• 16 May 2018
    From their design to their hygiene, washrooms must be maintained regularly to make sure students feel comfortable using the services. Even a loose or a broken toilet door lock could compromise a child’s education; if a child feels as if he or she cannot use a facility comfortably, they may well return to a class unrelaxed, unfocussed and not in the best mind-set for learning. It is striking and even surprising to see how seemingly minor concerns such as toilet door locks have a negative effect on a child’s education and state of mind. Wellbeing is becoming more prominent in discussions on students mental and physical health; schools not only have a responsibility to educate, they must cultivate safe spaces for young people in the key stages of personal and individual development. Each area of a school building must be maintained to a standard which ensures a child’s education and wellbeing is not compromised, where their comfort should be of fundamental concern to school staff and the wider education sector at large. On the surface of things, it seems hard to envision why unequipped toilets could impact a child’s education and wellbeing. But if a child uses a toilet facility which does not have any soap, and then let’s say for some reason falls ill, then they will miss crucial learning time in the classroom. Maintaining clean and efficient toilets curbs absenteeism as children are healthy enough to attend lessons. But the argument does not just revolve around physical health, as mental health and wellbeing is a chief concern for school staff. If a washroom is not maintained appropriately, students will feel anxious using them, resulting in a decreased-attention span whilst at school. Whether it is lack of soap, broken toilet seats, or cracked mirrors, it is important to take into account these factors to address the broader concern of how it might impact a child’s frame of mind. More responsibility must be taken to improve toilet facilities in school environments, in order to increase student wellbeing, health and productivity. Schools must also shift their perspectives towards small concerns such as these as they will improve the school’s larger function. At the moment, poorly facilitated toilets are affecting attendance and wellbeing, thereby threatening the overall performance of a school. By shifting perspectives and taking more accountability when it comes to the state of school washrooms, we might enhance students’ wellbeing and find solutions to prevent absenteeism. Visit: https://www.interfixgroup.com
    498 Posted by Talk. Build
  • From their design to their hygiene, washrooms must be maintained regularly to make sure students feel comfortable using the services. Even a loose or a broken toilet door lock could compromise a child’s education; if a child feels as if he or she cannot use a facility comfortably, they may well return to a class unrelaxed, unfocussed and not in the best mind-set for learning. It is striking and even surprising to see how seemingly minor concerns such as toilet door locks have a negative effect on a child’s education and state of mind. Wellbeing is becoming more prominent in discussions on students mental and physical health; schools not only have a responsibility to educate, they must cultivate safe spaces for young people in the key stages of personal and individual development. Each area of a school building must be maintained to a standard which ensures a child’s education and wellbeing is not compromised, where their comfort should be of fundamental concern to school staff and the wider education sector at large. On the surface of things, it seems hard to envision why unequipped toilets could impact a child’s education and wellbeing. But if a child uses a toilet facility which does not have any soap, and then let’s say for some reason falls ill, then they will miss crucial learning time in the classroom. Maintaining clean and efficient toilets curbs absenteeism as children are healthy enough to attend lessons. But the argument does not just revolve around physical health, as mental health and wellbeing is a chief concern for school staff. If a washroom is not maintained appropriately, students will feel anxious using them, resulting in a decreased-attention span whilst at school. Whether it is lack of soap, broken toilet seats, or cracked mirrors, it is important to take into account these factors to address the broader concern of how it might impact a child’s frame of mind. More responsibility must be taken to improve toilet facilities in school environments, in order to increase student wellbeing, health and productivity. Schools must also shift their perspectives towards small concerns such as these as they will improve the school’s larger function. At the moment, poorly facilitated toilets are affecting attendance and wellbeing, thereby threatening the overall performance of a school. By shifting perspectives and taking more accountability when it comes to the state of school washrooms, we might enhance students’ wellbeing and find solutions to prevent absenteeism. Visit: https://www.interfixgroup.com
    May 16, 2018 498
  • 14 May 2018
