• 20 Sep 2018
    Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to disproportionate costs to the client writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal . When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, for instance, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not-yet weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also invariably put on hold. The accumulative effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers  etc, fulfilling the country’s need for more housing, for example.  Sika-Trocal’s Type S 1.5mm waterproof roof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses specially formulated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. The mechanical-fixing process has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved rapidity is aided by the solvent-welding method devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this method process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding practice, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of burning using this method. Mechanically-fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which help reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises a vapour control layer and insulation, which is held in place by the Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings mean the whole system is mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide such as Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Asda have recently been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new Morrisons store where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in an incredible three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    293 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to disproportionate costs to the client writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal . When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, for instance, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not-yet weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also invariably put on hold. The accumulative effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers  etc, fulfilling the country’s need for more housing, for example.  Sika-Trocal’s Type S 1.5mm waterproof roof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses specially formulated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. The mechanical-fixing process has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved rapidity is aided by the solvent-welding method devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this method process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding practice, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of burning using this method. Mechanically-fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which help reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises a vapour control layer and insulation, which is held in place by the Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings mean the whole system is mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide such as Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Asda have recently been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new Morrisons store where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in an incredible three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    Sep 20, 2018 293
  • 19 Sep 2018
    It makes a difference when it comes to relationships, but having the right chemistry is also a key ingredient in the creation of polyurethane coatings, adhesives, and sealants. Like any good relationship, it’s something you must work hard at in order to achieve the best result. This is why custom chemistry is often seen as one of the best ways to create tailored products that will continually take performance to new levels. So, what is the secret to custom chemistry, and how can it make a difference in a market saturated with so much choice? The secret to any great relationship starts through conversation. As a leading global manufacturer of specialist resin and polymer technologies, Incorez has a team of chemists who listen to their customers, so they can solve their problems. It could be a new resin, or a matter of tweaking an existing formulation. It might be helping a customer achieve the finish they have been wanting, or pass a regulation they have failed for years. Regardless of the requirement, custom chemistry will help improve a customer’s product in the long term. Let’s look at osmotic blistering, a common problem in the coatings industry. Traditional polyurethane coating applications have a slow and haphazard curing process, which allows moisture or humidity to cause unwanted reactions, generating CO2 bubbles. These create pinholes or blisters, which weaken the film integrity, and spoil the finished appearance. The fact that these bubbles occur during the curing process would be seen by many as unavoidable, but oxazolidines speed up curing, and prevent the generation of CO2. In other words, oxazolidine technology will eliminate bubbling during application, helping to preserve aesthetics, and minimise pinhole defects. This ensures a better finish, and improved film integrity. Moisture-triggered chemistry enables curing in all temperatures and humidity conditions, with the same end result – a tougher, more durable film. Chemically related to oxazolidines, Incorez also offers an aldimine latent hardener, Incozol BH, which hydrolyses on exposure to moisture, to give you a reactive amine crosslinker ideally suited for use in high-build polyurethane systems, such as sealants and adhesives. This unique latent curing agent not only speeds up the cure of low NCO-containing prepolymers, but also allows for faster through-cure with no bubbles from the formation of carbon dioxide, giving you a perfectly cured product no matter what the environment. The huge rise in resin flooring has seen customers demand greater levels of performance for specific applications, but much depends on the nature of the amine curing agent. There are many perceived weaknesses of water-based curing agents, one being that they cannot achieve the same performance as solvent-based technology. Incorez has taken performance to a new level, developing a hardener that has good universal compatibility with all epoxy resin types, and addresses fundamental challenges with water-based technology, such as low-temperature cure, blushing, and water resistance. This coupled with physical characteristics such as excellent abrasion and impact resistance, together with high chemical, water and solvent resistance, make Incorez curing agents the perfect choice for user-friendly industrial and decorative concrete floor paints. But, when it comes to customised solutions, there are few technologies that can match waterbased polyurethane dispersions for versatility and performance.  The launch of the Dispurez product range in 2015 was the start of a new era for these waterbased products, delivering high performance with environmentally and user-friendly chemistry.  With the recent addition of a new tough, chemically and hydrolytically stable product, Dispurez 103, the product range offers a great starting point for the development of next generation, high performance products.  However, if these don’t quite suit your needs then our skilled and experienced research team in Preston can go one step further and tailor these to deliver exactly what you want. The search for products that help improve the performance of formulated systems is constantly evolving whatever industry you are in. By working closely with our customers, continually innovating and breaking new ground Incorez can make a real difference where it counts. Visit https://incorez.com/
    336 Posted by Talk. Build
  • It makes a difference when it comes to relationships, but having the right chemistry is also a key ingredient in the creation of polyurethane coatings, adhesives, and sealants. Like any good relationship, it’s something you must work hard at in order to achieve the best result. This is why custom chemistry is often seen as one of the best ways to create tailored products that will continually take performance to new levels. So, what is the secret to custom chemistry, and how can it make a difference in a market saturated with so much choice? The secret to any great relationship starts through conversation. As a leading global manufacturer of specialist resin and polymer technologies, Incorez has a team of chemists who listen to their customers, so they can solve their problems. It could be a new resin, or a matter of tweaking an existing formulation. It might be helping a customer achieve the finish they have been wanting, or pass a regulation they have failed for years. Regardless of the requirement, custom chemistry will help improve a customer’s product in the long term. Let’s look at osmotic blistering, a common problem in the coatings industry. Traditional polyurethane coating applications have a slow and haphazard curing process, which allows moisture or humidity to cause unwanted reactions, generating CO2 bubbles. These create pinholes or blisters, which weaken the film integrity, and spoil the finished appearance. The fact that these bubbles occur during the curing process would be seen by many as unavoidable, but oxazolidines speed up curing, and prevent the generation of CO2. In other words, oxazolidine technology will eliminate bubbling during application, helping to preserve aesthetics, and minimise pinhole defects. This ensures a better finish, and improved film integrity. Moisture-triggered chemistry enables curing in all temperatures and humidity conditions, with the same end result – a tougher, more durable film. Chemically related to oxazolidines, Incorez also offers an aldimine latent hardener, Incozol BH, which hydrolyses on exposure to moisture, to give you a reactive amine crosslinker ideally suited for use in high-build polyurethane systems, such as sealants and adhesives. This unique latent curing agent not only speeds up the cure of low NCO-containing prepolymers, but also allows for faster through-cure with no bubbles from the formation of carbon dioxide, giving you a perfectly cured product no matter what the environment. The huge rise in resin flooring has seen customers demand greater levels of performance for specific applications, but much depends on the nature of the amine curing agent. There are many perceived weaknesses of water-based curing agents, one being that they cannot achieve the same performance as solvent-based technology. Incorez has taken performance to a new level, developing a hardener that has good universal compatibility with all epoxy resin types, and addresses fundamental challenges with water-based technology, such as low-temperature cure, blushing, and water resistance. This coupled with physical characteristics such as excellent abrasion and impact resistance, together with high chemical, water and solvent resistance, make Incorez curing agents the perfect choice for user-friendly industrial and decorative concrete floor paints. But, when it comes to customised solutions, there are few technologies that can match waterbased polyurethane dispersions for versatility and performance.  The launch of the Dispurez product range in 2015 was the start of a new era for these waterbased products, delivering high performance with environmentally and user-friendly chemistry.  With the recent addition of a new tough, chemically and hydrolytically stable product, Dispurez 103, the product range offers a great starting point for the development of next generation, high performance products.  However, if these don’t quite suit your needs then our skilled and experienced research team in Preston can go one step further and tailor these to deliver exactly what you want. The search for products that help improve the performance of formulated systems is constantly evolving whatever industry you are in. By working closely with our customers, continually innovating and breaking new ground Incorez can make a real difference where it counts. Visit https://incorez.com/
    Sep 19, 2018 336
  • 14 Sep 2018
    Attention has been quite rightly focused on fire safety issues in new and existing buildings since the terrible events at Grenfell Tower writes Richard Harral, Technical Director at CABE. It is vital that the problems identified within the Hackitt review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety are addressed, and that the lessons emerging from the public inquiry are studied and learnt from. This will require extensive change in industry culture, custom and practice, procurement and competency, most of which is long overdue and, driven through as these changes must be, will undoubtedly prove to be broadly beneficial in curing many of the industry’s structural ills. As industry and government work to clarify how this change will be implemented, it is vital that time is also given to broader consideration of the value we need to place on our relationship with our built environment both individually and as a society. What would we conclude if the lens of public opinion was focussed on more clearly defining what society should expect the building industry to deliver? Firstly, it is clear that the public expect government and industry to act responsibly in protecting them from harm. Establishing safety is, however, not a static condition - construction is increasingly sophisticated and evolving by necessity at a pace far faster than the historic norm to address rapidly emerging issues of national and global concern which reach beyond fire safety. The overheating issue As the threat of hosepipe bans becomes reality and temperatures continue to remain high through a glorious but parching summer, it must now be clear that the impact of climate change will require the way we shape our built environment to evolve further to protect us better. The risk of overheating is becoming more tangible, and periods of sustained high temperature pose life safety risks to many thousands of people as well as degrading working conditions for many millions in poor performing buildings. The Committee on Climate Change predicts that premature deaths from overheating will increase by two-thirds by the 2020s which places the risks associated with overheating in clear perspective. There is a growing body of evidence to show that the risk of overheating is increasing, especially in new homes, and that the current regulatory checks for overheating contained in the current Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) have fallen behind and need to be updated. Heavy rain amid such dry weather risks flash flooding as water runs off baked ground – but similar extreme weather events also increase the risk of flooding in the non-summer seasons. We need to be sure that the way we design and renovate our buildings provides protection and resilience where these events are likely to occur. Closing the gap We must also continue to look to play our part in limiting climate change by making our buildings more energy efficient. The expectation in the UK’s Climate Change Act is that the entirety of the UK Building Stock is carbon neutral by 2050, a date which no longer feels in the distant future. The well recognised performance gap that exists between the way buildings are intended to perform and the way they perform in practice may be closing but needs to be closed entirely. The reasons for poor performance are numerous, with many potentially energy efficient systems not operating as the designer intended as a result of not been properly checked and signed off. This has only emphasisedthe importance of testing and commissioning to ensure systems actually work at least at the point of handover when new systems are installed. The necessary step change in energy efficiency will also need to be achieved safely. Airtightness is critical to reducing heat loss, but in achieving the desired low levels of leakage, adequate ventilation becomes a critical concern to avoid