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  • 06 Nov 2019
    Better office design can improve people’s lives writes Genghis Akay, Sales Director at Planet Partitioning. This should be a given but it’s often surprising how many businesses don’t consider workplace design a good business investment. One thing is for sure, technology can play a huge role in the future of our office environment to meet our needs and ensure it is truly a productive space.  For designers, it’s never been more important to get the balance right to ensure technology and office design integrates seamlessly.  What tools are at the designer’s disposal to make the design and operation of offices appealing to the employee to want to come to work and interact with others? Technology continues and will continue to play a big part in the way we work. It enables us to work from almost anywhere. This flexibility may well improve the health and wellbeing of the employee but we still have a long way to go in terms of the way in which we communicate how spaces should and need to be used. It’s vitally important employees have better structured and designed rooms and be able to utilise technology to maximise productivity. Glass partitions The advent of videoconferencing has seen rapid growth, but in the modern open office environment this has a knock-on effect with acoustical challenges for the designer. Glass, drywall, wood and concrete surfaces only exacerbate the issue.  There is a need for these spaces to be soundproof so that confidential discussions can be held. Therefore, it is a case of keeping noise out, as well as in. However, there is also the need for these spaces to feel open and airy rather than claustrophobic and closed in. This is why the acoustic performance of glazed partitions is so important. Furthermore, with the invention of special LCD privacy films on glass partitions, people can see through the film both ways, resulting in total screen privacy from the outside whilst being able to see through the film on the inside. Security Security is a concern for any business, but old fashioned and inconvenient security methods are a thing of the past in the 21st century office. Remote control operated locks have had a massive uptake with co-working spaces because people don’t want to issue keys as they may be misplaced or go missing. Partition and door systems need to be designed in a way so they can incorporate new and improved smart locks that can be operated by card keys or are Wi-Fi enabled, dispensing with keys altogether. There are no additional costs for duplicate keys or the associated servicing costs for key-operated locks.  Both Planet’s IsoPro doors and EclipseTec top hung acoustic sliding glass doors have options to include innovative electronic access control devices. With the modern workplace becoming increasingly mobile, there are greater demands on designers to ensure the agile office worker has access to a wide variety of work settings along with the right tools and technology. Ultimately, a shiny new workplace may well have all the bells and whistles but it will only ever work if it accurately reflects the needs of its habitants. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk
    147 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Better office design can improve people’s lives writes Genghis Akay, Sales Director at Planet Partitioning. This should be a given but it’s often surprising how many businesses don’t consider workplace design a good business investment. One thing is for sure, technology can play a huge role in the future of our office environment to meet our needs and ensure it is truly a productive space.  For designers, it’s never been more important to get the balance right to ensure technology and office design integrates seamlessly.  What tools are at the designer’s disposal to make the design and operation of offices appealing to the employee to want to come to work and interact with others? Technology continues and will continue to play a big part in the way we work. It enables us to work from almost anywhere. This flexibility may well improve the health and wellbeing of the employee but we still have a long way to go in terms of the way in which we communicate how spaces should and need to be used. It’s vitally important employees have better structured and designed rooms and be able to utilise technology to maximise productivity. Glass partitions The advent of videoconferencing has seen rapid growth, but in the modern open office environment this has a knock-on effect with acoustical challenges for the designer. Glass, drywall, wood and concrete surfaces only exacerbate the issue.  There is a need for these spaces to be soundproof so that confidential discussions can be held. Therefore, it is a case of keeping noise out, as well as in. However, there is also the need for these spaces to feel open and airy rather than claustrophobic and closed in. This is why the acoustic performance of glazed partitions is so important. Furthermore, with the invention of special LCD privacy films on glass partitions, people can see through the film both ways, resulting in total screen privacy from the outside whilst being able to see through the film on the inside. Security Security is a concern for any business, but old fashioned and inconvenient security methods are a thing of the past in the 21st century office. Remote control operated locks have had a massive uptake with co-working spaces because people don’t want to issue keys as they may be misplaced or go missing. Partition and door systems need to be designed in a way so they can incorporate new and improved smart locks that can be operated by card keys or are Wi-Fi enabled, dispensing with keys altogether. There are no additional costs for duplicate keys or the associated servicing costs for key-operated locks.  Both Planet’s IsoPro doors and EclipseTec top hung acoustic sliding glass doors have options to include innovative electronic access control devices. With the modern workplace becoming increasingly mobile, there are greater demands on designers to ensure the agile office worker has access to a wide variety of work settings along with the right tools and technology. Ultimately, a shiny new workplace may well have all the bells and whistles but it will only ever work if it accurately reflects the needs of its habitants. Visit: https://www.planetpartitioning.co.uk
    Nov 06, 2019 147
  • 23 Oct 2019