    There is no denying that the specification of metal ceilings has seen huge growth over the past 30 years. Metal is now the go-to ceiling material, superseding mineral fibre as the mainstay of modern workplace and infrastructure projects. An indispensable tool in the architect’s design arsenal, metal is a cost-effective and desirable material meeting contemporary interior demands. Metal creates visual impact, provides essential acoustic control and allows specifiers to add drama and confidence to an interior. So what is the secret to metal’s desirability and popularity as a ceiling material? Buildings sympathetic to the changing needs of occupiers is increasingly key. The rise of open plan offices with diverse, agile and collaborative spaces is the new norm. This requires designers to pioneer solutions that meet these changing occupier demands. As a reflective material, specifying a metal ceiling might seem counterintuitive for effective acoustic control. However, they provide excellent acoustic regulation, controlling reverberance and occupational noise. The level of acoustic absorption required will depend on the size of space, materials used and occupier density. A range of acoustic infill panels combined with appropriate perforations will effectively control unwanted noise in the majority of spaces. Depending on performance demands, metal ceilings will typically offer the benchmark ‘Class A’ acoustic absorption. Design flexibility In today’s changing spaces, manufacturers have had to develop multi-functional, yet beautiful solutions. Metal ceiling systems allow the designer curved, waveform, trapezoidal and even multi-faceted options. Transition and perimeter trims also offer the advantage of specifying different metal systems within one coherent and integrated design. In addition, metal ceilings can now incorporate a wide range of finishes and effects. Another advantage of metal ceilings is they work flexibly with partitioning allowing occupiers to rethink space. As traditional working practices change, the ability to adapt spaces cost-effectively is increasingly attractive. Maintenance and Durability A long-term investment for any project, metal maintains its appearance considerably longer than lower quality ceiling materials. Metal ceilings are impervious to many of the common factors you would associate with ceiling degradation. For example, a non-porous material, metal does not suffer from increased loading, sagging or unsightly stains from burst water pipes. Neither will dust and grime permeate the surface. This robust, hardwearing material maintains its appearance, offers ease of maintenance and full access to ceiling voids. Sustainability Steel and aluminium are the most widely recycled and reused materials in construction, the benchmark for waste reduction. These highly sustainable materials can be 100% recycled and re-used repeatedly without degradation of quality. Value A recent report by SAS International considered the long-term value of metal over other ceiling materials. When considering the increased life expectancy and ease of maintenance, metal demonstrated a 47% cost saving over a 20-year period. Service Integration Ceilings often combine with or discretely hide otherwise unsightly M&E services. Metal has always been an ideal material to integrate lighting and other services within a considered and functioning design. As part of a fire protection system*, metal ceilings can also accommodate additional services such as sprinklers and smoke detectors. However, as we move closer and closer to more intelligent and smarter buildings, the possibilities of integrating technology are endless. The world’s most sustainable office Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. Sustainability was an overarching objective for Michael Bloomberg from day one. He insisted on a considerate design from an architectural and performance perspective. For SAS’ Special Projects team - which oversaw the design, manufacture and eventual installation of the scheme onsite - this was a truly collaborative project and one that saw the company deliver 24,000m2 of SAS product. The stunning petal-shaped ceiling is aesthetically striking and plays a significant part in a building that pushes the boundaries of sustainability. In total, 3,916 Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) were manufactured and installed with an impressive 2.5 million petals attached to them. The petal shape is not just an architectural feature; it has been optimised by specialist software modelling to give the best possible acoustic, thermal and light reflecting performance. The sculpted shape maximises surface area to improve heat exchange and optimises airflow to maximise convection. The slots allow air to pass through, which also improves performance. In short, and from a temperature control perspective, the design exceeds Category A Thermal comfort, the highest level achievable for an office. In terms of lighting, the role that LED lighting takes is a lesson in efficiency and sustainable design. The ICPs feature 500,000 LED lights and use 40% less energy than a typical office design. Due to the number of LEDs used, they run significantly below maximum output for the required light levels. They are even more efficient when cooled and operate with an increased life expectancy. The cumulative effect is an incredibly efficient design, consuming significantly less energy than is typical in office space. Acoustically, the design of the metal ceiling performs exceptionally well. The slotted petals and the perforations mean that the surface is sufficiently open to allow enough sound to come through to the mineral wool behind. Tested to Class A absorption levels, the ceiling impressively and precisely manages acoustic reverberation across the open plan offices. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." When it comes to metal as a material for ceilings there are virtually no limits to what can be achieved; it is possible to turn an imaginative concept into a colourful and truly inspired design. By working closely with leading manufacturers such as SAS International, there is an opportunity to bring an architect’s vision to reality. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/ * It is not recommended that a suspended ceiling be relied upon to protect the structural elements of a building. Metal ceiling systems should be tested and certified in accordance with UK and European standards.  