risk of moisture and condensation (which can cause respiratory problems) and degraded air quality that similarly affects health. Ensuring that we have good indoor air quality requires good design, specification installation and commissioning, and evidence continues to grow that on all counts the industry is struggling to deliver the right performance consistently.Government is currently looking at and considering key changes to both energy and ventilation requirements which is a step in the right direction. Societal changes also need to be properly considered. Our understanding of the impacts on equality resulting from the way we design and manage our buildings, workplaces and public spaces are also changing and it is absolutely right that we now expect places to be inclusive for the widest possible range of users. These are only a few of the areas where the decisions we make as clients, designers, engineers, constructors and operators of buildings are likely to impact on public safety and welfare. Which is why now is the right time to pause and step back to look at the bigger picture. Many of the recommendations from Dame Judith Hackitt’s review are relevant to ensuring the construction industry has the ability to deliver against this wider agenda of health, safety, sustainability and welfare. We have a once in a generation opportunity to move away from bad business models based on lowest price towards an industry that is focused on lifetime value and as a result is more profitable, more productive and more valued for the work it does. Extending many of the Hackitt review’s proposals for structural reform beyond high risk buildings will be key in ensuring that the necessary changes to business practice and culture required to embed this step change in performance take effect. We must also ensure that industry improves its expenditure on research and development to deliver higher levels of confidence in system performance and to support policy makers in making informed decisions. At the same time we should recognise the need to invest more in our people to ensure they are competent and empowered to work in an ethical way. Government clearly has a key role in ensuring that the right regulatory measures are in place to enable industry to meet the wider public expectation that they are adequately protected and to ensure that safety standards are consistently delivered on. Fire safety will rightly be at the forefront of thinking, but as Ministers start the process of reshaping the building safety policy landscape, it is important that they also take into account the broader scope of building regulations and policies that will be needed in the future to keep people safe. Visit www.cbuilde.com
    374 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Attention has been quite rightly focused on fire safety issues in new and existing buildings since the terrible events at Grenfell Tower writes Richard Harral, Technical Director at CABE. It is vital that the problems identified within the Hackitt review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety are addressed, and that the lessons emerging from the public inquiry are studied and learnt from. This will require extensive change in industry culture, custom and practice, procurement and competency, most of which is long overdue and, driven through as these changes must be, will undoubtedly prove to be broadly beneficial in curing many of the industry’s structural ills. As industry and government work to clarify how this change will be implemented, it is vital that time is also given to broader consideration of the value we need to place on our relationship with our built environment both individually and as a society. What would we conclude if the lens of public opinion was focussed on more clearly defining what society should expect the building industry to deliver? Firstly, it is clear that the public expect government and industry to act responsibly in protecting them from harm. Establishing safety is, however, not a static condition - construction is increasingly sophisticated and evolving by necessity at a pace far faster than the historic norm to address rapidly emerging issues of national and global concern which reach beyond fire safety. The overheating issue As the threat of hosepipe bans becomes reality and temperatures continue to remain high through a glorious but parching summer, it must now be clear that the impact of climate change will require the way we shape our built environment to evolve further to protect us better. The risk of overheating is becoming more tangible, and periods of sustained high temperature pose life safety risks to many thousands of people as well as degrading working conditions for many millions in poor performing buildings. The Committee on Climate Change predicts that premature deaths from overheating will increase by two-thirds by the 2020s which places the risks associated with overheating in clear perspective. There is a growing body of evidence to show that the risk of overheating is increasing, especially in new homes, and that the current regulatory checks for overheating contained in the current Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) have fallen behind and need to be updated. Heavy rain amid such dry weather risks flash flooding as water runs off baked ground – but similar extreme weather events also increase the risk of flooding in the non-summer seasons. We need to be sure that the way we design and renovate our buildings provides protection and resilience where these events are likely to occur. Closing the gap We must also continue to look to play our part in limiting climate change by making our buildings more energy efficient. The expectation in the UK’s Climate Change Act is that the entirety of the UK Building Stock is carbon neutral by 2050, a date which no longer feels in the distant future. The well recognised performance gap that exists between the way buildings are intended to perform and the way they perform in practice may be closing but needs to be closed entirely. The reasons for poor performance are numerous, with many potentially energy efficient systems not operating as the designer intended as a result of not been properly checked and signed off. This has only emphasisedthe importance of testing and commissioning to ensure systems actually work at least at the point of handover when new systems are installed. The necessary step change in energy efficiency will also need to be achieved safely. Airtightness is critical to reducing heat loss, but in achieving the desired low levels of leakage, adequate ventilation becomes a critical concern to avoid risk of moisture and condensation (which can cause respiratory problems) and degraded air quality that similarly affects health. Ensuring that we have good indoor air quality requires good design, specification installation and commissioning, and evidence continues to grow that on all counts the industry is struggling to deliver the right performance consistently.Government is currently looking at and considering key changes to both energy and ventilation requirements which is a step in the right direction. Societal changes also need to be properly considered. Our understanding of the impacts on equality resulting from the way we design and manage our buildings, workplaces and public spaces are also changing and it is absolutely right that we now expect places to be inclusive for the widest possible range of users. These are only a few of the areas where the decisions we make as clients, designers, engineers, constructors and operators of buildings are likely to impact on public safety and welfare. Which is why now is the right time to pause and step back to look at the bigger picture. Many of the recommendations from Dame Judith Hackitt’s review are relevant to ensuring the construction industry has the ability to deliver against this wider agenda of health, safety, sustainability and welfare. We have a once in a generation opportunity to move away from bad business models based on lowest price towards an industry that is focused on lifetime value and as a result is more profitable, more productive and more valued for the work it does. Extending many of the Hackitt review’s proposals for structural reform beyond high risk buildings will be key in ensuring that the necessary changes to business practice and culture required to embed this step change in performance take effect. We must also ensure that industry improves its expenditure on research and development to deliver higher levels of confidence in system performance and to support policy makers in making informed decisions. At the same time we should recognise the need to invest more in our people to ensure they are competent and empowered to work in an ethical way. Government clearly has a key role in ensuring that the right regulatory measures are in place to enable industry to meet the wider public expectation that they are adequately protected and to ensure that safety standards are consistently delivered on. Fire safety will rightly be at the forefront of thinking, but as Ministers start the process of reshaping the building safety policy landscape, it is important that they also take into account the broader scope of building regulations and policies that will be needed in the future to keep people safe. Visit www.cbuilde.com
    Sep 14, 2018 374
  • 12 Sep 2018
    Flooring in schools isn’t just a necessary part of a building’s fabric; it can help create the ideal learning environment in which children can thrive. Design and specification is key, however, to a floor living up to expectation in terms of performance.  Durability ought to be a major factor in the surface selection process, as flooring installed in schools and places of higher education will need to withstand a huge amount of footfall during its lifetime. Maintenance or repairs to damaged flooring could leave a large hole in a school or education authority’s budget; unnecessary expenditure when councils, in particular, are having to tighten the purse strings like never before. No slip-ups Health and safety standards are another prime aspect when it comes to floor selection. A non-slip surface is essential to minimising falls and potential injury. Even wet flooring, caused by outdoor-to-indoor foot traffic or spillages, should remain non-slip. In densely-populated interior spaces, such as schools and higher education establishments, hygiene is paramount. Infection and disease can spread like wildfire in such areas, therefore flooring that is smooth and easy to clean is critical. Colour science When it comes to design, school flooring should be selected for its inspirational qualities as well as its practical properties. The colour of interior walls and floors, for example, is scientifically proven to affect people’s mood and behavior. Red is known to inspire anger and aggression whilst shades of green can instill a sense of calm and tranquility. Patterns or logos can be incorporated into modern flooring design, presenting an opportunity for schools to display its motto or a particularly inspiring image. Suits you In schools, it’s possible that each floor will have a different set of requirements depending on the area of learning. A woodwork class, for instance, might be suited to a surface specifically designed to withstand heavy machinery, whilst flooring highly-resistant to corrosive liquids would be ideal for a science lab. Lifecycle benefits Traditionally, the default flooring materials specified for educational facilities have been vinyl or linoleum sheet flooring. Compared to polyurethane resin floor systems - which are widely used in northern Europe - the lifecycle of sheet materials is short, generally lasting between five and 10 years before being consigned to landfill. In contrast, Sika's (polyurethane) Comfort Floor system has a lifecycle of 40 years. Of its many benefits, Sika Comfort Floor - in the event of damage – can be seamlessly spot repaired, rather than replaced. Unlike sheet materials, which have joints where bacteria can build-up over time, Comfort Floor’s super-smooth finish facilitates a rapid and simple cleaning regime, minimising the threat of germs and infection-spread. Resin systems are also extremely simple to install, in a process that takes just three days to complete. As the 21st century proceeds, so the demand for epoxy resin flooring, with its abundant qualities, will increase. Its new technologies are helping take flooring to exciting places in terms of design without compromise to its core properties – smoothness, strength and durability for the safety and comfort of youngsters during their school years. Visit www.sika.co.uk .
    328 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Flooring in schools isn’t just a necessary part of a building’s fabric; it can help create the ideal learning environment in which children can thrive. Design and specification is key, however, to a floor living up to expectation in terms of performance.  Durability ought to be a major factor in the surface selection process, as flooring installed in schools and places of higher education will need to withstand a huge amount of footfall during its lifetime. Maintenance or repairs to damaged flooring could leave a large hole in a school or education authority’s budget; unnecessary expenditure when councils, in particular, are having to tighten the purse strings like never before. No slip-ups Health and safety standards are another prime aspect when it comes to floor selection. A non-slip surface is essential to minimising falls and potential injury. Even wet flooring, caused by outdoor-to-indoor foot traffic or spillages, should remain non-slip. In densely-populated interior spaces, such as schools and higher education establishments, hygiene is paramount. Infection and disease can spread like wildfire in such areas, therefore flooring that is smooth and easy to clean is critical. Colour science When it comes to design, school flooring should be selected for its inspirational qualities as well as its practical properties. The colour of interior walls and floors, for example, is scientifically proven to affect people’s mood and behavior. Red is known to inspire anger and aggression whilst shades of green can instill a sense of calm and tranquility. Patterns or logos can be incorporated into modern flooring design, presenting an opportunity for schools to display its motto or a particularly inspiring image. Suits you In schools, it’s possible that each floor will have a different set of requirements depending on the area of learning. A woodwork class, for instance, might be suited to a surface specifically designed to withstand heavy machinery, whilst flooring highly-resistant to corrosive liquids would be ideal for a science lab. Lifecycle benefits Traditionally, the default flooring materials specified for educational facilities have been vinyl or linoleum sheet flooring. Compared to polyurethane resin floor systems - which are widely used in northern Europe - the lifecycle of sheet materials is short, generally lasting between five and 10 years before being consigned to landfill. In contrast, Sika's (polyurethane) Comfort Floor system has a lifecycle of 40 years. Of its many benefits, Sika Comfort Floor - in the event of damage – can be seamlessly spot repaired, rather than replaced. Unlike sheet materials, which have joints where bacteria can build-up over time, Comfort Floor’s super-smooth finish facilitates a rapid and simple cleaning regime, minimising the threat of germs and infection-spread. Resin systems are also extremely simple to install, in a process that takes just three days to complete. As the 21st century proceeds, so the demand for epoxy resin flooring, with its abundant qualities, will increase. Its new technologies are helping take flooring to exciting places in terms of design without compromise to its core properties – smoothness, strength and durability for the safety and comfort of youngsters during their school years. Visit www.sika.co.uk .