    The law states that on construction sites action is required to protect those at work on site and members of the public. Therefore, necessary measures must be taken to ensure the health and safety of everyone. This can include enforcing rules within the workplace for employees and making the general public aware of the dangers of entering a construction site. Only authorised personnel who meet the necessary criteria should be allowed on site at any time. Construction sites can potentially be extremely dangerous, so following these safety tips should keep you and your workforce safe while on site. Health & Safety Training It is a legal requirement that employers offer and provide training to their employees. Not doing this can lead to substantial injures or even be fatal for employees. Whilst employers can receive hefty fines for not abiding by the regulations set out to ensure employee health and safety. There are many courses available for working on construction sites, from manual handling courses to working at heights training. Ensuring all employees are trained in the required area will provide a fully qualified and highly competent workforce. One in three injures at work are caused by the manual handling of heavy objects incorrectly. Providing manual handling training will enable workers to carry heavy components in a safe manner. In 2017 falling from height was the most frequent cause of fatal accidents at work, this is surly a good enough reason to make sure any employees working at height are fully trained and qualified to do so. Not only will these injuries affect your employees, but your construction projects may suffer. If the vital work they were carrying out is halted whist they recover or a replacement cannot be found to finish the work, then the project will suffer as a consequence of this. Safety Equipment Within the construction industry there are many hazards and therefore, a vast amount of safety equipment should be used on a day to day basis to keep employees safe. This equipment includes: Fall restraints/arrest systems can be used whist working at heights to prevent injuries or even death. This will either prevent construction workers from falling in the first place or can be used to prevent fatal injuries by safely stopping a worker from falling. These systems can consist of harnesses, horizonal lifelines and vertical lifelines. Safety netting is another example of safety equipment which can be used whilst working at height. Having netting below someone working at height will allow a safe landing if they do fall. Hearing protection should be used when working with loud machinery and power tools on a construction site to protect the ears. Since prolonged periods of exposure to loud noises can cause immediate and long-lasting damage. Tool Lanyards are important types of safety equipment, as this will protect the safety of workers below. Attaching tools to a lanyard will ensure tools aren’t dropped from height onto people working, standing or walking below - which could cause considerable injuries. Protective workwear It is essential for all employees to wear the necessary protective workwear whilst on site. Some workwear is required all the time, whilst some workwear is only required in specific cases. Boots must always be worn on site for protection, since there may be potentially dangerous equipment or machinery on the ground. Also work boots will provide grip for wet and slippery surfaces, particularly in winter when it may be snowy or raining. Helmets must also be worn whenever on site to reduce the risk of head injuries, which could be caused by something being dropped or falling from above. Not only this but head injuries could also be uncured banging it on a low hanging piece of equipment such as a ladder or scaffolding. High vis should be worn to stay safe on the job. The visible clothing will not only notify other employees but also members of the public will then be aware of construction work taking place and take the necessary precautions when passing by. Sun protection is essential during the summer months, since working outside for prolonged periods can cause heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. Wearing protective clothes in the hot weather will allow breathability and protect the skin from the sun – reducing the risk of skin related diseases like melanoma. Gloves should be worn for hand protection whilst working on a construction site. Wearing gloves will protect the hands from harmful chemicals, getting cuts from sharp objects or burns. Furthermore, during the winter months gloves can keep the hands warm and supple. Face shields/masks or goggles should be used to protect the face, eyes and lungs if work being carried out emanates toxic fumes, particulate matter or hazardous chemicals. Risk Assessments Carrying out risk assessments is essential when managing health and safety in construction. A risk assessment will identify and evaluate any potential hazards or dangers on the site. In doing this the necessary control measures can be taken to ensure a safer environment. In certain construction sectors, a risk assessment is vital since employees may need to be notified about dangers which cannot be eliminated. For example, any electrical work will come with potentially severe risks which need to be recognised and employees must be advised to proceed with caution. Visible Signage Keeping employees safe is only half the battle – employers also must ensure the safety of the general public according to management regulations. Visible signage must surround the construction site giving warning to passers-by, so they are aware of the dangers of entering the premises. This could consist of signs saying, ‘Warning Construction Site’ or ‘Construction Site KEEP OUT’, they should be yellow, black or red as these are warning colours. Safety fencing should surround the site to protect more vulnerable people and children who may wander onto site unaware of the dangers. Site Organisation No matter the construction activity, the site should be organised and tidy. Slips, trips and falls account for nearly one third of injuries on construction sites, whilst 40% of fatalities are caused by slips, trips and falls. However, there is a simple solution to prevent these injuries – by organising the construction site, keeping materials and equipment out of the way and keeping the site tidy should decrease the number of accidents. Clearly in the winter when the ground is slippery, slips may be more common. Spreading grit or salt on the ground can be an easy fix to lower the chances of employees slipping.