    572 Posted by Talk. Build
  • There is no denying that the specification of metal ceilings has seen huge growth over the past 30 years. Metal is now the go-to ceiling material, superseding mineral fibre as the mainstay of modern workplace and infrastructure projects. An indispensable tool in the architect’s design arsenal, metal is a cost-effective and desirable material meeting contemporary interior demands. Metal creates visual impact, provides essential acoustic control and allows specifiers to add drama and confidence to an interior. So what is the secret to metal’s desirability and popularity as a ceiling material? Buildings sympathetic to the changing needs of occupiers is increasingly key. The rise of open plan offices with diverse, agile and collaborative spaces is the new norm. This requires designers to pioneer solutions that meet these changing occupier demands. As a reflective material, specifying a metal ceiling might seem counterintuitive for effective acoustic control. However, they provide excellent acoustic regulation, controlling reverberance and occupational noise. The level of acoustic absorption required will depend on the size of space, materials used and occupier density. A range of acoustic infill panels combined with appropriate perforations will effectively control unwanted noise in the majority of spaces. Depending on performance demands, metal ceilings will typically offer the benchmark ‘Class A’ acoustic absorption. Design flexibility In today’s changing spaces, manufacturers have had to develop multi-functional, yet beautiful solutions. Metal ceiling systems allow the designer curved, waveform, trapezoidal and even multi-faceted options. Transition and perimeter trims also offer the advantage of specifying different metal systems within one coherent and integrated design. In addition, metal ceilings can now incorporate a wide range of finishes and effects. Another advantage of metal ceilings is they work flexibly with partitioning allowing occupiers to rethink space. As traditional working practices change, the ability to adapt spaces cost-effectively is increasingly attractive. Maintenance and Durability A long-term investment for any project, metal maintains its appearance considerably longer than lower quality ceiling materials. Metal ceilings are impervious to many of the common factors you would associate with ceiling degradation. For example, a non-porous material, metal does not suffer from increased loading, sagging or unsightly stains from burst water pipes. Neither will dust and grime permeate the surface. This robust, hardwearing material maintains its appearance, offers ease of maintenance and full access to ceiling voids. Sustainability Steel and aluminium are the most widely recycled and reused materials in construction, the benchmark for waste reduction. These highly sustainable materials can be 100% recycled and re-used repeatedly without degradation of quality. Value A recent report by SAS International considered the long-term value of metal over other ceiling materials. When considering the increased life expectancy and ease of maintenance, metal demonstrated a 47% cost saving over a 20-year period. Service Integration Ceilings often combine with or discretely hide otherwise unsightly M&E services. Metal has always been an ideal material to integrate lighting and other services within a considered and functioning design. As part of a fire protection system*, metal ceilings can also accommodate additional services such as sprinklers and smoke detectors. However, as we move closer and closer to more intelligent and smarter buildings, the possibilities of integrating technology are endless. The world’s most sustainable office Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. Sustainability was an overarching objective for Michael Bloomberg from day one. He insisted on a considerate design from an architectural and performance perspective. For SAS’ Special Projects team - which oversaw the design, manufacture and eventual installation of the scheme onsite - this was a truly collaborative project and one that saw the company deliver 24,000m2 of SAS product. The stunning petal-shaped ceiling is aesthetically striking and plays a significant part in a building that pushes the boundaries of sustainability. In total, 3,916 Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) were manufactured and installed with an impressive 2.5 million petals attached to them. The petal shape is not just an architectural feature; it has been optimised by specialist software modelling to give the best possible acoustic, thermal and light reflecting performance. The sculpted shape maximises surface area to improve heat exchange and optimises airflow to maximise convection. The slots allow air to pass through, which also improves performance. In short, and from a temperature control perspective, the design exceeds Category A Thermal comfort, the highest