing to the employee to want to come to work and interact with others? Technology continues and will continue to play a big part in the way we work. It enables us to work from almost anywhere. This flexibility may well improve the health and wellbeing of the employee but we still have a long way to go in terms of the way in which we communicate how spaces should and need to be used. It’s vitally important employees have better structured and designed rooms and be able to utilise technology to maximise productivity. Glass partitions The advent of videoconferencing has seen rapid growth, but in the modern open office environment this has a knock-on effect with acoustical challenges for the designer. Glass, drywall, wood and concrete surfaces only exacerbate the issue.  There is a need for these spaces to be soundproof so that confidential discussions can be held. Therefore, it is a case of keeping noise out, as well as in. However, there is also the need for these spaces to feel open and airy rather than claustrophobic and closed in. This is why the acoustic performance of glazed partitions is so important. Furthermore, with the invention of special LCD privacy films on glass partitions, people can see through the film both ways, resulting in total screen privacy from the outside whilst being able to see through the film on the inside. Security Security is a concern for any business, but old fashioned and inconvenient security methods are a thing of the past in the 21st century office. Remote control operated locks have had a massive uptake with co-working spaces because people don’t want to issue keys as they may be misplaced or go missing. Partition and door systems need to be designed in a way so they can incorporate new and improved smart locks that can be operated by card keys or are Wi-Fi enabled, dispensing with keys altogether. There are no additional costs for duplicate keys or the associated servicing costs for key-operated locks.  Both Planet’s IsoPro doors and EclipseTec top hung acoustic sliding glass doors have options to include innovative electronic access control devices. With the modern workplace becoming increasingly mobile, there are greater demands on designers to ensure the agile office worker has access to a wide variety of work settings along with the right tools and technology. Ultimately, a shiny new workplace may well have all the bells and whistles but it will only ever work if it accurately reflects the needs of its habitants. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk
    Nov 06, 2019 257

  • For your convenience we have listed 10 of the best “How to plaster a wall” blogs and guides and as we have no affiliations to any individual suppliers, it is for you to decide what works for you. Building Materials Company One of the better guides showing how to plaster a wall in nine easy steps  https://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/knowledge/how-to-plaster-a-wall       2. British Gypsum As one of the country’s leading manufacturers this How to guide is obviously aimed at its own products but also gives a more general guide to all types of plastering and may be better suited to the beginner. https://www.british-gypsum.com/product-range/plaster-products/how-to-plaster         3. Homebuilding and Renovating This is a more interesting guide as it tries to give useful tips covering a range of different plastering challenges. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/plastering-walls          4. DIY Doctor This website readily acknowledges that plastering can be difficult but concentrates on the finished job, the actual final coat or skim, which obviously has to look flat on completion. https://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/skim.htm           5. Dave’s Tips We like this site as it really tries to appeal to the beginner. Dave is an experienced plasterer and reckons it’s easy – but then it probably is for him. https://www.davesdiytips.com/plastering-for-beginners            6. Able Skills This is a site that assume you have never plastered a wall before and really does get down to the basics. We all know of course it’s not as easy as it’s made out – but well worth a look. https://www.ableskills.co.uk/blog/tutorials/how-to-apply-your-first-coat-of-plaster          7. Real Homes This is advice for those of us who live in old homes. Plastering is a more of a challenge in such buildings and this is where you will get the best tips if you have an older property. https://www.realhomes.com/advice/plaster-in-old-homes          8. The Spruce Keeping on the theme of old homes The Spruce takes it one stage further by discussing plaster and lath. If your home features such walls and ceilings then this is for you. https://www.thespruce.com/plaster-and-lath-came-before-drywall-1822861             9. Artex Ltd Probably one of the biggest plastering challenges and a throwback to all those 80’s style properties this How to guide shows you the best way to plaster over Artex. Good luck. https://www.artexltd.com/repair-hub/plastering-over-artex             10. Dummies Finally in our top 10 and the one that most find easier is a guide to how to repair cracks. These easy to follow instructions are worth a look. https://www.dummies.com/home-garden/walls-ceilings/how-to-fix-small-cracks-in-plaster
    Dec 13, 2018 805
  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 852
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 1341
  • The low-stress compound, which is ready for vinyl application in just 48-hours, is among finalists in this year’s Tomorrow’s Contract Floors Awards.  The contest celebrates the most innovative products and services in the flooring industry. Sika Schönox HS 50 has been shortlisted, with the winner being decided by an online vote which opens in January. Pete Hollingworth, Business Unit Managerat Sika Flooring, said: “This is extremely exciting news about a very exciting product. Schönox HS 50 represents genuine innovation. It speeds-up the flooring process without compromising quality. We believe our product is ‘next level’ as far as floor technology is concerned; the judges of this revered industry award would appear to agree. We are very proud to hear of its nomination.” Containing Patented Active Dry Technology, Schönox HS 50 combines the flow-ability and surface finish of a calcium sulphate screed whilst possessing the rapid-curing properties of cement-based systems. Largely unaffected by humidity and temperature, Sika Schönox HS-50 allows for applications in the summer and winter months without curing issues. In terms of industry accreditation, Schönox HS 50 is marked as EC 1PLUS R and fulfils the Blue Angel criteria for its environmentally-friendly credentials. It is also classified to EN 13813 as CA-C35-F10.