    238 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The law states that on construction sites action is required to protect those at work on site and members of the public. Therefore, necessary measures must be taken to ensure the health and safety of everyone. This can include enforcing rules within the workplace for employees and making the general public aware of the dangers of entering a construction site. Only authorised personnel who meet the necessary criteria should be allowed on site at any time. Construction sites can potentially be extremely dangerous, so following these safety tips should keep you and your workforce safe while on site. Health & Safety Training It is a legal requirement that employers offer and provide training to their employees. Not doing this can lead to substantial injures or even be fatal for employees. Whilst employers can receive hefty fines for not abiding by the regulations set out to ensure employee health and safety. There are many courses available for working on construction sites, from manual handling courses to working at heights training. Ensuring all employees are trained in the required area will provide a fully qualified and highly competent workforce. One in three injures at work are caused by the manual handling of heavy objects incorrectly. Providing manual handling training will enable workers to carry heavy components in a safe manner. In 2017 falling from height was the most frequent cause of fatal accidents at work, this is surly a good enough reason to make sure any employees working at height are fully trained and qualified to do so. Not only will these injuries affect your employees, but your construction projects may suffer. If the vital work they were carrying out is halted whist they recover or a replacement cannot be found to finish the work, then the project will suffer as a consequence of this. Safety Equipment Within the construction industry there are many hazards and therefore, a vast amount of safety equipment should be used on a day to day basis to keep employees safe. This equipment includes: Fall restraints/arrest systems can be used whist working at heights to prevent injuries or even death. This will either prevent construction workers from falling in the first place or can be used to prevent fatal injuries by safely stopping a worker from falling. These systems can consist of harnesses, horizonal lifelines and vertical lifelines. Safety netting is another example of safety equipment which can be used whilst working at height. Having netting below someone working at height will allow a safe landing if they do fall. Hearing protection should be used when working with loud machinery and power tools on a construction site to protect the ears. Since prolonged periods of exposure to loud noises can cause immediate and long-lasting damage. Tool Lanyards are important types of safety equipment, as this will protect the safety of workers below. Attaching tools to a lanyard will ensure tools aren’t dropped from height onto people working, standing or walking below - which could cause considerable injuries. Protective workwear It is essential for all employees to wear the necessary protective workwear whilst on site. Some workwear is required all the time, whilst some workwear is only required in specific cases. Boots must always be worn on site for protection, since there may be potentially dangerous equipment or machinery on the ground. Also work boots will provide grip for wet and slippery surfaces, particularly in winter when it may be snowy or raining. Helmets must also be worn whenever on site to reduce the risk of head injuries, which could be caused by something being dropped or falling from above. Not only this but head injuries could also be uncured banging it on a low hanging piece of equipment such as a ladder or scaffolding. High vis should be worn to stay safe on the job. The visible clothing will not only notify other employees but also members of the public will then be aware of construction work taking place and take the necessary precautions when passing by. Sun protection is essential during the summer months, since working outside for prolonged periods can cause heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. Wearing protective clothes in the hot weather will allow breathability and protect the skin from the sun – reducing the risk of skin related diseases like melanoma. Gloves should be worn for hand protection whilst working on a construction site. Wearing gloves will protect the hands from harmful chemicals, getting cuts from sharp objects or burns. Furthermore, during the winter months gloves can keep the hands warm and supple. Face shields/masks or goggles should be used to protect the face, eyes and lungs if work being carried out emanates toxic fumes, particulate matter or hazardous chemicals. Risk Assessments Carrying out risk assessments is essential when managing health and safety in construction. A risk assessment will identify and evaluate any potential hazards or dangers on the site. In doing this the necessary control measures can be taken to ensure a safer environment. In certain construction sectors, a risk assessment is vital since employees may need to be notified about dangers which cannot be eliminated. For example, any electrical work will come with potentially severe risks which need to be recognised and employees must be advised to proceed with caution. Visible Signage Keeping employees safe is only half the battle – employers also must ensure the safety of the general public according to management regulations. Visible signage must surround the construction site giving warning to passers-by, so they are aware of the dangers of entering the premises. This could consist of signs saying, ‘Warning Construction Site’ or ‘Construction Site KEEP OUT’, they should be yellow, black or red as these are warning colours. Safety fencing should surround the site to protect more vulnerable people and children who may wander onto site unaware of the dangers. Site Organisation No matter the construction activity, the site should be organised and tidy. Slips, trips and falls account for nearly one third of injuries on construction sites, whilst 40% of fatalities are caused by slips, trips and falls. However, there is a simple solution to prevent these injuries – by organising the construction site, keeping materials and equipment out of the way and keeping the site tidy should decrease the number of accidents. Clearly in the winter when the ground is slippery, slips may be more common. Spreading grit or salt on the ground can be an easy fix to lower the chances of employees slipping.