level achievable for an office. In terms of lighting, the role that LED lighting takes is a lesson in efficiency and sustainable design. The ICPs feature 500,000 LED lights and use 40% less energy than a typical office design. Due to the number of LEDs used, they run significantly below maximum output for the required light levels. They are even more efficient when cooled and operate with an increased life expectancy. The cumulative effect is an incredibly efficient design, consuming significantly less energy than is typical in office space. Acoustically, the design of the metal ceiling performs exceptionally well. The slotted petals and the perforations mean that the surface is sufficiently open to allow enough sound to come through to the mineral wool behind. Tested to Class A absorption levels, the ceiling impressively and precisely manages acoustic reverberation across the open plan offices. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." When it comes to metal as a material for ceilings there are virtually no limits to what can be achieved; it is possible to turn an imaginative concept into a colourful and truly inspired design. By working closely with leading manufacturers such as SAS International, there is an opportunity to bring an architect’s vision to reality. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/ * It is not recommended that a suspended ceiling be relied upon to protect the structural elements of a building. Metal ceiling systems should be tested and certified in accordance with UK and European standards.  
    May 14, 2018 572
  • 10 May 2018
    In an ever-changing world of design and our eager desire for the latest products, we often find ourselves reaching for the latest trends and fashions.  Believe it or not, this is also very much the case in the world of rooflights. The want for new, sleek, modern-looking products is forever something that rooflight manufacturers seek to provide and serve. This is particularly the case when it comes to the choice of glazing with many different options, colours and versatilities available from polycarbonate to GRP to glass. It is commonplace on existing and new builds to find daylight beaming into a building, the benefits of which have been reported widely for many years, particularly in the world of health and education.  While the health, productivity and wellbeing benefits remain, the trends change. Glass has become very prominent within today’s wants and designs, and has become a trendsetter across the rooflight industry.  Many options exist from Flat Glass Rooflights, Curved Glass, Mono Pitches, Dual Pitches and Atria. Designability When glass is combined with a quality rooflight system it can look exceptional, work well, be energy efficient as well as offering a whole host of additional features and benefits.  From stunning, jaw-dropping architectural masterpieces snaking their way across a roof to huge atria systems which catch your eye the moment you are beneath them; to the more commonplace flat glass and modular systems available, glass rooflights play a major part in contemporary architecture. Designed to meet a myriad of project requirements, glass rooflights offer versatility so it’s imperative that specifiers look at the options available to assess the most appropriate product for a project. When looking around for your best solution it is vital to look at all factors or noted ‘benefits’ of the product including thermally broken frames, U-values, acoustic performance and even self-cleaning glass. It’s also vital to consider the safety issue.  Many of us spend time, often without actually realising it, standing beneath or working on a roof within the vicinity of glass. Glass rooflights may look the same to the untrained eye but there can be stark differences between the costs of these units. There is usually a good reason for this and more often than not, if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find significant differences in the glazing specification, which makes big differences to both thermal performance and safety. The most economic solution is often not the best, or as efficient as you first thought. Safety first When assessing the options available and whilst trying to find the best product at the best price, it’s important to take time to understand the following: glass rooflights should always be specified to consider the safety of both building users beneath the rooflights, and anyone above who may inadvertently step and fall onto the rooflight. Industry regulatory guidance (for example see NARM Glass specification guide, at http://www.narm.org.uk/products/glass/specific-guide states that all glass rooflights should have a laminated inner pane to minimise risk of any glass falling into the room if the inner pane should break, even though BS5516 does set out certain circumstances/locations when a toughened inner pane can be used, subject to satisfactory risk assessment. In addition to using a laminated inner pane to protect building users, rooflights can be specified and designed to be non-fragile to CWCT Technical Note 92, and ACR[M]001. This is intended to ensure the safety of anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight and to ensure that anyone accidentally walking or falling onto the rooflight will not fall through, even if the glass is broken or the rooflight is damaged.  