    Dec 03, 2019 76
  • We Build The Future works to improve support and advice for people who work in the construction and built environment sector who face the challenge of dealing with cancer in their lives. Helping to fund research, which can help accelerate improvements in the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer, the charity aims to promote health and wellbeing across the industry to help reduce the risk of people developing cancer in the first place. CABE’s objective is to promote and advance the knowledge, study and practice of each and all of the arts and sciences concerned with building technology, planning, design, construction, maintenance and repair of the built environment. Further, it aims to create and maintain a high standard of professional qualification, conduct and practice whilst encouraging and facilitating co-operation between the construction professions. With members practising in over 55 countries, the organisation has an extensive reach and it is hoped that over the next 12 months through a number of fund raising activities, money can be raised to help further the work of We Build The Future. Ant Burd, President of CABE said “It is a huge honour for me to be both one of the original trustees of We Build The Future (WBTF) and now the current President of CABE. Given WBTF was specifically set up to support those working in the Built Environment sector it amounts to a perfect fit whereby working with CABE and its 8000+ members we can seek to raise money that will go directly to support and help those in need working within our own sector.” We Build The Future is an official supporter of the world’s biggest cancer charity, Cancer Research UK. This ensures that any funds raised are used to support research whilst ensuring access to expert information and support for people working in the construction and built environment sector. Visit: www.webuildthefuture.org
    Aug 27, 2019 177
  • G-Cloud 11 enables cloud service providers – such as GroupBC – to offer digital, contract-based facilities to public sector organisations, by ensuring suppliers are compliant with, and have met the standards laid out in the G-Cloud framework . Launched in 2012, the initiative has done well to expedite and ease the procurement process, radically changing the route to market for Government departments, agencies, local authorities and education establishments. Divided into three ‘lots’ – cloud hosting, cloud software and cloud support – GroupBC, under the registered name Business Collaborator Ltd), entered into the cloud software (SaaS) category and was once again successful in its application. The G-Cloud service enables GroupBC to continue delivering their leading Project to Asset Information Management Common Data Environment (PIM / AIM CDE) for Clients wanting to securely digitise their estate in order to optimize performance. Speaking on its success, Stuart Bell, Sales and Marketing Director at GroupBC said: “We’re delighted to have again been successful on the G-Cloud framework. In previous years we have been selected by prominent organisations such as Highways England and most recently, University of Birmingham, and look forward to working with more customers who recognise and are enthusiastic about the benefits of digital technologies, and in particular, how the BC CDE underpins the ‘golden thread’ of information throughout their assets lifecycle.” Visit:https://www.digitalmarketplace.service.gov.uk/g-cloud/services/450429126643230
    Jul 31, 2019 252
  • The project involved waterproofing a 2,000m2 area spanning nine roofs at Kingston University in Surrey. The mix of green, single-ply and hot-melt finishes covered the new building. With facilities including a learning resources centre, courtyard and cafés, it’s hoped the new ‘Town House’ building will transform students’ learning experience. Having been selected as the project’s waterproofing specialists by main contractor Willmott Dixon, BriggsAmasco worked alongside award-winning and Stirling Prize-nominated design team, Graton Architects. The multiplex flat-roof installation began in March 2018. It involved BriggsAmasco applying a range of waterproofing systems across differing heights and levels. These included an IKO hot-melt waterproofing membrane within a system comprising XPS rigid foam insulation, as well as paving and ballast finishes to the main roof areas. A built-up, reinforced felt waterproofing solution with tapered insulation was also installed to a green roof in order to conform with a height restriction. Additionally, IKO Armourplan PSG single-ply waterproofing, along with PIR insulation, was affixed to colonnade areas of the roof. The new building’s main road location next to the university presented an additional challenge to Briggs’ on-site team. The area was in constant use by students, therefore in order to minimise disruption material delivery times had to be scheduled to coincide with the start of each roofing phase. It left little room for delay for Briggs’ installers if the operation was run to smoothly. Fortunately, their experience and diligence ensured this and other challenges were overcome. It meant this huge, highly-complex project was completed in September 2019 in line with the client’s deadline. Kingston University Town House provides further evidence of BriggsAmasco’s ability to rise to the occasion – no matter how challenging the roofing project.