    Sep 12, 2018 328
  • 11 Sep 2018
    Now that students have opened their A level and GCSE results, it brings a fresh reminder that the construction sector is facing a major skills challenge writes Kevin Bohea. Government has pledged to deliver 300,000 new homes a year by the mid-2020s. The issue we have is that we simply don’t have a workforce to achieve this. The sector is also facing questions over the quality to which we build. So what do we need to do to make sure we have a skilled workforce that can deliver high quality buildings that are fit for purpose? The big challenge is that many people perceive the construction industry as an outdated, uninspiring and manual work based sector- to these people it simply doesn’t seem like a attractive sector in which to find an exciting career. However, for those that work in the sector we know that that couldn’t be further from the truth. The construction sector is exciting, varied, constantly evolving and full of opportunity. In June, the Government launched the Construction Skills Fund. Part of the government's National Retraining Scheme in England, the scheme aims to support innovative ways of training new entrants and retraining adults in areas for which public funding is not available.It will fund on-site training to allow learners to apply their knowledge in the real-world. The £22 million fund is being administered and implemented by CITB and will run for 18 months. The plan is that employers, housing associations and other interested bodies such as LEPs and local authorities submit expressions of interest. From these submissions, 20 on-site training hubs will be created. This will be on major construction project across England and will provide work experience and placements for people working to join the industry. On the face of it this seems like a great idea – offering real hand on work experience for young people as well as opportunities for returning adults and those looking for a pathway for a career switch. But does it go far enough to address the bigger issue – that is making the industry appealing for people to want to join in the first place? We still need to overcome our outdated image. Recticel has created a graduate development programme and a graduate intern programme to help introduce young talent to industry. As a company we invest time engaging with young people to help them understand what we can offer as a business and how a step with us could lead them on to a really fulfilling career in the construction sector. And it’s working. We have a growing intake of young people who are excited the sector offers and who are enthusiastic to learn. I’m confident that once young people start working in the construction they will get a completely different opinion of it. And – as many of us can relate to – once you start work in the construction sector, you very rarely leave. You may go on to take up different roles (one of the advantages of a diverse sector) but it is unlikely you will change sectors completely. The Construction Skills Fund is a step in the right direction although I would be interested to understand what happens after the 18 month period - I just hope it isn’t canned in favor of another Government initiative. We can’t keep having one step forward, one step backwards. Skills is a shared responsibility. If we get it right we can deliver the ambitious targets we have been set and at the same time take a big step forward in terms of improving built quality. Recticel will continue to play its part in attracting the next generation, as well as those returning to work or looking for a career change and I hope that the rest of sector will continue to keep reminding young people construction can be highly rewarding. Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    265 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Now that students have opened their A level and GCSE results, it brings a fresh reminder that the construction sector is facing a major skills challenge writes Kevin Bohea. Government has pledged to deliver 300,000 new homes a year by the mid-2020s. The issue we have is that we simply don’t have a workforce to achieve this. The sector is also facing questions over the quality to which we build. So what do we need to do to make sure we have a skilled workforce that can deliver high quality buildings that are fit for purpose? The big challenge is that many people perceive the construction industry as an outdated, uninspiring and manual work based sector- to these people it simply doesn’t seem like a attractive sector in which to find an exciting career. However, for those that work in the sector we know that that couldn’t be further from the truth. The construction sector is exciting, varied, constantly evolving and full of opportunity. In June, the Government launched the Construction Skills Fund. Part of the government's National Retraining Scheme in England, the scheme aims to support innovative ways of training new entrants and retraining adults in areas for which public funding is not available.It will fund on-site training to allow learners to apply their knowledge in the real-world. The £22 million fund is being administered and implemented by CITB and will run for 18 months. The plan is that employers, housing associations and other interested bodies such as LEPs and local authorities submit expressions of interest. From these submissions, 20 on-site training hubs will be created. This will be on major construction project across England and will provide work experience and placements for people working to join the industry. On the face of it this seems like a great idea – offering real hand on work experience for young people as well as opportunities for returning adults and those looking for a pathway for a career switch. But does it go far enough to address the bigger issue – that is making the industry appealing for people to want to join in the first place? We still need to overcome our outdated image. Recticel has created a graduate development programme and a graduate intern programme to help introduce young talent to industry. As a company we invest time engaging with young people to help them understand what we can offer as a business and how a step with us could lead them on to a really fulfilling career in the construction sector. And it’s working. We have a growing intake of young people who are excited the sector offers and who are enthusiastic to learn. I’m confident that once young people start working in the construction they will get a completely different opinion of it. And – as many of us can relate to – once you start work in the construction sector, you very rarely leave. You may go on to take up different roles (one of the advantages of a diverse sector) but it is unlikely you will change sectors completely. The Construction Skills Fund is a step in the right direction although I would be interested to understand what happens after the 18 month period - I just hope it isn’t canned in favor of another Government initiative. We can’t keep having one step forward, one step backwards. Skills is a shared responsibility. If we get it right we can deliver the ambitious targets we have been set and at the same time take a big step forward in terms of improving built quality. Recticel will continue to play its part in attracting the next generation, as well as those returning to work or looking for a career change and I hope that the rest of sector will continue to keep reminding young people construction can be highly rewarding. Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Sep 11, 2018 265
  • 07 Sep 2018
    It is high time the misconceptions surrounding renewable energy were demystified. With the effects of climate change a pressing concern, now more than ever it is important to turn to renewable energy resources, such as solar energy, to preserve our planet. Andrew Knapp addresses the top five misconceptions surrounding renewable solar energy, offering insight into how eco-friendly energy is a cost-efficient, effective and secure investment for the future. ‘Renewable energy is unaffordable’ This is probably the most important myth to debunk. So many people repel at the idea of installing renewable energy systems, even when the products are a safe and cost-effective solution. In fact, solar energy is actually cheaper than coal and nuclear energy. It is even said that, in time renewable energy will gradually become cheaper than gas. In 2016, the World Economic Forum (WEF) reported that solar and wind energy is now cheaper than fossil fuels in more than 30 countries It is inefficient and unreliable It is a common misconception that solar energy just needs sun to function. Many people believe solar panels do not work when the weather is bad; this is false. Solar energy will still convert 10-25% energy on a cloudy day, which means it is still being productive even when the sun is not shining. It will decrease the value of property Solar panels can actually add value to your home which will in essence futureproof it. They can do this firstly, by raising the home’s EPC (energy performance certificate) grade, which can have a significant effect on house values. Not only this but solar pv can increase your homes appeal via the Feed-In-Tariff, which is an ongoing payment the government offers homeowners for creating clean, renewable energy. This will provide you with an extra income and an attractive prospect for any future buyer. Solar Panels require no maintenance As long as you are using a reliable and credited manufacturer, your solar power system will never give you a headache. Companies such as Ecolution, which install PV panels and energy storage systems, provide an annual service including: quality check, performance and safety checks. The maintenance process is uncomplicated, easy and worth its cost. Excess energy goes to waste As mentioned above, there are some companies which provide smart energy storage systems, allowing you to convert renewable energy and use it at another time. It means you can control your own energy supply and resources, without being chained to the big energy suppliers. These systems are completely functional and reliable; you have the ability to utilise your own energy. As these systems store energy, you will ultimately reduce your carbon footprint and total energy bills. Not only do you save the environment, you save the pennies too. Hopefully, these five myths have demystified what seems to be quite a hazy topic. Most people lack the information to pass judgement on renewable resources; it has this stigma of only attracting the wealthy, planet-conscious people. However, as the demand continues to grow, prices will become more attainable for the majority – it is just part of the process. And as products, such as energy storage systems, infiltrate into the public eye, people will recognise the benefits of this cost-effective and reliable energy solution. Renewable energy, whether wind or solar, is paving the way towards a climate-friendly future. Visit: www.ecolutiongroup.com
    335 Posted by Talk. Build
  • It is high time the misconceptions surrounding renewable energy were demystified. With the effects of climate change a pressing concern, now more than ever it is important to turn to renewable energy resources, such as solar energy, to preserve our planet. Andrew Knapp addresses the top five misconceptions surrounding renewable solar energy, offering insight into how eco-friendly energy is a cost-efficient, effective and secure investment for the future. ‘Renewable energy is unaffordable’ This is probably the most important myth to debunk. So many people repel at the idea of installing renewable energy systems, even when the products are a safe and cost-effective solution. In fact, solar energy is actually cheaper than coal and nuclear energy. It is even said that, in time renewable energy will gradually become cheaper than gas. In 2016, the World Economic Forum (WEF) reported that solar and wind energy is now cheaper than fossil fuels in more than 30 countries It is inefficient and unreliable It is a common misconception that solar energy just needs sun to function. Many people believe solar panels do not work when the weather is bad; this is false. Solar energy will still convert 10-25% energy on a cloudy day, which means it is still being productive even when the sun is not shining. It will decrease the value of property Solar panels can actually add value to your home which will in essence futureproof it. They can do this firstly, by raising the home’s EPC (energy performance certificate) grade, which can have a significant effect on house values. Not only this but solar pv can increase your homes appeal via the Feed-In-Tariff, which is an ongoing payment the government offers homeowners for creating clean, renewable energy. This will provide you with an extra income and an attractive prospect for any future buyer. Solar Panels require no maintenance As long as you are using a reliable and credited manufacturer, your solar power system will never give you a headache. Companies such as Ecolution, which install PV panels and energy storage systems, provide an annual service including: quality check, performance and safety checks. The maintenance process is uncomplicated, easy and worth its cost. Excess energy goes to waste As mentioned above, there are some companies which provide smart energy storage systems, allowing you to convert renewable energy and use it at another time. It means you can control your own energy supply and resources, without being chained to the big energy suppliers. These systems are completely functional and reliable; you have the ability to utilise your own energy. As these systems store energy, you will ultimately reduce your carbon footprint and total energy bills. Not only do you save the environment, you save the pennies too. Hopefully, these five myths have demystified what seems to be quite a hazy topic. Most people lack the information to pass judgement on renewable resources; it has this stigma of only attracting the wealthy, planet-conscious people. However, as the demand continues to grow, prices will become more attainable for the majority – it is just part of the process. And as products, such as energy storage systems, infiltrate into the public eye, people will recognise the benefits of this cost-effective and reliable energy solution. Renewable energy, whether wind or solar, is paving the way towards a climate-friendly future. Visit: www.ecolutiongroup.com
    Sep 07, 2018 335
  • 05 Sep 2018
    The waterproofing of existing below ground structures, particularly ageing ones, needs as much careful planning as a new-build project in terms of materials and process writes Stuart Benham. System options, however, tend to be more limited when it comes to putting a watertight seal on a basement or belowground area already in use. In general, two systems are up for consideration as far as waterproof refurbishment is concerned. A Firstly a waterproof render solution, such as BBA approved Sika-1 Pre-bagged Structural Waterproofing System, is one popular option. This consists of a 3 coat render system for use on walls and overhead surfaces, and a screed system for use on the floor. Sika-1 pre-bagged ensures specifiers meet the requirements of a waterproofing project without the need for ongoing maintenance. The pre-bag system is factory-controlled quality, with each layer to the optimum mix ratio. Site batched versions should not be considered as the quality cannot be relied upon. Cavity drain systems are also popular with retrofit waterproof installers. Sika® CD – Cavity Drainage System, for instance, controls water after it has penetrated a structure. Loose-laid  for flooring applications and attached to a wall with surface plugs in vertical installations, Sika® CD - Cavity Drainage System directs penetrating water into a drainage system and a collection sump before using a pump to discharge water from the building. This is also a proven, reliable system, but unlike the pre-bagged option, the cavity drainage system requires maintenance programme which at a minimum is annual A combination of both is also an option often used. Early intervention Existing fissures and cracks in the structure should be addressed at the earliest opportunity. Left untreated, defects could potentially lead to greater issues and costly, time-consuming repair. Failure to make good the structure at the earliest stage of deterioration could also affect the overall structural integrity of the building, which in-turn may adversely affect any waterproofing system installed. For manufacturers, a key aspect of retrofit waterproofing is interaction and compatibility between different waterproofing interfaces. It’s a challenge Sika is able to meet, as it offers Type A, B and C systems - A (barrier protection); B (structurally integral protection); C (drained protection) - each of which can connect to form the highest-quality waterproof solution. As a full range provider, Sika is able to offer unbiased advice and tailor the solution to the requirement, thus avoiding specifying solutions unsuitable for the product. As for contractors, the challenge is to ensure installation teams are sufficiently-skilled to correctly fit the waterproofing system. Through toolbox talks and site visits, Sika is able to offer full, technical support to installers. This is a value-added service which comes at no extra cost. In addition, contractors are able to obtain official recognition of their skills by becoming a ‘Sika-approved’ installer of as the  Sika-1 Pre-bagged system where candidates are vetted, trained and assessed before being given registered status. As well as having access to on and off-site technical support.  Only Sika 1 Registered contractors benefit from the Sika guarantee on the Sika 1 pre-bag product. With Sika Cavity drain systems, it is always best to use a specialist waterproofing contractor, but if the works are being done by a general contractor, Sika do offer site tool box talks and on site support as part of the guarantee process. At your service In terms of the specifier, the biggest challenge is ensuring the specified waterproofing product is fit for purpose and meets the required performance level. This is where - once again - Sika’s service offering comes to the fore. The company not only provides a range of watertight solutions for a host of concrete applications, its CSSW-qualified specification managers have a wealth of experience to offer expert guidance to ensure products are fit for purpose, specified and installed correctly. This helps ensure projects are completed successfully. Sika can also recommend specialist contractors for a particular scheme, whilst its guaranteed BBA-certified products assure users that they are in possession of goods of the optimum quality.  Visit www.sika.co.uk.