The preferred specification should always be for rooflights which are both non-fragile and which have a laminated inner pane, protecting both anyone beneath the rooflight and anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight. Across the industry, there is now an infinite variety of rooflight shapes, sizes and glazing options to suit flat, pitched and curved roof applications, whether it is a small dome-light in a domestic kitchen or polycarbonate and GRP sheeting used in stadium canopy applications. To summarise, choose a rooflight manufacturer that provides a great looking product at a reasonable price and one that can back up and support their claims of performance and service. This might appear to be a time consuming exercise, but this is far outweighed by the safe and long-lasting benefits of a great product. Through the synergy between rooflight manufacturers and specifiers working together, it is possible to design, produce and achieve some of the most beautiful ‘daylight enhancements’ ever dreamt of on a building.  Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com/
    616 Posted by Talk. Build
  • In an ever-changing world of design and our eager desire for the latest products, we often find ourselves reaching for the latest trends and fashions.  Believe it or not, this is also very much the case in the world of rooflights. The want for new, sleek, modern-looking products is forever something that rooflight manufacturers seek to provide and serve. This is particularly the case when it comes to the choice of glazing with many different options, colours and versatilities available from polycarbonate to GRP to glass. It is commonplace on existing and new builds to find daylight beaming into a building, the benefits of which have been reported widely for many years, particularly in the world of health and education.  While the health, productivity and wellbeing benefits remain, the trends change. Glass has become very prominent within today’s wants and designs, and has become a trendsetter across the rooflight industry.  Many options exist from Flat Glass Rooflights, Curved Glass, Mono Pitches, Dual Pitches and Atria. Designability When glass is combined with a quality rooflight system it can look exceptional, work well, be energy efficient as well as offering a whole host of additional features and benefits.  From stunning, jaw-dropping architectural masterpieces snaking their way across a roof to huge atria systems which catch your eye the moment you are beneath them; to the more commonplace flat glass and modular systems available, glass rooflights play a major part in contemporary architecture. Designed to meet a myriad of project requirements, glass rooflights offer versatility so it’s imperative that specifiers look at the options available to assess the most appropriate product for a project. When looking around for your best solution it is vital to look at all factors or noted ‘benefits’ of the product including thermally broken frames, U-values, acoustic performance and even self-cleaning glass. It’s also vital to consider the safety issue.  Many of us spend time, often without actually realising it, standing beneath or working on a roof within the vicinity of glass. Glass rooflights may look the same to the untrained eye but there can be stark differences between the costs of these units. There is usually a good reason for this and more often than not, if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find significant differences in the glazing specification, which makes big differences to both thermal performance and safety. The most economic solution is often not the best, or as efficient as you first thought. Safety first When assessing the options available and whilst trying to find the best product at the best price, it’s important to take time to understand the following: glass rooflights should always be specified to consider the safety of both building users beneath the rooflights, and anyone above who may inadvertently step and fall onto the rooflight. Industry regulatory guidance (for example see NARM Glass specification guide, at http://www.narm.org.uk/products/glass/specific-guide states that all glass rooflights should have a laminated inner pane to minimise risk of any glass falling into the room if the inner pane should break, even though BS5516 does set out certain circumstances/locations when a toughened inner pane can be used, subject to satisfactory risk assessment. In addition to using a laminated inner pane to protect building users, rooflights can be specified and designed to be non-fragile to CWCT Technical Note 92, and ACR[M]001. This is intended to ensure the safety of anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight and to ensure that anyone accidentally walking or falling onto the rooflight will not fall through, even if the glass is broken or the rooflight is damaged.  