    Oct 23, 2019 238
  • 08 Aug 2019
    Advancements in technology have improved most industries, including the construction and engineering sectors.  But could humans eventually find themselves redundant within these work spheres at the expense of technology?  Probably not!  After all, software is usually only as good as the human operating it… Computer-based assistance really is just that: a tool to assist. The successful link between computer programmes and engineering skill varies depending on which part of the AEC industry they are being used in. To understand how this factor can impact their relationship, we must first look at the three main stages of engineering design.  Concept design: At this stage, the majority of the design comes from the imagination of the engineer, supported by some simple sizing elements or calculations. Drafting and analysis: This stage brings the concept design into the real world more earnestly, checking that it is feasible and how it will succeed. This stage is predominantly computer-based, using, for example building design software, which strives to assist engineers work with regards to accuracy. Detailed design: This stage is when, as the name suggests, the design becomes much more detailed. At this point, the design is almost completely computer-based, with analysis happening in the background. It’s likely that such processes will always require an aspect of creativity and imagination — the ability to think outside the box and problem-solve in new ways. But it’s not just the imaginative aspect that machines cannot replicate in full: fine tuning, for example, still needs a guiding human hand in order to ensure the outputs are correct. While leaps and bounds are certainly being made in machine learning, whereby computers can now make decisions based on historical data and records, it is highly unlikely that this will develop to the point where human skill and judgement become obsolete. Naturally, human judgment is not flawless. Mistakes can be made when writing the programmes designed to support design, or further along the line when inputting data into these programmes. Either error will result in an inaccurate output. For this reason, the topic of automated checking — whereby computer programmes will check the input against previous projects and their success or failure — has been a hot point of discussion within the AEC industry lately. However, it is worth bearing in mind that the majority of engineering disasters have occurred due to something unusual; that is, something that has not happened in previous related projects. While rule-checkers help when situations where rules apply, they aren’t able to flag something that hasn’t happened in previous records, i.e. something unusual. There are many examples of such missed errors. For example, the Millennium Bridge’s well-known wobble was not picked up on at any point by the design’s code. Programmes failed to predict the wind instability of Tacoma Narrows. While engineers can make use of a value judgement, computer programmes do not. As the world changes, engineers will make a value judgement to adapt their designs accordingly. In order for both human and technological processes to be as accurate as possible, formulas need to be crafted. There are several structures and designs that have had formulas developed exclusively for them. For example, the original formula creation for shell structures had to be created by expert mathematicians to ensure success. Now, with Finite element Analysis, almost any form can be analysed — but that does not mean these forms are always sensible. There’s a certain amount of tension between architects and engineers surrounding this. Where engineers are seen as wanting functionality, architect are seen as wanting novelty first. But this disparity makes for the perfect partnership towards the best designs.        
    791 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Advancements in technology have improved most industries, including the construction and engineering sectors.  But could humans eventually find themselves redundant within these work spheres at the expense of technology?  Probably not!  After all, software is usually only as good as the human operating it… Computer-based assistance really is just that: a tool to assist. The successful link between computer programmes and engineering skill varies depending on which part of the AEC industry they are being used in. To understand how this factor can impact their relationship, we must first look at the three main stages of engineering design.  Concept design: At this stage, the majority of the design comes from the imagination of the engineer, supported by some simple sizing elements or calculations. Drafting and analysis: This stage brings the concept design into the real world more earnestly, checking that it is feasible and how it will succeed. This stage is predominantly computer-based, using, for example building design software, which strives to assist engineers work with regards to accuracy. Detailed design: This stage is when, as the name suggests, the design becomes much more detailed. At this point, the design is almost completely computer-based, with analysis happening in the background. It’s likely that such processes will always require an aspect of creativity and imagination — the ability to think outside the box and problem-solve in new ways. But it’s not just the imaginative aspect that machines cannot replicate in full: fine tuning, for example, still needs a guiding human hand in order to ensure the outputs are correct. While leaps and bounds are certainly being made in machine learning, whereby computers can now make decisions based on historical data and records, it is highly unlikely that this will develop to the point where human skill and judgement become obsolete. Naturally, human judgment is not flawless. Mistakes can be made when writing the programmes designed to support design, or further along the line when inputting data into these programmes. Either error will result in an inaccurate output. For this reason, the topic of automated checking — whereby computer programmes will check the input against previous projects and their success or failure — has been a hot point of discussion within the AEC industry lately. However, it is worth bearing in mind that the majority of engineering disasters have occurred due to something unusual; that is, something that has not happened in previous related projects. While rule-checkers help when situations where rules apply, they aren’t able to flag something that hasn’t happened in previous records, i.e. something unusual. There are many examples of such missed errors. For example, the Millennium Bridge’s well-known wobble was not picked up on at any point by the design’s code. Programmes failed to predict the wind instability of Tacoma Narrows. While engineers can make use of a value judgement, computer programmes do not. As the world changes, engineers will make a value judgement to adapt their designs accordingly. In order for both human and technological processes to be as accurate as possible, formulas need to be crafted. There are several structures and designs that have had formulas developed exclusively for them. For example, the original formula creation for shell structures had to be created by expert mathematicians to ensure success. Now, with Finite element Analysis, almost any form can be analysed — but that does not mean these forms are always sensible. There’s a certain amount of tension between architects and engineers surrounding this. Where engineers are seen as wanting functionality, architect are seen as wanting novelty first. But this disparity makes for the perfect partnership towards the best designs.        