    322 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The waterproofing of existing below ground structures, particularly ageing ones, needs as much careful planning as a new-build project in terms of materials and process writes Stuart Benham. System options, however, tend to be more limited when it comes to putting a watertight seal on a basement or belowground area already in use. In general, two systems are up for consideration as far as waterproof refurbishment is concerned. A Firstly a waterproof render solution, such as BBA approved Sika-1 Pre-bagged Structural Waterproofing System, is one popular option. This consists of a 3 coat render system for use on walls and overhead surfaces, and a screed system for use on the floor. Sika-1 pre-bagged ensures specifiers meet the requirements of a waterproofing project without the need for ongoing maintenance. The pre-bag system is factory-controlled quality, with each layer to the optimum mix ratio. Site batched versions should not be considered as the quality cannot be relied upon. Cavity drain systems are also popular with retrofit waterproof installers. Sika® CD – Cavity Drainage System, for instance, controls water after it has penetrated a structure. Loose-laid  for flooring applications and attached to a wall with surface plugs in vertical installations, Sika® CD - Cavity Drainage System directs penetrating water into a drainage system and a collection sump before using a pump to discharge water from the building. This is also a proven, reliable system, but unlike the pre-bagged option, the cavity drainage system requires maintenance programme which at a minimum is annual A combination of both is also an option often used. Early intervention Existing fissures and cracks in the structure should be addressed at the earliest opportunity. Left untreated, defects could potentially lead to greater issues and costly, time-consuming repair. Failure to make good the structure at the earliest stage of deterioration could also affect the overall structural integrity of the building, which in-turn may adversely affect any waterproofing system installed. For manufacturers, a key aspect of retrofit waterproofing is interaction and compatibility between different waterproofing interfaces. It’s a challenge Sika is able to meet, as it offers Type A, B and C systems - A (barrier protection); B (structurally integral protection); C (drained protection) - each of which can connect to form the highest-quality waterproof solution. As a full range provider, Sika is able to offer unbiased advice and tailor the solution to the requirement, thus avoiding specifying solutions unsuitable for the product. As for contractors, the challenge is to ensure installation teams are sufficiently-skilled to correctly fit the waterproofing system. Through toolbox talks and site visits, Sika is able to offer full, technical support to installers. This is a value-added service which comes at no extra cost. In addition, contractors are able to obtain official recognition of their skills by becoming a ‘Sika-approved’ installer of as the  Sika-1 Pre-bagged system where candidates are vetted, trained and assessed before being given registered status. As well as having access to on and off-site technical support.  Only Sika 1 Registered contractors benefit from the Sika guarantee on the Sika 1 pre-bag product. With Sika Cavity drain systems, it is always best to use a specialist waterproofing contractor, but if the works are being done by a general contractor, Sika do offer site tool box talks and on site support as part of the guarantee process. At your service In terms of the specifier, the biggest challenge is ensuring the specified waterproofing product is fit for purpose and meets the required performance level. This is where - once again - Sika’s service offering comes to the fore. The company not only provides a range of watertight solutions for a host of concrete applications, its CSSW-qualified specification managers have a wealth of experience to offer expert guidance to ensure products are fit for purpose, specified and installed correctly. This helps ensure projects are completed successfully. Sika can also recommend specialist contractors for a particular scheme, whilst its guaranteed BBA-certified products assure users that they are in possession of goods of the optimum quality.  Visit www.sika.co.uk.
    Sep 05, 2018 322
  • 31 Aug 2018
    The UK may be experiencing one of the driest summers on record but the thought of flooding should not be far from people’s minds.  Flooding is not restricted to the winter months.  A parched landscape results in dry, compacted soils that will mean any rainfall is less easily absorbed into the ground. This will only increase the likelihood of flooding if the country experiences storms. With recent years showing us all the devastating effects that floods can have on people’s lives, we need to consider how we build new homes to address this risk. Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) offer developers and housebuilders a way to manage excess stormwater on their developments. The pressing need for more homes has only led to us to build on flood plains and urbanise our green spaces. As these developments go ahead, there is a knock-on effect as we have less land for rainfall to be able to soak away into the ground. It’s imperative that water is managed where it falls, reducing the demand on built drainage and the sewerage infrastructure. Planning guidance requires all major new housing developments of 10 houses or more to incorporate SuDS for the management of surface water run-off. However this doesn’t apply to smaller developments or the retrofitting of SuDS in urban environments. An integrated flood prevention solution By taking a SuDS approach to managing water, housebuilders and developers can manage the risk of surface flooding, integrating these solutions into developments, whilst at the same time influencing other aspects of the site and reducing impermeable areas wherever possible. Sustainable drainage mimics natural drainage processes by allowing rainfall to soak into the ground where possible or by delaying discharges. Reducing both the volume and rate of surface water run-off to sewers and watercourses, this helps to improve water quality, ecology and amenity value of watercourses. It is important, however, to remember that there is no single drainage solution for any one site. There are a number of options from natural above ground SuDS solutions including swales, detention ponds, basins and permeable surfaces, to engineered solutions such as concrete culverts, plastic pipes, attenuation tanks and soakaways. Faced with rising costs and stricter deadlines, modularisation is growing in popularity as contractors look to find the next generation of efficient and economical products and systems. Due to the numerous benefits both on and off site, underground modular geocellular units such as StormCrate from Brett Martin Plumbing and Drainage have become an increasingly popular choice at every stage of the supply chain, from the architect and specifier to the contractor and client. Modular and stackable Weighing in at only 18kg per module and measuring 1200mm x 600mm x 420mm, the StormCrate modular units can be easily lifted by hand and then laid or stacked in rows. The units are suitable for a range of applications including residential, commercial and industrial projects. StormCrates can either be wrapped in a geotextile, which allows stored water to slowly seep into the surrounding ground and back into the water table, or a more common practice, wrapped in an impermeable geomembrane to create a sealed underground tank.  The outlet from this tank is then controlled to facilitate a slow release of the stored water back into the drainage system over a longer period. Manufactured from recycled plastic, StormCrates have a high void ratio of 95% which means that the units are highly efficient at storing up to 300 litres of water in the event of heavy rains. If inspectability is required for future maintenance, then Brett Martin can offer StormCrate Inspect Crates. There are no limits on the use and design of the surface over the system and StormCrates may be successfully installed under parking areas, driveways and landscaped areas. Ideal for domestic soakaways, only 250mm of cover is required above the crates for driveway applications, which results in less dig and site spoil.  When a minimum of 500mm cover is used, the high strength crate has a lorry bearing capacity of 60 tonnes. Managing a storm For a new housing development in Coventry, surface water management was a key consideration to prevent any future flooding, hence Brett Martin’s StormCrates were used to create an underground attenuation tank for the temporary storage of stormwater, reducing the demand on built drainage. The development of 15 new homes - a mixture of two, three and four-bed semi-detached terraced and detached houses – was built on an area which is susceptible to flooding.  In order to manage rainwater within the site and prevent flooding during periods of bad weather, contractor O’Flanagan Homes, required a drainage solution that could be integrated within the site and found the solution in StormCrate.    Brett Martin provided O’Flanagan Homes with 180 StormCrates which were used to create a 54.5m3 underground storage tank, constructed in three layers at a depth of 2 metres beneath the entrance road, to offset stormwater run-off from the developed area.  Commenting on the installation, Danny O‘Flanagan of O’Flanagan Homes commented: “We have used StormCrates on other projects and they are an ideal solution for managing stormwater run-off.  Lightweight, easy to move and incredibly strong, we used them to create an underground tank beneath the permeable paving in the entrance road of the development.” The use of StormCrates from Brett Martin Plumbing and Drainage ensured this new housing development had a proven rainwater attenuation solution which will reduce demand on built drainage and the sewerage infrastructure. Visit: www.brettmartin.com
    271 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The UK may be experiencing one of the driest summers on record but the thought of flooding should not be far from people’s minds.  Flooding is not restricted to the winter months.  A parched landscape results in dry, compacted soils that will mean any rainfall is less easily absorbed into the ground. This will only increase the likelihood of flooding if the country experiences storms. With recent years showing us all the devastating effects that floods can have on people’s lives, we need to consider how we build new homes to address this risk. Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) offer developers and housebuilders a way to manage excess stormwater on their developments. The pressing need for more homes has only led to us to build on flood plains and urbanise our green spaces. As these developments go ahead, there is a knock-on effect as we have less land for rainfall to be able to soak away into the ground. It’s imperative that water is managed where it falls, reducing the demand on built drainage and the sewerage infrastructure. Planning guidance requires all major new housing developments of 10 houses or more to incorporate SuDS for the management of surface water run-off. However this doesn’t apply to smaller developments or the retrofitting of SuDS in urban environments. An integrated flood prevention solution By taking a SuDS approach to managing water, housebuilders and developers can manage the risk of surface flooding, integrating these solutions into developments, whilst at the same time influencing other aspects of the site and reducing impermeable areas wherever possible. Sustainable drainage mimics natural drainage processes by allowing rainfall to soak into the ground where possible or by delaying discharges. Reducing both the volume and rate of surface water run-off to sewers and watercourses, this helps to improve water quality, ecology and amenity value of watercourses. It is important, however, to remember that there is no single drainage solution for any one site. There are a number of options from natural above ground SuDS solutions including swales, detention ponds, basins and permeable surfaces, to engineered solutions such as concrete culverts, plastic pipes, attenuation tanks and soakaways. Faced with rising costs and stricter deadlines, modularisation is growing in popularity as contractors look to find the next generation of efficient and economical products and systems. Due to the numerous benefits both on and off site, underground modular geocellular units such as StormCrate from Brett Martin Plumbing and Drainage have become an increasingly popular choice at every stage of the supply chain, from the architect and specifier to the contractor and client. Modular and stackable Weighing in at only 18kg per module and measuring 1200mm x 600mm x 420mm, the StormCrate modular units can be easily lifted by hand and then laid or stacked in rows. The units are suitable for a range of applications including residential, commercial and industrial projects. StormCrates can either be wrapped in a geotextile, which allows stored water to slowly seep into the surrounding ground and back into the water table, or a more common practice, wrapped in an impermeable geomembrane to create a sealed underground tank.  The outlet from this tank is then controlled to facilitate a slow release of the stored water back into the drainage system over a longer period. Manufactured from recycled plastic, StormCrates have a high void ratio of 95% which means that the units are highly efficient at storing up to 300 litres of water in the event of heavy rains. If inspectability is required for future maintenance, then Brett Martin can offer StormCrate Inspect Crates. There are no limits on the use and design of the surface over the system and StormCrates may be successfully installed under parking areas, driveways and landscaped areas. Ideal for domestic soakaways, only 250mm of cover is required above the crates for driveway applications, which results in less dig and site spoil.  When a minimum of 500mm cover is used, the high strength crate has a lorry bearing capacity of 60 tonnes. Managing a storm For a new housing development in Coventry, surface water management was a key consideration to prevent any future flooding, hence Brett Martin’s StormCrates were used to create an underground attenuation tank for the temporary storage of stormwater, reducing the demand on built drainage. The development of 15 new homes - a mixture of two, three and four-bed semi-detached terraced and detached houses – was built on an area which is susceptible to flooding.  In order to manage rainwater within the site and prevent flooding during periods of bad weather, contractor O’Flanagan Homes, required a drainage solution that could be integrated within the site and found the solution in StormCrate.    Brett Martin provided O’Flanagan Homes with 180 StormCrates which were used to create a 54.5m3 underground storage tank, constructed in three layers at a depth of 2 metres beneath the entrance road, to offset stormwater run-off from the developed area.  Commenting on the installation, Danny O‘Flanagan of O’Flanagan Homes commented: “We have used StormCrates on other projects and they are an ideal solution for managing stormwater run-off.  Lightweight, easy to move and incredibly strong, we used them to create an underground tank beneath the permeable paving in the entrance road of the development.” The use of StormCrates from Brett Martin Plumbing and Drainage ensured this new housing development had a proven rainwater attenuation solution which will reduce demand on built drainage and the sewerage infrastructure. Visit: www.brettmartin.com
    Aug 31, 2018 271
  • 30 Aug 2018