The preferred specification should always be for rooflights which are both non-fragile and which have a laminated inner pane, protecting both anyone beneath the rooflight and anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight. Across the industry, there is now an infinite variety of rooflight shapes, sizes and glazing options to suit flat, pitched and curved roof applications, whether it is a small dome-light in a domestic kitchen or polycarbonate and GRP sheeting used in stadium canopy applications. To summarise, choose a rooflight manufacturer that provides a great looking product at a reasonable price and one that can back up and support their claims of performance and service. This might appear to be a time consuming exercise, but this is far outweighed by the safe and long-lasting benefits of a great product. Through the synergy between rooflight manufacturers and specifiers working together, it is possible to design, produce and achieve some of the most beautiful ‘daylight enhancements’ ever dreamt of on a building.  Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com/
    May 10, 2018 616
  • 09 May 2018
    Which came first – the chicken or the egg? Who would have thought the age-old question would apply to construction material selection, but it certainly is relevant for contractors working on projects pursuing Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) version 4 (v4) certification writes Tommy Linstroth, founder and CEO of Green Badger. LEED is the predominate green building certification in the US and is required on most federally funded projects as well as many state, local and university projects. Odds are, if you’re a contractor who does any public work, you’re faced with LEED certification (it also often required in the private sector, with 80+% of Fortune 100 companies requiring it). While many contractors are familiar with the requirements of the older version of LEED, Version 4 (which became mandatory for projects registered last year and new) is a whole new challenge – specifically, the availability of compliant materials. So back to the chicken or the egg - in the case of LEED v4 and the materials market – the answer is abundantly clear. LEED v4 came much sooner than manufacturers and project teams were ready for. To earn the credits in v4, products must now have Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) or Health Product Declarations (HPDs). There are other contributing certifications, but these two are the most recognizable. The challenge is there aren’t all that many products that have either one. The process for a manufacturer to generate an EPD could take over a year – so even those jumping on board today won’t have products that comply until 2019. So where can contractors look to find products that meet the criteria? First, let’s talk about what they need. To earn the credits, contractors need to use 20 products with EPDs, and/or 20 products with HPDs (there are 2 separate credits available, one for each). To make it even more complicated, EPDs come in two versions – industry wide, which only count as ½ a product, or product specific, which count in full. Industry wide means any product in that category complies, regardless of manufacturer. For example, Type X Gypsum board has an industry-wide EPD – any type X gypsum board from a manufacturer who is a member of the North American Gypsum Association can utilize that industry-wide EPD. While it only counts for ½, it is a broad enough certification that you can start to find a lot of products with it. Product specific, on the other hand, is an EPD for a specific product from a certain manufacturer – i.e ½” Fire Rated Gypsum Board from ABC Co – and counts in full. Between the two, contractors need to get a total of at least twenty to earn the point (this could be 10 industry-wide, and 15 product specific, or any combination of, etc). That still bodes the question – of the thousands of products and components that make up a building being constructed, where can contractors narrow their search for compliant products? Below are some categories of products contractors can start with before they dive down rabbit holes to find an EPD or HPD.  