    Dec 04, 2019 82
  • The Melody Gardens and Corporation Road projects were designed to increase the number of available affordable homes in Salford. Watson Homes carried out the work on both developments, which were built on behalf of Places for People and ForHousing. For Melody Gardens it involved the building of a four-storey block comprising 48 apartments; nine two-storey houses, and a bungalow. The properties were being built on a 0.4-hectare site once occupied by a Catholic church. Due to the superb reputation of its products and service, Recticel was selected to supply the development’s cavity wall and ground floor insulation. As part of Recticel’s quality PIR range, Eurothane GP, a low-thermal conductivity panel, provided Melody Gardens’ ground floor insulation. With a low-thermal conductivity of 0.022W/mK, the Eurothane GP panel’s dimensional stability and super-flat surface help create homes which excel in terms of comfort and wellbeing. Such a solution is crucial for multiple-occupancy buildings where the risk of damp and increased noise levels is greater than single occupancies. For the buildings’ walls, Eurowall Cavity was installed. The closed-cell, rigid polyisocyanurate foam board helps regulate temperature to create a warm and even interior climate. The use of a residual 50mm clear cavity means Eurowall Cavity may be used in any exposure zone. It’s estimated the Melody Gardens building project will be completed in November 2019. Eurothane GP and Eurowall Cavity were also used as respective floor and wall insulation for the Corporation Gardens project. A total of 2,525m2 of insulation was installed during the development carried out by Watson Homes. It comprises 18, one-bed and 15, two-bed apartments. The easy usability of both products proved essential in ensuring contractors were able to meet the client’s strict deadline and complete building works to the highest specification in May 2018. Mike Watson, Construction Director at Watson Homes, said: “Recticel’s high-quality products were essential to ensuring the fabric of both developments was fitted with insulation that will fulfil the occupants’ long-term domestic needs. In terms of installation, the panels’ easy-fit properties made quicker, lighter work of a potentially challenging project.” The durability and thermal performance facilitated by Eurothane GP and Eurowall Cavity panels will help create damp-free and moisture-free interiors at Melody Gardens and Corporation Road. It will result in these developments becoming a welcome and much-valued addition to Salford’s social housing portfolio. Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Aug 05, 2019 217
  • Located a tranquil distance away from Portsmouth Harbour and a mere 120-minute drive from central London, the Ordnance Yard development in Gosport, Hampshire was delivered by Elite Homes and designed to take the breath away. It features nine, ultra-modern, luxury homes which not only reflect the proud heritage of their surroundings; in terms of style, comfort and sustainability they are dream-living made reality. Ordnance Yard, which resides on the banks of the Priddy’s Hard peninsula, was born following the regeneration of a listed, 200-year-old former munitions depot. It led to a superb selection of contemporary homes being built within enormous blast walls once occupied by shell-filling and emptying rooms which powered Britain’s Victorian and wartime armouries. Sustainably-built using local materials and contractors, these thermally-efficient, open-fronted properties are a metal-clad reminder of the site’s naval heritage and a splendorous innovation in themselves. However, the two elevated houses which bookend the development are its architectural tour-de-force. Clad in a lighter, metal grey, the striking former Trotyl melting room structures appear to symbolise the bold ambition that fuelled the beautiful transformation of this once barren site. Although separated from Portsmouth’s bustling centre by a relatively narrow stretch of water - Forton Lake, an inter-tidal site of Special Scientific Interest and a Special Protection area for birds - Ordnance Yard is a world away from the bump and grind of everyday urban life. The site lies within the Priddy’s Hard Conservation Wildlife Area. From the peninsula’s peaceful shore a seagull’s cry or the muffled bellow of a ship’s horn, as it passes far on the horizon, evoke a tantalisingly-diametric sense of belonging and escape. For this is a place to live, relax, explore and discover; befitting of the modern mantra for residential environments which enhance the health and well-being of occupants. As well as bearing an inspiring aesthetic, the homes are a benchmark for comfortable, sustainable living. Each exceeds building regulation levels for energy performance due to a plethora of carbon-limiting features. An 8kw-capactiy air source heat pump is installed within each property along with windows specifically designed for solar gain. Expert design, augmented by quality workmanship and materials ensure low-level, U-value performance and excellent airtight readings are upheld throughout each of the nine homes.  