    Aug 08, 2019 791

  • For your convenience we have listed 10 of the best “How to plaster a wall” blogs and guides and as we have no affiliations to any individual suppliers, it is for you to decide what works for you. Building Materials Company One of the better guides showing how to plaster a wall in nine easy steps  https://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/knowledge/how-to-plaster-a-wall       2. British Gypsum As one of the country’s leading manufacturers this How to guide is obviously aimed at its own products but also gives a more general guide to all types of plastering and may be better suited to the beginner. https://www.british-gypsum.com/product-range/plaster-products/how-to-plaster         3. Homebuilding and Renovating This is a more interesting guide as it tries to give useful tips covering a range of different plastering challenges. https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/plastering-walls          4. DIY Doctor This website readily acknowledges that plastering can be difficult but concentrates on the finished job, the actual final coat or skim, which obviously has to look flat on completion. https://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/skim.htm           5. Dave’s Tips We like this site as it really tries to appeal to the beginner. Dave is an experienced plasterer and reckons it’s easy – but then it probably is for him. https://www.davesdiytips.com/plastering-for-beginners            6. Able Skills This is a site that assume you have never plastered a wall before and really does get down to the basics. We all know of course it’s not as easy as it’s made out – but well worth a look. https://www.ableskills.co.uk/blog/tutorials/how-to-apply-your-first-coat-of-plaster          7. Real Homes This is advice for those of us who live in old homes. Plastering is a more of a challenge in such buildings and this is where you will get the best tips if you have an older property. https://www.realhomes.com/advice/plaster-in-old-homes          8. The Spruce Keeping on the theme of old homes The Spruce takes it one stage further by discussing plaster and lath. If your home features such walls and ceilings then this is for you. https://www.thespruce.com/plaster-and-lath-came-before-drywall-1822861             9. Artex Ltd Probably one of the biggest plastering challenges and a throwback to all those 80’s style properties this How to guide shows you the best way to plaster over Artex. Good luck. https://www.artexltd.com/repair-hub/plastering-over-artex             10. Dummies Finally in our top 10 and the one that most find easier is a guide to how to repair cracks. These easy to follow instructions are worth a look. https://www.dummies.com/home-garden/walls-ceilings/how-to-fix-small-cracks-in-plaster
    Dec 13, 2018 744
  • Once you have planned where your shed will go you need to make sure you have all the right tools and products to complete the job such as: Pegs and string Building sand Standard cement Timber for base formwork Tape measure Spade Sweeping brush 1. Prepare the base When you do this allow enough distance from hedges or fences for easy access to all sides. Use the pegs and string to mark out a base 2” (5 cm) larger than the area of the building on each side. Make sure the area is square by using a level diagonally across the area 2. Pay attention to the hardcore Ensure that you have at least 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore underneath a 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, dig to a depth of 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs. 3. Make sure it’s level Measure, cut and fit timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Spread the hardcore and cover with a good level of sand. Ensure it is well compacted and flattened using a compacting tool or roller. 4: Next the concrete Mix concrete using one part cement to five parts all-in-one ballast, or use bags of dry-mixed concrete and just add water. Be careful not to add too much water as this may make the cement too runny. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete. In extreme weather conditions – both hot and cold – ensure that you base is covered to allow it to cure slowly, minimising the risk if shrinking or cracking – and there you have it – the perfect base for your new shed. You could of course then decide to build your own shed but as we discussed earlier – why would you want to when there are so many brilliant alternatives that have been prefabricated offsite and ready to be place on your new base. Talk.Build never makes recommendations but as a starting point you might want to visit:  Sheds
    Jul 30, 2018 797
  • We have seen many different types of architectural software over recent years and while it seems that most do very good jobs there have also been many adverse comments that products are not delivering. Understandably most professionals are confused with the wide range of products on offer. Many look at niche options which do not quite hit the mark but with the right software and a modern computer, the entire plan of a building can be rendered and checked for structural and design flaws before it even leaves the drawing board. This is more efficient, less wasteful, and a lot more convenient as well. BIM Modelling has also demanded that architects design and produce in both 2D and 3D and as a result there have been major development in design software which allows professionals to draw and visualise house floor plans more quickly and easily One such company, Elecosoft, seems to have gone further than most with its own bespoke package, “Arcon Evo”, which combines visual design, professional CAD capabilities and clear project execution in a single program. The new software also offers an extensive range