    When a façade is constructed, the insulation used for fire, thermal and acoustic performance is often hidden so its impact from a building control point of view is very difficult to see writes  William McDowell, Business Development & Product Manager, SIDERISE. Whether the insulation is there or not, it is extremely hard to determine if it has been installed correctly. Building control therefore has an unenviable task to ensure buildings comply with building regulations and local agreements.   One of the biggest difficulties is that building control officers are covering a wide range of building performance criteria. Materials are constantly evolving and enter the marketplace on a frequent basis while challenging designs are commonplace. This means that building control are presented on a daily basis with situations that they don’t 100% know. Invariably, they default to a very conservative position.  If ‘x’ is required then they won’t move from that standpoint even if there is a good argument to suggest that allowance needs to be made. Understandably, they end up being very conservative in their approach and only react on the information they have. To help building control, it’s very important that manufacturers of building products are able to technically support their products with a great deal of knowledge and a comprehensive database supported by appropriate and current test data. If building control were to speak to the technical team at SIDERISE for example, they can respond with confidence and knowledge, to help steer them toward a sensible conclusion.  Building control officers won’t be swayed by a salesperson; they will be speaking to a technical expert who can show them they understand the application. They can demonstrate they have the appropriate technical knowledge and test data to support the argument which in turn can help building control move towards a viable decision. Furthermore, manufacturers have a responsibility to demonstrate how to use their products by offering installer’s toolbox talks and providing product literature that demonstrates how products should be correctly used. It’s not uncommon to learn that someone has installed something incorrectly because they didn’t know how to install it in the first place. With building regulations lagging behind the development of new materials and their impact on design, it has become increasingly important for manufacturers of construction products to provide advice and assistance at every stage of a project’s process, from conception through to construction and after. Visit: www.siderise.com
    309 Posted by Talk. Build
  • When a façade is constructed, the insulation used for fire, thermal and acoustic performance is often hidden so its impact from a building control point of view is very difficult to see writes  William McDowell, Business Development & Product Manager, SIDERISE. Whether the insulation is there or not, it is extremely hard to determine if it has been installed correctly. Building control therefore has an unenviable task to ensure buildings comply with building regulations and local agreements.   One of the biggest difficulties is that building control officers are covering a wide range of building performance criteria. Materials are constantly evolving and enter the marketplace on a frequent basis while challenging designs are commonplace. This means that building control are presented on a daily basis with situations that they don’t 100% know. Invariably, they default to a very conservative position.  If ‘x’ is required then they won’t move from that standpoint even if there is a good argument to suggest that allowance needs to be made. Understandably, they end up being very conservative in their approach and only react on the information they have. To help building control, it’s very important that manufacturers of building products are able to technically support their products with a great deal of knowledge and a comprehensive database supported by appropriate and current test data. If building control were to speak to the technical team at SIDERISE for example, they can respond with confidence and knowledge, to help steer them toward a sensible conclusion.  Building control officers won’t be swayed by a salesperson; they will be speaking to a technical expert who can show them they understand the application. They can demonstrate they have the appropriate technical knowledge and test data to support the argument which in turn can help building control move towards a viable decision. Furthermore, manufacturers have a responsibility to demonstrate how to use their products by offering installer’s toolbox talks and providing product literature that demonstrates how products should be correctly used. It’s not uncommon to learn that someone has installed something incorrectly because they didn’t know how to install it in the first place. With building regulations lagging behind the development of new materials and their impact on design, it has become increasingly important for manufacturers of construction products to provide advice and assistance at every stage of a project’s process, from conception through to construction and after. Visit: www.siderise.com
    Aug 30, 2018 309
  • 29 Aug 2018
    ‘Significant’ concerns that Britain’s labour force was under-skilled compared with other nations was a major driving force for learning and development programmes in the 19th century – how times haven’t changed, writes Jayne Fergusson, Operations Director at NCTS,. A definitive solution to the current skills shortage within the UK construction industry has yet to be found, increasing the need for training courses which offer candidates of all ability to gain a recognised qualification. A vocational NVQ Level 2 certificate and a Construction Skilled Certification Scheme (CSCS) Blue Skilled Worker card are vital accessories for those looking for a long and fulfilling career in the building trade. A CSCS card is increasingly required to gain access to construction sites as proof that individuals possess, or are in the process of, working towards a recognised qualification in the work they carry out. Signing-up to a Basic Competency Programme (BCP) or OSAT can be the first step towards achieving this. Qualification routes Basic Competency Program (BCP) Aimed at those who have neither a full competency or an official Lead, Stainless-Steel and Aluminium roofing qualification, BCP provides candidates with an opportunity to become qualified and convert their Green ‘labourer’ CSCS card to a Blue ‘skilled worker’ CSCS card, via a Red Experienced Worker card. The Lead Contractors Association (LCA), in conjunction with the Federation of Traditional Metal Roofing Contractors (FTMRC), are providing BCP training for Lead, Stainless-Steel and Aluminium roofing. Those who complete the programme will not only have covered sections of the Level 2 qualification, they will be in receipt of a certificate of competency in the knowledge and understanding of product systems, health, safety and welfare at a recognised level in the industry. The relevant roofing industry trade body will profile roofing operatives and advise the best route for further training or assessment to ultimately achieve an NVQ Level 2 and means to a Blue Skilled Worker CSCS card. Kick-start Certificated BCP operatives are able to apply for a three-year Red Experienced Worker CSCS card which will put them on the path to becoming competent and qualified.  The Red Experienced CSCS cannot be renewed and the qualification must be achieved within a three-year period. The BCP courses are being run in various locations in the UK to save time and travel with many available dates so that employers can be flexible with staff attendance. Ultimately, the BCP, which is endorsed by CITB, NFRC, Competent Roofer, Roofing Industry Alliance and CSCS, offers operatives a kick-start towards official recognition for the everyday work they carry out, instilling confidence in themselves and others that they possess the knowledge and skills to complete projects safely and to the highest quality. On-Site Assessment Training Alternatively, a Level 2 NVQ and Skilled Worker CSCS card can be obtained via On-site Assessment Programme (OSAT) - for roofing contractors with many years’ experience, but not in possession of a recognised industry qualification. The programme involves assessments of candidates’ on-site performance; their skills and abidance to practices such as health, height, safety and environment. Trainees and employers will be provided with a detailed report on their performance whilst outlining areas of improvement where necessary.  As the innovative programme is part-funded by the CITB, members are eligible for a grant towards OSAT fees. Following successful completion of a health, height, safety and environment test, they can register for a Level 2 NVQ which can be completed within three-to-nine months.  On completion a Blue Skilled Work CSCS card can be applied for. If, according to the well-known phrase, ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, BCPs and OSATs are the innovative response to the country’s desperate need for a qualified and talented workforce to help solve the current property crisis. Visit: www.ncts.org.uk
    363 Posted by Talk. Build
  • ‘Significant’ concerns that Britain’s labour force was under-skilled compared with other nations was a major driving force for learning and development programmes in the 19th century – how times haven’t changed, writes Jayne Fergusson, Operations Director at NCTS,. A definitive solution to the current skills shortage within the UK construction industry has yet to be found, increasing the need for training courses which offer candidates of all ability to gain a recognised qualification. A vocational NVQ Level 2 certificate and a Construction Skilled Certification Scheme (CSCS) Blue Skilled Worker card are vital accessories for those looking for a long and fulfilling career in the building trade. A CSCS card is increasingly required to gain access to construction sites as proof that individuals possess, or are in the process of, working towards a recognised qualification in the work they carry out. Signing-up to a Basic Competency Programme (BCP) or OSAT can be the first step towards achieving this. Qualification routes Basic Competency Program (BCP) Aimed at those who have neither a full competency or an official Lead, Stainless-Steel and Aluminium roofing qualification, BCP provides candidates with an opportunity to become qualified and convert their Green ‘labourer’ CSCS card to a Blue ‘skilled worker’ CSCS card, via a Red Experienced Worker card. The Lead Contractors Association (LCA), in conjunction with the Federation of Traditional Metal Roofing Contractors (FTMRC), are providing BCP training for Lead, Stainless-Steel and Aluminium roofing. Those who complete the programme will not only have covered sections of the Level 2 qualification, they will be in receipt of a certificate of competency in the knowledge and understanding of product systems, health, safety and welfare at a recognised level in the industry. The relevant roofing industry trade body will profile roofing operatives and advise the best route for further training or assessment to ultimately achieve an NVQ Level 2 and means to a Blue Skilled Worker CSCS card. Kick-start Certificated BCP operatives are able to apply for a three-year Red Experienced Worker CSCS card which will put them on the path to becoming competent and qualified.  The Red Experienced CSCS cannot be renewed and the qualification must be achieved within a three-year period. The BCP courses are being run in various locations in the UK to save time and travel with many available dates so that employers can be flexible with staff attendance. Ultimately, the BCP, which is endorsed by CITB, NFRC, Competent Roofer, Roofing Industry Alliance and CSCS, offers operatives a kick-start towards official recognition for the everyday work they carry out, instilling confidence in themselves and others that they possess the knowledge and skills to complete projects safely and to the highest quality. On-Site Assessment Training Alternatively, a Level 2 NVQ and Skilled Worker CSCS card can be obtained via On-site Assessment Programme (OSAT) - for roofing contractors with many years’ experience, but not in possession of a recognised industry qualification. The programme involves assessments of candidates’ on-site performance; their skills and abidance to practices such as health, height, safety and environment. Trainees and employers will be provided with a detailed report on their performance whilst outlining areas of improvement where necessary.  As the innovative programme is part-funded by the CITB, members are eligible for a grant towards OSAT fees. Following successful completion of a health, height, safety and environment test, they can register for a Level 2 NVQ which can be completed within three-to-nine months.  On completion a Blue Skilled Work CSCS card can be applied for. If, according to the well-known phrase, ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, BCPs and OSATs are the innovative response to the country’s desperate need for a qualified and talented workforce to help solve the current property crisis. Visit: www.ncts.org.uk
    Aug 29, 2018 363
  • 22 Aug 2018
    Events over the past 12 months have meant that the construction industry has had to take a good hard look at itself in the mirror writes Dr Gavin Dunn, Chief Executive Officer at CABE. Unfortunately not everyone likes what they see. Public perception is at an all-time low and this scrutiny doesn’t look like it will ease up any time soon. So what do we need to do to get confidence back and to start to deliver the buildings that we promise? I believe it hinges on competency. Last year’s Grenfell tower tragedy highlighted some of the shortcomings of the construction industry. This was further reinforced in the publication of Dame Judith Hackitt’s independent review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety last month. Together they have shown that the industry is unable police itself and we have created a profound loss of confidence in how we deliver buildings that are fit for purpose. Entitled ‘Building a Safer Future’ the review from the very front cover says what we need to do – building things safer – and better – in the future. And this is the very crux of where I believe the issue lies. It is about how we do things better and do to this we need to have competent professionals at every stage of the process. I believe our process of creating professionals needs to be looked at. As it currently stands you complete your studies and graduate as a professional. To maintain your position you then have to complete CPDs. Whilst on face value this seems a logical process, I don’t think it is adequate. The way we are designing and build buildings is changing – and fast. They are becoming more complex and technologies are changing the way in which they operate. The problem is that this change is far outpacing the way our industry professionals maintain their expertise and knowledge. We need to adopt a better process that allows us to identify those individuals who have providence and precision, and the necessary skills to do the job. This will have to be achieved through greater education and training and I believe it is the responsibility of the professional bodies to do this. CABE are already creating a framework to enable members to enhance their skills through the application of engineering principles that are in line with today’s every changing world. This can be supported by organisations such as UKAS, the UK's National Accreditation Body, taking charge of product and service certification. This way we have competent professionals and accredited products and together this will go a long way to put us back on track to deliver the buildings we should be delivering. We have to expect big changes right across the industry over the coming months and years and it will not be enough to sit back and wait to be told what we need to do. The industry needs pro-active, competent professionals that can take the lead and prove they have the right skills and understanding to do what is expected of them. By doing this we can start to rebuild public confidence and create a legacy of buildings that are fit for purpose. Visit: www.cbuilde.com.