WOOD Most wood in North America will fall under the American Wood Council’s Industry Wide EPDs (that only count as a half-point each), but include softwood plywood, softwood lumber, OSB, LVLs, Glu-Lam timbers, I-joists, MDF, and particle board. You can easily pick up a handful of those w/o much work. Huber’s popular ZIP, Advantech an TruSpec products all have Product Specific Type 3 EPDs as well. WALLS, CEILING TILES AND GRID One of the most robust categories, Armstrong, CertainTeed and USG all offer a host of options with EPDs, HPDs and other Material Ingredient Reporting. Since you can use up to 5 products per manufacturer, if you are savvy, you can get a quarter of your EPD and MIR accounted for just in your ceilings. National Gypsum has over a dozen products with HPDs, and there is an industry-wide EPD for Type X Gyp Board. INSULATION Insulation is another opportunity to get multiple products within the same manufacturer. While the choices are somewhat limited, CertainTeed and Knauff both offer thermal, acoustical, and mechanical insulation products with EPDs (and some with HPDs) FLOORING Flooring is the mother lode of EPDs and HPDs. Contractors could probably find all twenty products for each credit in this category alone, with products that include carpet, tile, VCT, linoleum, rubber flooring, cove base and all the associated adhesives behind them. Consider yourself in good shape with products from Armstrong, Beaulieu, Bentley Mills, Crossville, American Olean Tile, Daltile, ECORE, Emser, Forbo, Interface, Milliken, Mohawk, Patcraft and Shaw, while Laticrete, WF Taylor and XL Brands provide plenty of options to hold those products in place. ROOFING Contractors have options on top of the building almost no matter what type of roof is specified. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has industry wide EPDs for asphalt-based roofs, including mod-bit, built-up and shingles, while multiple manufacturers have EPDs for PVC membrane roofs including Carlisle, Duro-Last and GAF. PAINTS Paints have you covered (ha!) as well. Benjamin Moore, PPG, Sherwin Williams and ECOS all have a line (or more) that have EPDs and/or MIR compatibility. Also note, each sheen counts as a distinct product, so you can count a primer, flat, semi-gloss and gloss as 4 individual products for both EPDs and HPDs. METALS Products that are using structural steel or metal studs are in luck. There are industry wide EPDs for structural steel, joists, and deck, and some product specific EPDs for Rebar from Gerdeau, CMC, and Re-Steel and interior metal framing and accessories from Merino+Ware – enough to pick up another 5 products. DOORS/WINDOWS/HARDWARE This category offers an unexpected wealth of options. If your project has commercial entries/windows/storefronts, a number of options exist from YKK, Assa Abloy and Kawneer, and there are a surprising number of door hinges, locks, stoppers, openers and hardware that have EPDs from the likes of Norton, Pemko, Sargent and Schlage. While this of course is not a comprehensive list of all the products and categories that offer EPDs or HPDs, these 8 product categories are found on most commercial construction projects. Contracts can focus their efforts around these categories to not spend hundreds of hours trying to track down information on every nail and screw, and instead focus on getting their projects complete on time and on budget – while still reaching their certification goals. Visit: http://getgreenbadger.com
    547 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Which came first – the chicken or the egg? Who would have thought the age-old question would apply to construction material selection, but it certainly is relevant for contractors working on projects pursuing Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) version 4 (v4) certification writes Tommy Linstroth, founder and CEO of Green Badger. LEED is the predominate green building certification in the US and is required on most federally funded projects as well as many state, local and university projects. Odds are, if you’re a contractor who does any public work, you’re faced with LEED certification (it also often required in the private sector, with 80+% of Fortune 100 companies requiring it). While many contractors are familiar with the requirements of the older version of LEED, Version 4 (which became mandatory for projects registered last year and new) is a whole new challenge – specifically, the availability of compliant materials. So back to the chicken or the egg - in the case of LEED v4 and the materials market – the answer is abundantly clear. LEED v4 came much sooner than manufacturers and project teams were ready for. To earn the credits in v4, products must now have Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) or Health Product Declarations (HPDs). There are other contributing certifications, but these two are the most recognizable. The challenge is there aren’t all that many products that have either one. The process for a manufacturer to generate an EPD could take over a year – so even those jumping on board today won’t have products that comply until 2019. So where can contractors look to find products that meet the criteria? First, let’s talk about what they need. To earn the credits, contractors need to use 20 products with EPDs, and/or 