of architectural CAD tools for all aspects of building design allowing architects to construct to the smallest level of detail. It also produces detailed plans, automated 3D models, elevations, section details and working drawings and much more. At the front end it will also generate detailed drawing sets for planning applications with many additional features which many of my colleagues in the trade press are endorsing as a major leap forward. To some extent I guess I am doing the same but rather than list all the benefits, which can be seen on the company’s website – the link is featured at the bottom of this article - I am more interested in how architects themselves have responded. In the past, as mentioned earlier, we have seen many different software packages which all claim to bring architects and building professionals into the 21st Century but have failed to deliver when it matters. According to the professionals “Arcon Evo” does exactly what it says on the tin and is more than capable of producing detailed 2D and 3D designs and it seems a whole lot more. Guess it is down to our readers to decide. Visit: www.3darchitect.co.uk
    Jul 26, 2018 1292
  • We Build The Future works to improve support and advice for people who work in the construction and built environment sector who face the challenge of dealing with cancer in their lives. Helping to fund research, which can help accelerate improvements in the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer, the charity aims to promote health and wellbeing across the industry to help reduce the risk of people developing cancer in the first place. CABE’s objective is to promote and advance the knowledge, study and practice of each and all of the arts and sciences concerned with building technology, planning, design, construction, maintenance and repair of the built environment. Further, it aims to create and maintain a high standard of professional qualification, conduct and practice whilst encouraging and facilitating co-operation between the construction professions. With members practising in over 55 countries, the organisation has an extensive reach and it is hoped that over the next 12 months through a number of fund raising activities, money can be raised to help further the work of We Build The Future. Ant Burd, President of CABE said “It is a huge honour for me to be both one of the original trustees of We Build The Future (WBTF) and now the current President of CABE. Given WBTF was specifically set up to support those working in the Built Environment sector it amounts to a perfect fit whereby working with CABE and its 8000+ members we can seek to raise money that will go directly to support and help those in need working within our own sector.” We Build The Future is an official supporter of the world’s biggest cancer charity, Cancer Research UK. This ensures that any funds raised are used to support research whilst ensuring access to expert information and support for people working in the construction and built environment sector. Visit: www.webuildthefuture.org
    Aug 27, 2019 136
  • G-Cloud 11 enables cloud service providers – such as GroupBC – to offer digital, contract-based facilities to public sector organisations, by ensuring suppliers are compliant with, and have met the standards laid out in the G-Cloud framework . Launched in 2012, the initiative has done well to expedite and ease the procurement process, radically changing the route to market for Government departments, agencies, local authorities and education establishments. Divided into three ‘lots’ – cloud hosting, cloud software and cloud support – GroupBC, under the registered name Business Collaborator Ltd), entered into the cloud software (SaaS) category and was once again successful in its application. The G-Cloud service enables GroupBC to continue delivering their leading Project to Asset Information Management Common Data Environment (PIM / AIM CDE) for Clients wanting to securely digitise their estate in order to optimize performance. Speaking on its success, Stuart Bell, Sales and Marketing Director at GroupBC said: “We’re delighted to have again been successful on the G-Cloud framework. In previous years we have been selected by prominent organisations such as Highways England and most recently, University of Birmingham, and look forward to working with more customers who recognise and are enthusiastic about the benefits of digital technologies, and in particular, how the BC CDE underpins the ‘golden thread’ of information throughout their assets lifecycle.” Visit:https://www.digitalmarketplace.service.gov.uk/g-cloud/services/450429126643230
    Jul 31, 2019 209
  • Winners of the 2019 Single Ply Roofing Association (SPRA) Awards were announced on Thursday, June 13th during a ceremony held at Heythrop Park, Oxfordshire. Two projects completed using Sika-Trocal roofing solutions were ‘Highly-Commended’ by industry judges. IPC Church in Ealing, west London, a complex roof installation project carried out by Ithaca Roofing using Sika-Trocal detailing, was ‘Highly Commended for Best Detailing’. Additionally, Lagland Street, a new-build residential development in Poole, Dorset received ‘Highly Commended Best New Build’. The project saw contractors, Volsen, install Sika-Trocal SGK 1.5mm membrane to a mansard roof as part of a system including Sika-Trocal S-Vap 5000E (VCL), and Trocal InnoFix 100mm insulation. Richard Ptiman at Sika-Trocal, said: “The commendations are a wonderful validation of our quality roofing solutions. In conjunction with the superb work carried out by both contractors, we are extremely proud to have received recognition at these esteemed awards.” Sika was one of a number of sponsors to support the 2019 SPRA Awards, the fifth time it has been staged.