    302 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Events over the past 12 months have meant that the construction industry has had to take a good hard look at itself in the mirror writes Dr Gavin Dunn, Chief Executive Officer at CABE. Unfortunately not everyone likes what they see. Public perception is at an all-time low and this scrutiny doesn’t look like it will ease up any time soon. So what do we need to do to get confidence back and to start to deliver the buildings that we promise? I believe it hinges on competency. Last year’s Grenfell tower tragedy highlighted some of the shortcomings of the construction industry. This was further reinforced in the publication of Dame Judith Hackitt’s independent review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety last month. Together they have shown that the industry is unable police itself and we have created a profound loss of confidence in how we deliver buildings that are fit for purpose. Entitled ‘Building a Safer Future’ the review from the very front cover says what we need to do – building things safer – and better – in the future. And this is the very crux of where I believe the issue lies. It is about how we do things better and do to this we need to have competent professionals at every stage of the process. I believe our process of creating professionals needs to be looked at. As it currently stands you complete your studies and graduate as a professional. To maintain your position you then have to complete CPDs. Whilst on face value this seems a logical process, I don’t think it is adequate. The way we are designing and build buildings is changing – and fast. They are becoming more complex and technologies are changing the way in which they operate. The problem is that this change is far outpacing the way our industry professionals maintain their expertise and knowledge. We need to adopt a better process that allows us to identify those individuals who have providence and precision, and the necessary skills to do the job. This will have to be achieved through greater education and training and I believe it is the responsibility of the professional bodies to do this. CABE are already creating a framework to enable members to enhance their skills through the application of engineering principles that are in line with today’s every changing world. This can be supported by organisations such as UKAS, the UK's National Accreditation Body, taking charge of product and service certification. This way we have competent professionals and accredited products and together this will go a long way to put us back on track to deliver the buildings we should be delivering. We have to expect big changes right across the industry over the coming months and years and it will not be enough to sit back and wait to be told what we need to do. The industry needs pro-active, competent professionals that can take the lead and prove they have the right skills and understanding to do what is expected of them. By doing this we can start to rebuild public confidence and create a legacy of buildings that are fit for purpose. Visit: www.cbuilde.com.
    Aug 22, 2018 302
  • 20 Aug 2018
    Our interior spaces have evolved to such an extent ceilings have become a vitally important element in the design and acoustics of commercial space writes Phil Smith, Group Sales Director, SAS International. Gone are the days of dull and functional mineral fibreceiling tiles, and into the mix enters everything from polynodal ceilings to colourful baffles, open-cells to rafts – all of which create aesthetically pleasing features as well as offering a wide range of acoustic, thermal, fire and lighting options. Versatile, sustainable and visually-enigmatic, metal ceilings offer countless design possibilities. Lighting Finding a lighting system which is sustainable as well as seamless is prerequisite for modern commercial buildings. Open office spaces in particular are wide and expansive, requiring a sophisticated lighting design that satisfies the demands of developers and architects. Lighting must be cost-effective, environmentally-friendly and distinctive in equal measure - a challenging balance to strike in large spaces. Integrated-lighting delivers on efficiency and visuals, illuminating a space with its discreet, stunning finish and encouraging optimum light flow. LED lighting is a favoured, sustainable design choice delivering 90% of its peak output after operating for 60,000 hours. Integrated-lighting works in complete harmony with a variety of ceiling plans, including suspended ceilings and baffles. Integrated-lighting exemplifies how seamless, sustainable lighting can be achieved, showcasing the impressive innovation metal ceiling designs are capable of. Acoustic Clever acoustic technology is a key consideration in modern building design, especially as sound reverberation occurs in constructions made predominantly from glass and concrete. Open, agile working environments which enhance employee wellness are gaining in popularity – the days of small office spaces are numbered. Sweeping interiors are prominent in modern commercial buildings; therefore there is a growing demand for ceiling designs to suit these interiors, whilst still controlling sound travel. Although metal seems an unlikely product for ceiling design, it is in fact extremely successful at sound absorption. Metal ceilings assure excellent acoustic regulation, minimising echo and other occupational noise. Perforated metal ceiling tiles can be designed creatively depending on the level of acoustic control desired. These can be inlaid with mineral wool infills to provide acute sound control far more advanced than other ceiling materials. In a time where open-plan designs cannot be jeopardised by noise levels, metal ceilings are a worthy solution. Thermal Maintaining a comfortable temperature in commercial buildings has its challenges, particularly from sustainability and wellbeing perspectives. These two factors are key considerations in modern building design; if a building is too hot it affects employee productivity, and if too much heat is emitted it is costly for both the environment and those renting the spaces.   Thermal mass cooling is a desirable method which controls an interior space’s temperature. It operates most effectively in buildings made from dense materials such as concrete, as these materials guarantee optimum heat absorption. Sunlight is absorbed during the day to heat the building at night, in order to provide cool temperatures when people are at work. Baffles and rafts are examples of metal ceiling solutions which expose the concrete soffit to encourage heat absorption. Both solutions meet practical, aesthetic requirements, showcasing how metal ceilings can draw on unique, natural air conditioning systems to create beautiful, sustainable interior designs.  Fire Fire protection is a design imperative in modern interior spaces, whereby architects and developers must ensure their projects comply with current building regulations. Metal ceilings are naturally resistant to fire due to metal’s atomic structure. Although it is not recommended for suspended ceilings to protect a building’s larger structure, metal ceilings nonetheless provide a unique solution to fire-resistance. Whilst all metal ceilings must be certified in accordance with UK and European standards, the design still assures safety and protection from the plight of fire. Aesthetic Metal is a highly malleable element, meaning the aesthetic possibilities of metal ceilings are limitless. Offering cool, sleek designs which can be shaped to reflect, complement, or heighten a building’s identity, metal ceilings are a favourable choice for developers wanting to put their unique stamp on a project. Whether it is colourful baffles or a distinctive motif, bespoke metal ceilings guarantee complete design flexibility – even the most ambitious of designs can be made a reality. The days of conventional mineral fibreceiling tiles are quickly vanishing, as the rise of metal ceilings grows from strength to strength. It is no wonder metal ceilings are dominating the design world; their ability to combine design versatility, sustainability and striking aesthetics is a secure investment for any developer desiring a high-impact and beautiful interior space.  Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/metal-ceilings  
    256 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Our interior spaces have evolved to such an extent ceilings have become a vitally important element in the design and acoustics of commercial space writes Phil Smith, Group Sales Director, SAS International. Gone are the days of dull and functional mineral fibreceiling tiles, and into the mix enters everything from polynodal ceilings to colourful baffles, open-cells to rafts – all of which create aesthetically pleasing features as well as offering a wide range of acoustic, thermal, fire and lighting options. Versatile, sustainable and visually-enigmatic, metal ceilings offer countless design possibilities. Lighting Finding a lighting system which is sustainable as well as seamless is prerequisite for modern commercial buildings. Open office spaces in particular are wide and expansive, requiring a sophisticated lighting design that satisfies the demands of developers and architects. Lighting must be cost-effective, environmentally-friendly and distinctive in equal measure - a challenging balance to strike in large spaces. Integrated-lighting delivers on efficiency and visuals, illuminating a space with its discreet, stunning finish and encouraging optimum light flow. LED lighting is a favoured, sustainable design choice delivering 90% of its peak output after operating for 60,000 hours. Integrated-lighting works in complete harmony with a variety of ceiling plans, including suspended ceilings and baffles. Integrated-lighting exemplifies how seamless, sustainable lighting can be achieved, showcasing the impressive innovation metal ceiling designs are capable of. Acoustic Clever acoustic technology is a key consideration in modern building design, especially as sound reverberation occurs in constructions made predominantly from glass and concrete. Open, agile working environments which enhance employee wellness are gaining in popularity – the days of small office spaces are numbered. Sweeping interiors are prominent in modern commercial buildings; therefore there is a growing demand for ceiling designs to suit these interiors, whilst still controlling sound travel. Although metal seems an unlikely product for ceiling design, it is in fact extremely successful at sound absorption. Metal ceilings assure excellent acoustic regulation, minimising echo and other occupational noise. Perforated metal ceiling tiles can be designed creatively depending on the level of acoustic control desired. These can be inlaid with mineral wool infills to provide acute sound control far more advanced than other ceiling materials. In a time where open-plan designs cannot be jeopardised by noise levels, metal ceilings are a worthy solution. Thermal Maintaining a comfortable temperature in commercial buildings has its challenges, particularly from sustainability and wellbeing perspectives. These two factors are key considerations in modern building design; if a building is too hot it affects employee productivity, and if too much heat is emitted it is costly for both the environment and those renting the spaces.   Thermal mass cooling is a desirable method which controls an interior space’s temperature. It operates most effectively in buildings made from dense materials such as concrete, as these materials guarantee optimum heat absorption. Sunlight is absorbed during the day to heat the building at night, in order to provide cool temperatures when people are at work. Baffles and rafts are examples of metal ceiling solutions which expose the concrete soffit to encourage heat absorption. Both solutions meet practical, aesthetic requirements, showcasing how metal ceilings can draw on unique, natural air conditioning systems to create beautiful, sustainable interior designs.  Fire Fire protection is a design imperative in modern interior spaces, whereby architects and developers must ensure their projects comply with current building regulations. Metal ceilings are naturally resistant to fire due to metal’s atomic structure. Although it is not recommended for suspended ceilings to protect a building’s larger structure, metal ceilings nonetheless provide a unique solution to fire-resistance. Whilst all metal ceilings must be certified in accordance with UK and European standards, the design still assures safety and protection from the plight of fire. Aesthetic Metal is a highly malleable element, meaning the aesthetic possibilities of metal ceilings are limitless. Offering cool, sleek designs which can be shaped to reflect, complement, or heighten a building’s identity, metal ceilings are a favourable choice for developers wanting to put their unique stamp on a project. Whether it is colourful baffles or a distinctive motif, bespoke metal ceilings guarantee complete design flexibility – even the most ambitious of designs can be made a reality. The days of conventional mineral fibreceiling tiles are quickly vanishing, as the rise of metal ceilings grows from strength to strength. It is no wonder metal ceilings are dominating the design world; their ability to combine design versatility, sustainability and striking aesthetics is a secure investment for any developer desiring a high-impact and beautiful interior space.  Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/metal-ceilings  
    Aug 20, 2018 256
  • 16 Aug 2018
    Construction output is on the rise globally, but limited resources and awareness of the need to be environmentally responsible mean that you must be conscious of the environmental impact of all building projects writes Tom Moverman. There are four ways that technology is helping “green” the construction industry. Energy-Efficient Building Features There is clear customer demand for builders to be knowledgeable about and experienced in working with the modern technologies that allow for sustainable and environmentally friendly materials to be used in both commercial and residential projects. The benefits are clear when considering the financial efficiency of these options, along with government tax incentives for homeowners and businesses that have incorporated green technology systems like • Photovoltaic cells • Solar heaters • Geothermal power • Wind systems • Updates to building envelope features on existing properties including doors, windows and skylights, roofs, and insulation These technologies may come with a greater investment up front compared to traditional options, but overall the cost savings for the future make them worthwhile. Building Information Modeling (BIM) BIM is not just a type of software, but the entire process of using this technology in the architecture, engineering, and construction fields to build 3D digital models. From concept planning to beginning the building design, BIM takes users through all of the necessary steps in construction and management of the project, while remaining conscious of the building's environmental impact. Building Information Modeling facilitates savings and improves efficiency in construction, based on the expectation that this system results in fewer mistakes and prevents potentially costly changes during the building process. BIM is a huge advancement on past practices of CAD design using 2-D drawings or 3-D models separated into multiple sections. With BIM, if a change is made in one area, it automatically updates throughout the entire project. Envisioning the completed design as a whole is effortless, and any potential issues are easy to spot early in the design process. Learn more about the benefits of using BIM technology here. According to a recent Market Research Engine report, the BIM market is anticipated to experience continued significant growth worldwide. In 2014, the global BIM market was valued at US$2.3 Billion, and is expected to reach a value of US$ 13.2 Billion by the end of 2024. Prefabricated Construction BIM has also helped increase the opportunities for industrialized construction sites that allow you to create prefabricated and modular buildings in controlled offsite environments. There are a number of benefits to building this way, including • Increased worker safety • Reduced costs on materials • Less waste • Greater energy-efficiency in the buildings produced • Tighter delivery timelines Virtual Reality VR is much more than just a tool for gamers. This technology allows for a construction planning process that includes realistic walk-throughs of planned projects. Developers can interact with their design, notice any potential problems, and see where improvements can be made, all before anything is actually built. This method is amazingly vivid compared to the past practice of working with static 3-D mock-up models. Virtual reality is also especially helpful for education, as now students who may have never been on an actual construction site can get a real feel for that environment, all from the safety of the classroom. Customers can also benefit from VR by being able to take part in making decisions about the functionality and flow of the building during the planning process. Technology is driving the construction industry now more than ever, and it is sure to continue to do so as future strategies and tools arise that will help designers, engineers and builders create even greater sustainability in construction. Author Bio: Tom Moverman established the Lipsig Law Firm with Harry Lipsig and his partners in 1989. The personal injury law firm focuses on products liability, personal injury, construction accidents, car accidents and medical malpractice. For more information, visit LipsigLawyers.com