A standalone development, Ordnance Yard is nonetheless the instigator for the wider regeneration of the Priddy’s Hard site. Future plans include the restoration of other buildings to create more homes as well as an armed forces museum and a gin distillery As Priddy’s Hard gradually returns to life, it’s anticipated many jobs and much investment will follow. As the game changer for the area’s long-term emergence, Ordnance Yard is an exemplar of how architectural vision can be applied to spectacular effect in creating daring, desirable housing developments that live comfortably alongside Britain’s industrial past. Visit: http://elitehomesltd.co.uk/
    Jun 27, 2019 417
  • Cathie Clarke, SPRA CEO said “Invictus Roofing only became members of SPRA at the end of August this year and Josh’s selection as a SPRA Director shows that the SPRA leadership team is open to all members, new and old from companies large and small. What is very important is a passion for the single ply industry and an enthusiasm to get involved in supporting and directing the organisation for the benefit of the membership and the wider industry.” Martyn Holloway, SPRA CEO added “Congratulations to Josh! I am look forward to formally welcoming him to the Council and listening to the fresh ideas that I am sure he will bring to the table.” Josh said on his election, “Thank you for everybody’s vote of confidence, I am really looking forward to meeting my fellow Directors and being part of the SPRA leadership team. Single Ply Roofing has been a major part of my working life to date, and I feel that my 17 years of experience in the field, being a young director, and keeping in touch with installing and site work will allow me to bring a different outlook to the Council and appropriately represent SPRA contractors.”
    Nov 19, 2019 104
  • He began his new role on November 1st, stepping-up from the Marketing Manager’s position he held within Sika roofing. “It’s incredibly exciting to be given this new challenge,” Pete said. “I’m looking forward to bringing some of my background experience and new ideas to the role, as well as being involved in product development and developing strong relationships.“ Having started his Sika career in 2005 within the marketing team for Liquid Plastics, Pete became Marketing Manager for the company’s roofing division in 2014. Pete, 40, whose new, field-based role involves supporting Sika-Trocal’s seven area technical managers, said: It's an ever-changing fast-paced market environment, so being as close to our customers as possible allows us to respond to these changes and give our customers exactly what they need. Sika-Trocal’s fantastic product range gives us a distinct advantage and we’re also fortunate to have a superb team of area mangers who have built-up a brilliant long-term relationship with our customers. This is something we want to continue to nurture”     
    Nov 12, 2019 140
  • This new challenge will see Murray working with contractors, architects and engineers on specification projects that include Sika screed and Sika resin coating solutions for industrial and commercial projects including car parks and deck finishes. Prior to his appointment, Murray worked in the Sika Specialist Distribution team, managing key accounts that support the supply of products for key projects via the distribution supply chain. In total he has been with Sika for more than 10 years, having previously worked at Sika Everbuild. It has enabled him to gain vast specialist sales experience within the construction sector. Murray, who began his Sika Flooring role in September, said:  “The move to Sika Flooring represents a huge opportunity for me. The sector has always interested me. Whether it be the health sector, the food and drink industry or manufacturing, Sika has a flooring solution for a wide range of applications. I’m looking to demonstrate how Sika systems are the number one choice for new-build and refurbishment projects.” Bill Woodham, Sikafloor’s Target Market National Area Manager, said: “We’re delighted to have Murray on board. He has worked extensively in the construction industry and brings with him a wealth of opportunities and contacts. Murray will be joining an evolving team that continuously strives to meet and exceed customer expectations and deliver a best-in-class customer experience. We look forward to Murray building on the success he has already achieved at Sika.”
    Nov 06, 2019 167