    Jul 10, 2019 285
  • The Melody Gardens and Corporation Road projects were designed to increase the number of available affordable homes in Salford. Watson Homes carried out the work on both developments, which were built on behalf of Places for People and ForHousing. For Melody Gardens it involved the building of a four-storey block comprising 48 apartments; nine two-storey houses, and a bungalow. The properties were being built on a 0.4-hectare site once occupied by a Catholic church. Due to the superb reputation of its products and service, Recticel was selected to supply the development’s cavity wall and ground floor insulation. As part of Recticel’s quality PIR range, Eurothane GP, a low-thermal conductivity panel, provided Melody Gardens’ ground floor insulation. With a low-thermal conductivity of 0.022W/mK, the Eurothane GP panel’s dimensional stability and super-flat surface help create homes which excel in terms of comfort and wellbeing. Such a solution is crucial for multiple-occupancy buildings where the risk of damp and increased noise levels is greater than single occupancies. For the buildings’ walls, Eurowall Cavity was installed. The closed-cell, rigid polyisocyanurate foam board helps regulate temperature to create a warm and even interior climate. The use of a residual 50mm clear cavity means Eurowall Cavity may be used in any exposure zone. It’s estimated the Melody Gardens building project will be completed in November 2019. Eurothane GP and Eurowall Cavity were also used as respective floor and wall insulation for the Corporation Gardens project. A total of 2,525m2 of insulation was installed during the development carried out by Watson Homes. It comprises 18, one-bed and 15, two-bed apartments. The easy usability of both products proved essential in ensuring contractors were able to meet the client’s strict deadline and complete building works to the highest specification in May 2018. Mike Watson, Construction Director at Watson Homes, said: “Recticel’s high-quality products were essential to ensuring the fabric of both developments was fitted with insulation that will fulfil the occupants’ long-term domestic needs. In terms of installation, the panels’ easy-fit properties made quicker, lighter work of a potentially challenging project.” The durability and thermal performance facilitated by Eurothane GP and Eurowall Cavity panels will help create damp-free and moisture-free interiors at Melody Gardens and Corporation Road. It will result in these developments becoming a welcome and much-valued addition to Salford’s social housing portfolio. Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Aug 05, 2019 184
  • Located a tranquil distance away from Portsmouth Harbour and a mere 120-minute drive from central London, the Ordnance Yard development in Gosport, Hampshire was delivered by Elite Homes and designed to take the breath away. It features nine, ultra-modern, luxury homes which not only reflect the proud heritage of their surroundings; in terms of style, comfort and sustainability they are dream-living made reality. Ordnance Yard, which resides on the banks of the Priddy’s Hard peninsula, was born following the regeneration of a listed, 200-year-old former munitions depot. It led to a superb selection of contemporary homes being built within enormous blast walls once occupied by shell-filling and emptying rooms which powered Britain’s Victorian and wartime armouries. Sustainably-built using local materials and contractors, these thermally-efficient, open-fronted properties are a metal-clad reminder of the site’s naval heritage and a splendorous innovation in themselves. However, the two elevated houses which bookend the development are its architectural tour-de-force. Clad in a lighter, metal grey, the striking former Trotyl melting room structures appear to symbolise the bold ambition that fuelled the beautiful transformation of this once barren site. Although separated from Portsmouth’s bustling centre by a relatively narrow stretch of water - Forton Lake, an inter-tidal site of Special Scientific Interest and a Special Protection area for birds - Ordnance Yard is a world away from the bump and grind of everyday urban life. The site lies within the Priddy’s Hard Conservation Wildlife Area. From the peninsula’s peaceful shore a seagull’s cry or the muffled bellow of a ship’s horn, as it passes far on the horizon, evoke a tantalisingly-diametric sense of belonging and escape. For this is a place to live, relax, explore and discover; befitting of the modern mantra for residential environments which enhance the health and well-being of occupants. As well as bearing an inspiring aesthetic, the homes are a benchmark for comfortable, sustainable living. Each exceeds building regulation levels for energy performance due to a plethora of carbon-limiting features. An 8kw-capactiy air source heat pump is installed within each property along with windows specifically designed for solar gain. Expert design, augmented by quality workmanship and materials ensure low-level, U-value performance and excellent airtight readings are upheld throughout each of the nine homes.  A standalone development, Ordnance Yard is nonetheless the instigator for the wider regeneration of the Priddy’s Hard site. Future plans include the restoration of other buildings to create more homes as well as an armed forces museum and a gin distillery As Priddy’s Hard gradually returns to life, it’s anticipated many jobs and much investment will follow. As the game changer for the area’s long-term emergence, Ordnance Yard is an exemplar of how architectural vision can be applied to spectacular effect in creating daring, desirable housing developments that live comfortably alongside Britain’s industrial past. Visit: http://elitehomesltd.co.uk/
    Jun 27, 2019 337