    375 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Construction output is on the rise globally, but limited resources and awareness of the need to be environmentally responsible mean that you must be conscious of the environmental impact of all building projects writes Tom Moverman. There are four ways that technology is helping “green” the construction industry. Energy-Efficient Building Features There is clear customer demand for builders to be knowledgeable about and experienced in working with the modern technologies that allow for sustainable and environmentally friendly materials to be used in both commercial and residential projects. The benefits are clear when considering the financial efficiency of these options, along with government tax incentives for homeowners and businesses that have incorporated green technology systems like • Photovoltaic cells • Solar heaters • Geothermal power • Wind systems • Updates to building envelope features on existing properties including doors, windows and skylights, roofs, and insulation These technologies may come with a greater investment up front compared to traditional options, but overall the cost savings for the future make them worthwhile. Building Information Modeling (BIM) BIM is not just a type of software, but the entire process of using this technology in the architecture, engineering, and construction fields to build 3D digital models. From concept planning to beginning the building design, BIM takes users through all of the necessary steps in construction and management of the project, while remaining conscious of the building's environmental impact. Building Information Modeling facilitates savings and improves efficiency in construction, based on the expectation that this system results in fewer mistakes and prevents potentially costly changes during the building process. BIM is a huge advancement on past practices of CAD design using 2-D drawings or 3-D models separated into multiple sections. With BIM, if a change is made in one area, it automatically updates throughout the entire project. Envisioning the completed design as a whole is effortless, and any potential issues are easy to spot early in the design process. Learn more about the benefits of using BIM technology here. According to a recent Market Research Engine report, the BIM market is anticipated to experience continued significant growth worldwide. In 2014, the global BIM market was valued at US$2.3 Billion, and is expected to reach a value of US$ 13.2 Billion by the end of 2024. Prefabricated Construction BIM has also helped increase the opportunities for industrialized construction sites that allow you to create prefabricated and modular buildings in controlled offsite environments. There are a number of benefits to building this way, including • Increased worker safety • Reduced costs on materials • Less waste • Greater energy-efficiency in the buildings produced • Tighter delivery timelines Virtual Reality VR is much more than just a tool for gamers. This technology allows for a construction planning process that includes realistic walk-throughs of planned projects. Developers can interact with their design, notice any potential problems, and see where improvements can be made, all before anything is actually built. This method is amazingly vivid compared to the past practice of working with static 3-D mock-up models. Virtual reality is also especially helpful for education, as now students who may have never been on an actual construction site can get a real feel for that environment, all from the safety of the classroom. Customers can also benefit from VR by being able to take part in making decisions about the functionality and flow of the building during the planning process. Technology is driving the construction industry now more than ever, and it is sure to continue to do so as future strategies and tools arise that will help designers, engineers and builders create even greater sustainability in construction. Author Bio: Tom Moverman established the Lipsig Law Firm with Harry Lipsig and his partners in 1989. The personal injury law firm focuses on products liability, personal injury, construction accidents, car accidents and medical malpractice. For more information, visit LipsigLawyers.com
    Aug 16, 2018 375
  • 15 Aug 2018
    Slipform construction is a construction method in which concrete is poured into a continuously moving form. It is a method for vertically extruding a reinforced concrete section and is suitable for the construction of core walls in high-rise structures: lift shafts, stair shafts, towers, etc. Requiring little crane-time during construction, Slipform is a self-contained formwork system that can also apply to horizontal structures such as central reservations in road construction. Building a platform It is similar in nature and application to jumpform where the formwork is moved intermittently and used to form any regular shape or core. The formwork rises continuously, at a rate of about 300mm per hour, supporting itself on the core and not relying on support or access from other parts of the building or permanent works. Commonly, the formwork has three platforms. The upper platform acts as a storage and distribution area while the middle platform, which is the main working platform, is at the top of the poured concrete level. The lower platform provides access for concrete finishing. Slipforming is a quick and efficient construction technique. Because the height of the formwork is usually only around 1.20 metres and the hourly production rate is  normally between 15 to 30 cm, the concrete underneath is between four and eight- hours-old and must be stiff enough to bear its own weight  However, it must not have set enough for some of it to stick to the rising formwork (‘plucking’).The main requirement for slipforming without problems is concreting all areas at the same level at the same time, and then allowing the concrete to set consistently to allow the lifting of the formwork. Therefore, not only is consistent concrete required in terms of consistence and performance but also the temperature of both the concrete and the environmentare vitally important in understanding how the concrete will behave. Concrete for slipforming Modern concrete mixes for slipform construction vary considerably with a typical range of strengths between C40/50 and C76/95; a range of consistence values between S4 and self- compacting concrete and a range of controlled setting times to suit the particular construction project. The use of micro silica is becoming more prevalent with self compacting mixes. Both consistency and flexibility are required for the successful supply of concrete to slipform structures. Sika has both the knowledge and expertise to optimise the use of Viscoflow superplasticisers, with Sika retarders and stabilisers to optimise performance of the mixes and to ensure smooth operations on site. Points to consider Careful planning of construction processes can achieve high production rates. Since the formwork operates independently, formation of the core in advance of the rest of the structure takes it off the critical path – enhancing main structure stability. Availability of the different working platforms in the formwork system allows the exposed concrete at the bottom of the rising formwork to be finished, making it an integral part of the construction process. Certain formwork systems permit construction of tapered cores and towers. Slipform systems require a small but highly-skilled workforce on site. Correctly installed, slipform concrete can help our buildings stand tall for our long-term benefit. Visit: https://sikaconcrete.co.uk
    344 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Slipform construction is a construction method in which concrete is poured into a continuously moving form. It is a method for vertically extruding a reinforced concrete section and is suitable for the construction of core walls in high-rise structures: lift shafts, stair shafts, towers, etc. Requiring little crane-time during construction, Slipform is a self-contained formwork system that can also apply to horizontal structures such as central reservations in road construction. Building a platform It is similar in nature and application to jumpform where the formwork is moved intermittently and used to form any regular shape or core. The formwork rises continuously, at a rate of about 300mm per hour, supporting itself on the core and not relying on support or access from other parts of the building or permanent works. Commonly, the formwork has three platforms. The upper platform acts as a storage and distribution area while the middle platform, which is the main working platform, is at the top of the poured concrete level. The lower platform provides access for concrete finishing. Slipforming is a quick and efficient construction technique. Because the height of the formwork is usually only around 1.20 metres and the hourly production rate is  normally between 15 to 30 cm, the concrete underneath is between four and eight- hours-old and must be stiff enough to bear its own weight  However, it must not have set enough for some of it to stick to the rising formwork (‘plucking’).The main requirement for slipforming without problems is concreting all areas at the same level at the same time, and then allowing the concrete to set consistently to allow the lifting of the formwork. Therefore, not only is consistent concrete required in terms of consistence and performance but also the temperature of both the concrete and the environmentare vitally important in understanding how the concrete will behave. Concrete for slipforming Modern concrete mixes for slipform construction vary considerably with a typical range of strengths between C40/50 and C76/95; a range of consistence values between S4 and self- compacting concrete and a range of controlled setting times to suit the particular construction project. The use of micro silica is becoming more prevalent with self compacting mixes. Both consistency and flexibility are required for the successful supply of concrete to slipform structures. Sika has both the knowledge and expertise to optimise the use of Viscoflow superplasticisers, with Sika retarders and stabilisers to optimise performance of the mixes and to ensure smooth operations on site. Points to consider Careful planning of construction processes can achieve high production rates. Since the formwork operates independently, formation of the core in advance of the rest of the structure takes it off the critical path – enhancing main structure stability. Availability of the different working platforms in the formwork system allows the exposed concrete at the bottom of the rising formwork to be finished, making it an integral part of the construction process. Certain formwork systems permit construction of tapered cores and towers. Slipform systems require a small but highly-skilled workforce on site. Correctly installed, slipform concrete can help our buildings stand tall for our long-term benefit. Visit: https://sikaconcrete.co.uk
    Aug 15, 2018 344
  • 13 Aug 2018
    Each and every day, we experience a symphony of sounds to make our lives richer writes Stuart Colam, Acoustic Engineer, SAS International. From the dawn chorus to the soothing sounds of a gentle stream, and the less desirable noises such as machinery and a baby crying; the auditory stimulus around us is vast and elicits a specific response in our minds. But what specifically issound? How is it made? How does it travel? And why can we hear it? If air was visible then it might make it easier to explain, but sound is essentially bits of air vibrating. These air molecules vibrate and bump into each other, which in turn results in a local increase in air pressure. This chain reaction happens quickly, with the speed of sound in air being about 770mph. One way to illustrate this is by a slinky spring sending pulses backwards and forwards along its length. If nothing makes your eardrum move you will not hear anything. If there is no variation in the air pressure there is no sound.  Air pressure varies with height, decreasing with increasing altitude. In other words, there are fewer air molecules at 8000 metres than at sea level, for instance. This is why at the summit of Mount Everest the air is thinner.   Chain reaction Something needs to happen to make the air molecules move, i.e. for sound to be produced. When this occurs, one molecule will bump into another and this chain reaction results in the molecules being closer together than they would have been. An increase in pressure commences, as the molecules are essentially being squashed together and passing on vibrational energy; molecule to molecule.  The movement of air propagates and that’s what we call sound. As they bump into each other there is an increase and decrease in air pressure. This push and pull of sound waves reaches your ear and vibrates your eardrum. This ultimately results in electrical signals being sent to your brain and interpreted as sound.  Sound travels at different speeds depending on the medium. In steel, sound travels 17 times faster than in air, while in water it travels about four times faster. Think about when you are swimming in the sea and how hard it is to gauge where the noise of a boat engine is coming from. Sound travels more efficiently and faster through water than air. All sound needs is something to vibrate and bump into, which is why in space the absence of molecules makes it impossible to transmit any kind of sound. Sound in the built environment is sometimes overlooked and should be an important consideration.  When designing modern interiors there is much more than meets the eye – we must consider the ear as well.  It’s an issue that has become particularly important due to the proliferation of open and agile working environments. Sweeping interiors are prominent in today’s commercial buildings; therefore there is a growing demand for ceiling designs to suit these interiors, whilst still controlling sound travel.  It’s why metal ceilings have become the go-to solution that ensures these open-plan designs are not jeopardised by noise levels. A client might well place greater emphasis on aesthetics, but a good design must deliver effective sound management and an acoustic landscape which positively impacts on the productivity and wellbeing of building occupants. Visit:  https://sasintgroup.com
    297 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Each and every day, we experience a symphony of sounds to make our lives richer writes Stuart Colam, Acoustic Engineer, SAS International. From the dawn chorus to the soothing sounds of a gentle stream, and the less desirable noises such as machinery and a baby crying; the auditory stimulus around us is vast and elicits a specific response in our minds. But what specifically issound? How is it made? How does it travel? And why can we hear it? If air was visible then it might make it easier to explain, but sound is essentially bits of air vibrating. These air molecules vibrate and bump into each other, which in turn results in a local increase in air pressure. This chain reaction happens quickly, with the speed of sound in air being about 770mph. One way to illustrate this is by a slinky spring sending pulses backwards and forwards along its length. If nothing makes your eardrum move you will not hear anything. If there is no variation in the air pressure there is no sound.  Air pressure varies with height, decreasing with increasing altitude. In other words, there are fewer air molecules at 8000 metres than at sea level, for instance. This is why at the summit of Mount Everest the air is thinner.   Chain reaction Something needs to happen to make the air molecules move, i.e. for sound to be produced. When this occurs, one molecule will bump into another and this chain reaction results in the molecules being closer together than they would have been. An increase in pressure commences, as the molecules are essentially being squashed together and passing on vibrational energy; molecule to molecule.  The movement of air propagates and that’s what we call sound. As they bump into each other there is an increase and decrease in air pressure. This push and pull of sound waves reaches your ear and vibrates your eardrum. This ultimately results in electrical signals being sent to your brain and interpreted as sound.  Sound travels at different speeds depending on the medium. In steel, sound travels 17 times faster than in air, while in water it travels about four times faster. Think about when you are swimming in the sea and how hard it is to gauge where the noise of a boat engine is coming from. Sound travels more efficiently and faster through water than air. All sound needs is something to vibrate and bump into, which is why in space the absence of molecules makes it impossible to transmit any kind of sound. Sound in the built environment is sometimes overlooked and should be an important consideration.  When designing modern interiors there is much more than meets the eye – we must consider the ear as well.  It’s an issue that has become particularly important due to the proliferation of open and agile working environments. Sweeping interiors are prominent in today’s commercial buildings; therefore there is a growing demand for ceiling designs to suit these interiors, whilst still controlling sound travel.  It’s why metal ceilings have become the go-to solution that ensures these open-plan designs are not jeopardised by noise levels. A client might well place greater emphasis on aesthetics, but a good design must deliver effective sound management and an acoustic landscape which positively impacts on the productivity and wellbeing of building occupants. Visit:  https://sasintgroup.com