  • One of Scotland’s largest regeneration projects, Quartermile is located on the historic 19-acre former site of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Masterplanned by Architects, Foster + Partners, Quartermile is one of the largest and most comprehensive regeneration schemes in Scotland. Combining new build with selective refurbishment. The development provides over 1,000 apartments along with 370,000 sq ft of Grade A office accommodation, 65,000 sq ft of retail and leisure space and seven acres of open landscaping. SIDERISE was approached by Edinburgh based façade specialists Charles Henshaw & Sons for its technical expertise in acoustics to find a bespoke solution that would meet the acoustic performance criteria requirements for Quartermile’s Q20 - Q25 apartment buildings, all of which feature curtain walling. The principal challenge was to achieve an on-site test value in excess of the 53dB DnT,w requirement for Building Regulations in Scotland. The target was 56dB DnT,w. For Henshaw this meant that the façade system, a potential weak point for flanking sound transmission, needed to achieve between 61-66dB Dnf,w flanking via the façade, past the floor slab areas, to exceed building regulations and provide the architect, client and project noise consultant RMP with a solution that offered high acoustic performance and a quality build.  Commenting on the collaborative working relationship with SIDERISE, Design Director Donald Fraser at Henshaw said: “We had very informative and lengthy discussions with Mike Carrick of SIDERISE, who helped us in achieving a far better detail at the slab edge, which not only met with the approval of RMP, it also proved to be the optimum solution.” SIDERISE recommended using its CW-FS 120 curtain wall firestop along with their AB10 acoustic matting solutionand CVB/C10 cavity barrier solution. Used to improve floor-to-floor acoustic performance and form a simple, high performance sound barrier, the acoustic matt was held up with 40mm x 20mm x 1.6mm galvanised angles to stop it sinking. SIDERISE mullion inserts were also specified to further increase the acoustic performance at the critical mullion detail.  “This comprehensive floor detail from SIDERISE has been used at Quartermile to good effect, with all the test data showing it passed and indeed exceeded the target ratio. It’s also extremely quick and easy to install,” added Donald Fraser. Involved in projects throughout the world and having manufactured acoustic and fire insulation products for more than 40 years, SIDERISE offers a large range of tried and tested product enhancements specifically developed for the façade industry. Designed to reduce vertical and horizontal sound transmission in curtain wall buildings, this range includes a choice of effective and proven sound reduction solutions that deal with all common sound path problems and are frequently used to assist in reducing flanking transmission between adjacent internal areas. Visit www.siderise.com
    May 21, 2019 278
  • He began his new role on November 1st, stepping-up from the Marketing Manager’s position he held within Sika roofing. “It’s incredibly exciting to be given this new challenge,” Pete said. “I’m looking forward to bringing some of my background experience and new ideas to the role, as well as being involved in product development and developing strong relationships.“ Having started his Sika career in 2005 within the marketing team for Liquid Plastics, Pete became Marketing Manager for the company’s roofing division in 2014. Pete, 40, whose new, field-based role involves supporting Sika-Trocal’s seven area technical managers, said: It's an ever-changing fast-paced market environment, so being as close to our customers as possible allows us to respond to these changes and give our customers exactly what they need. Sika-Trocal’s fantastic product range gives us a distinct advantage and we’re also fortunate to have a superb team of area mangers who have built-up a brilliant long-term relationship with our customers. This is something we want to continue to nurture”     
    Nov 12, 2019 28
  • This new challenge will see Murray working with contractors, architects and engineers on specification projects that include Sika screed and Sika resin coating solutions for industrial and commercial projects including car parks and deck finishes. Prior to his appointment, Murray worked in the Sika Specialist Distribution team, managing key accounts that support the supply of products for key projects via the distribution supply chain. In total he has been with Sika for more than 10 years, having previously worked at Sika Everbuild. It has enabled him to gain vast specialist sales experience within the construction sector. Murray, who began his Sika Flooring role in September, said:  “The move to Sika Flooring represents a huge opportunity for me. The sector has always interested me. Whether it be the health sector, the food and drink industry or manufacturing, Sika has a flooring solution for a wide range of applications. I’m looking to demonstrate how Sika systems are the number one choice for new-build and refurbishment projects.” Bill Woodham, Sikafloor’s Target Market National Area Manager, said: “We’re delighted to have Murray on board. He has worked extensively in the construction industry and brings with him a wealth of opportunities and contacts. Murray will be joining an evolving team that continuously strives to meet and exceed customer expectations and deliver a best-in-class customer experience. We look forward to Murray building on the success he has already achieved at Sika.”
    Nov 06, 2019 62
  • Gary will oversee the order and despatch operation at VJ Technology’s headquarters in Ashford, Kent. He will manage 30 staff, compromising three supervisors and a team of ‘picking and packing’ operatives. Gary commented, “This is a new and exciting role, which I’m delighted to have taken on. VJ Technology is a growing brand within the construction sector and I’m looking forward to playing a part in its future success.” Prior to joining VJ Technology, Gary was General Manager at the Aylesford office of delivery firm DPD UK. His logistics-based career has also included senior roles at TNT and the Royal Mail. His experience will be critical as VJ Technology is in the process of installing a new state of the art warehouse management system. Designed to optimise orders operations, this transition to a digital-based service, which is expected to be completed by August, will be one of Gary’s initial tasks.    “The management system will facilitate a huge change in the way VJ Technology processes orders,” Gary said. “I’m here to lead staff through the new phase and ensure they have all the support they need. It’s a big challenge for us all, but one we’re well-equipped to meet.  The warehouse management system is another VJ Technology initiative to further streamline our superb customer service offering.”
    May 21, 2019 358