    Aug 13, 2018 297
  • 10 Aug 2018
    The average UK household spends around £1,230 on fuel bills each year which can be up to 50% more than necessary due to the lack of energy saving measures being implemented in the home. Poor insulation is a major contributor to domestic energy wastage. To help combat this, the construction industry is increasingly turning to rigid foam PIR panels, rather than mineral fibre-based insulation solutions. Kevin Bohea, Commercial Director at leading UK PIR manufacturers, lists five ways in which insulation boards offer an advantage over the mineral-based equivalent. PIR insulation board has a closed cell structure that means it doesn’t absorb water. This allows the thermal performance and reliability of the panel to be retained over time. The panels are light and easy to transport as well as being simple to install, helping save on-site labour costs. Unlike fibrous insulation which deteriorates over time when damp sets in, PIR insulation’s structural strength enables a consistent performance that will last the lifetime of a building, negating costly repairs and maintaining its thermal and soundproof qualities. PIR insulation is also renowned for its flexible qualities, providing the ideal solution for a range of applications such as floors, walls, pitched and flat roofing. Innovative PIR solutions such as Eurowall+, manufactured by Recticel, features a unique tongue-and-groove joint on the board’s four sides to ensure a tight, secure lock. It means Eurowall+ board increases protection against wind-driven rain which can cause poorly-fitted mineral fibre products to deteriorate over time. Although mineral-based insulation is fairly flexible – it can be manipulated around wall ties, etc – its propensity to degrade over time, particularly if damp sets-in, means rigid PIR board is increasingly seen as a preferable cavity insulation option. It has a long-term cost benefit, too. For mineral wool to attain the same level of thermal performance as Eurowall+ board, it’s estimated 150mm-thick insulation would need to be installed, resulting in an accordant increase in the cavity wall size. Once the cavity width increases, wall-tie lengths have to be lengthened and window and door lintels expanded - the whole building process becomes more costly.  With developers looking to fit as many homes onto allocated plots as possible, maintaining a 100mm cavity in new buildings has become a necessity. Eurowall+ 90mm PIR board not only helps to achieve a 0.18 U-value in a 100mm cavity, the 10mm air gap makes for a less inconvenient fit for bricklayers when it comes to installing the insulation. Therefore, Eurowall+ maximises space whilst minimising cost for housebuilders, making it not only an ideal alternative to mineral-based insulation; it’s the superior PIR solution.  Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    359 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The average UK household spends around £1,230 on fuel bills each year which can be up to 50% more than necessary due to the lack of energy saving measures being implemented in the home. Poor insulation is a major contributor to domestic energy wastage. To help combat this, the construction industry is increasingly turning to rigid foam PIR panels, rather than mineral fibre-based insulation solutions. Kevin Bohea, Commercial Director at leading UK PIR manufacturers, lists five ways in which insulation boards offer an advantage over the mineral-based equivalent. PIR insulation board has a closed cell structure that means it doesn’t absorb water. This allows the thermal performance and reliability of the panel to be retained over time. The panels are light and easy to transport as well as being simple to install, helping save on-site labour costs. Unlike fibrous insulation which deteriorates over time when damp sets in, PIR insulation’s structural strength enables a consistent performance that will last the lifetime of a building, negating costly repairs and maintaining its thermal and soundproof qualities. PIR insulation is also renowned for its flexible qualities, providing the ideal solution for a range of applications such as floors, walls, pitched and flat roofing. Innovative PIR solutions such as Eurowall+, manufactured by Recticel, features a unique tongue-and-groove joint on the board’s four sides to ensure a tight, secure lock. It means Eurowall+ board increases protection against wind-driven rain which can cause poorly-fitted mineral fibre products to deteriorate over time. Although mineral-based insulation is fairly flexible – it can be manipulated around wall ties, etc – its propensity to degrade over time, particularly if damp sets-in, means rigid PIR board is increasingly seen as a preferable cavity insulation option. It has a long-term cost benefit, too. For mineral wool to attain the same level of thermal performance as Eurowall+ board, it’s estimated 150mm-thick insulation would need to be installed, resulting in an accordant increase in the cavity wall size. Once the cavity width increases, wall-tie lengths have to be lengthened and window and door lintels expanded - the whole building process becomes more costly.  With developers looking to fit as many homes onto allocated plots as possible, maintaining a 100mm cavity in new buildings has become a necessity. Eurowall+ 90mm PIR board not only helps to achieve a 0.18 U-value in a 100mm cavity, the 10mm air gap makes for a less inconvenient fit for bricklayers when it comes to installing the insulation. Therefore, Eurowall+ maximises space whilst minimising cost for housebuilders, making it not only an ideal alternative to mineral-based insulation; it’s the superior PIR solution.  Visit: www.recticelinsulation.co.uk
    Aug 10, 2018 359
  • 07 Aug 2018
    In the past few years significant progress has been made to make the construction industry accessible to women; whether that be lowering the gender pay-gap or increasing the amount of jobs on offer. Whilst the changes are positive and reassuring, there are still some gender imbalances which need addressing. Baumit, a global building materials manufacturer, is making a commendable effort to make the sector more inclusive for women, standing as a fine example of how the construction industry is levelling-out gender biases in the sector. Whilst the construction industry appears to be heading in the right direction, with women currently accounting for 18.8% of the sector’s workforce compared to 12.1% a decade ago, the figures still show how building and associated trades predominantly remain a man’s world. This is an issue that urgently needs to be addressed, and companies should be focusing on how they can change this. The industry is missing a trick by not tapping into the largely ignored talent pool at its disposal, and further attention needs to be paid to how women can access jobs within the construction industry. Whether by learning the skills to be a plasterer or becoming head of marketing for a building company, there are plenty of opportunities for women. They just need to be highlighted and made available.  A survey commissioned by house builder Keepmoat, for example, revealed that only 13% of women aged 16 to 25 would consider a career in construction. To find out why this figure is so low, certain questions need to be raised. For example, are women not encouraged to enter the industry, or are they simply not being given the right opportunities to make construction their career? Baumit’s current employment ratio of men to women is almost at 50%, showcasing how the company is leading a new generation of building manufacturers that are bringing women into the job sector. At Baumit, employees are hired on merit and credibility and the company is a known advocate for equal pay in the construction industry. Research carried out in 2016 by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors found that on average men earned £11,000 more than women in a similar role. This was up from a pay gap of £7,000 in the same survey a year earlier. At Baumit, both men and women in the same roles are paid similar rates, and both female and male employees are given equal opportunities. This equal environment allows women to cultivate their skillset while working for one of the leading innovators in the built environment. It is important that the construction industry continues to make positive attempts to promote inclusivity in the sector. Organisations such as Women in Roofing seek to inspire and support young women hoping to make their way into the trade. Hopefully, organisations such as this will help dismantle perceptions about the sector being inherently male. The annual Women in Construction conference is another important step, providing a space for discussion on equal rights and female representation throughout the industry. Change is happening because of these timely and honest conversations, but in the meantime, Baumit remains a testament to equal opportunities and gender equality in the construction workplace. Visit:  https://www.baumit.co.uk  
    466 Posted by Talk. Build
  • In the past few years significant progress has been made to make the construction industry accessible to women; whether that be lowering the gender pay-gap or increasing the amount of jobs on offer. Whilst the changes are positive and reassuring, there are still some gender imbalances which need addressing. Baumit, a global building materials manufacturer, is making a commendable effort to make the sector more inclusive for women, standing as a fine example of how the construction industry is levelling-out gender biases in the sector. Whilst the construction industry appears to be heading in the right direction, with women currently accounting for 18.8% of the sector’s workforce compared to 12.1% a decade ago, the figures still show how building and associated trades predominantly remain a man’s world. This is an issue that urgently needs to be addressed, and companies should be focusing on how they can change this. The industry is missing a trick by not tapping into the largely ignored talent pool at its disposal, and further attention needs to be paid to how women can access jobs within the construction industry. Whether by learning the skills to be a plasterer or becoming head of marketing for a building company, there are plenty of opportunities for women. They just need to be highlighted and made available.  A survey commissioned by house builder Keepmoat, for example, revealed that only 13% of women aged 16 to 25 would consider a career in construction. To find out why this figure is so low, certain questions need to be raised. For example, are women not encouraged to enter the industry, or are they simply not being given the right opportunities to make construction their career? Baumit’s current employment ratio of men to women is almost at 50%, showcasing how the company is leading a new generation of building manufacturers that are bringing women into the job sector. At Baumit, employees are hired on merit and credibility and the company is a known advocate for equal pay in the construction industry. Research carried out in 2016 by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors found that on average men earned £11,000 more than women in a similar role. This was up from a pay gap of £7,000 in the same survey a year earlier. At Baumit, both men and women in the same roles are paid similar rates, and both female and male employees are given equal opportunities. This equal environment allows women to cultivate their skillset while working for one of the leading innovators in the built environment. It is important that the construction industry continues to make positive attempts to promote inclusivity in the sector. Organisations such as Women in Roofing seek to inspire and support young women hoping to make their way into the trade. Hopefully, organisations such as this will help dismantle perceptions about the sector being inherently male. The annual Women in Construction conference is another important step, providing a space for discussion on equal rights and female representation throughout the industry. Change is happening because of these timely and honest conversations, but in the meantime, Baumit remains a testament to equal opportunities and gender equality in the construction workplace. Visit:  https://www.baumit.co.uk  
    Aug 07, 2018 466
  • 03 Aug 2018
    With ever-greater pressure being applied to the private and commercial sector purse strings, the need for building projects to be completed on time without minimum fuss becomes more significant writes James Wilkinson. There is little margin for error for contractors working to tighter-than-before deadlines, and that includes ensuring the correct specification of a waterproof, durable flat roof system. But what are the challenges facing architects and contractors when selecting suitable flat roof insulation? And why do such roofs sometimes fail?  As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation should be considered to ensure it remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered systems can help alleviate risk when it comes to flat roofing. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with Gradient, a specialist roof insulation manufacturer which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of tapered solutions for a wide range of roofing applications. Fitting solution Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients fail to engage such companies at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks, for example can result in underperforming U-values and is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from Gradient. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation performance long before they start construction is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Condensing the risk Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Stark assessment For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the deadline. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com About the author: James Wilkinson is Design Team Leader at Gradient  
    411 Posted by Talk. Build
  • With ever-greater pressure being applied to the private and commercial sector purse strings, the need for building projects to be completed on time without minimum fuss becomes more significant writes James Wilkinson. There is little margin for error for contractors working to tighter-than-before deadlines, and that includes ensuring the correct specification of a waterproof, durable flat roof system. But what are the challenges facing architects and contractors when selecting suitable flat roof insulation? And why do such roofs sometimes fail?  As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation should be considered to ensure it remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered systems can help alleviate risk when it comes to flat roofing. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with Gradient, a specialist roof insulation manufacturer which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of tapered solutions for a wide range of roofing applications. Fitting solution Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients fail to engage such companies at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks, for example can result in underperforming U-values and is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from Gradient. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation performance long before they start construction is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Condensing the risk Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Stark assessment For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the deadline. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com About the author: James Wilkinson is Design Team Leader at Gradient  
    Aug 03, 2018 411