20 products with HPDs (there are 2 separate credits available, one for each). To make it even more complicated, EPDs come in two versions – industry wide, which only count as ½ a product, or product specific, which count in full. Industry wide means any product in that category complies, regardless of manufacturer. For example, Type X Gypsum board has an industry-wide EPD – any type X gypsum board from a manufacturer who is a member of the North American Gypsum Association can utilize that industry-wide EPD. While it only counts for ½, it is a broad enough certification that you can start to find a lot of products with it. Product specific, on the other hand, is an EPD for a specific product from a certain manufacturer – i.e ½” Fire Rated Gypsum Board from ABC Co – and counts in full. Between the two, contractors need to get a total of at least twenty to earn the point (this could be 10 industry-wide, and 15 product specific, or any combination of, etc). That still bodes the question – of the thousands of products and components that make up a building being constructed, where can contractors narrow their search for compliant products? Below are some categories of products contractors can start with before they dive down rabbit holes to find an EPD or HPD.  WOOD Most wood in North America will fall under the American Wood Council’s Industry Wide EPDs (that only count as a half-point each), but include softwood plywood, softwood lumber, OSB, LVLs, Glu-Lam timbers, I-joists, MDF, and particle board. You can easily pick up a handful of those w/o much work. Huber’s popular ZIP, Advantech an TruSpec products all have Product Specific Type 3 EPDs as well. WALLS, CEILING TILES AND GRID One of the most robust categories, Armstrong, CertainTeed and USG all offer a host of options with EPDs, HPDs and other Material Ingredient Reporting. Since you can use up to 5 products per manufacturer, if you are savvy, you can get a quarter of your EPD and MIR accounted for just in your ceilings. National Gypsum has over a dozen products with HPDs, and there is an industry-wide EPD for Type X Gyp Board. INSULATION Insulation is another opportunity to get multiple products within the same manufacturer. While the choices are somewhat limited, CertainTeed and Knauff both offer thermal, acoustical, and mechanical insulation products with EPDs (and some with HPDs) FLOORING Flooring is the mother lode of EPDs and HPDs. Contractors could probably find all twenty products for each credit in this category alone, with products that include carpet, tile, VCT, linoleum, rubber flooring, cove base and all the associated adhesives behind them. Consider yourself in good shape with products from Armstrong, Beaulieu, Bentley Mills, Crossville, American Olean Tile, Daltile, ECORE, Emser, Forbo, Interface, Milliken, Mohawk, Patcraft and Shaw, while Laticrete, WF Taylor and XL Brands provide plenty of options to hold those products in place. ROOFING Contractors have options on top of the building almost no matter what type of roof is specified. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has industry wide EPDs for asphalt-based roofs, including mod-bit, built-up and shingles, while multiple manufacturers have EPDs for PVC membrane roofs including Carlisle, Duro-Last and GAF. PAINTS Paints have you covered (ha!) as well. Benjamin Moore, PPG, Sherwin Williams and ECOS all have a line (or more) that have EPDs and/or MIR compatibility. Also note, each sheen counts as a distinct product, so you can count a primer, flat, semi-gloss and gloss as 4 individual products for both EPDs and HPDs. METALS Products that are using structural steel or metal studs are in luck. There are industry wide EPDs for structural steel, joists, and deck, and some product specific EPDs for Rebar from Gerdeau, CMC, and Re-Steel and interior metal framing and accessories from Merino+Ware – enough to pick up another 5 products. DOORS/WINDOWS/HARDWARE This category offers an unexpected wealth of options. If your project has commercial entries/windows/storefronts, a number of options exist from YKK, Assa Abloy and Kawneer, and there are a surprising number of door hinges, locks, stoppers, openers and hardware that have EPDs from the likes of Norton, Pemko, Sargent and Schlage. While this of course is not a comprehensive list of all the products and categories that offer EPDs or HPDs, these 8 product categories are found on most commercial construction projects. Contracts can focus their efforts around these categories to not spend hundreds of hours trying to track down information on every nail and screw, and instead focus on getting their projects complete on time and on budget – while still reaching their certification goals. Visit: http://getgreenbadger.com
    May 09, 2018 547
  • 07 May 2018
    It took about 50 years for television to transform from black and white to glorious technicolour; the availability of pigmentation to give concrete shades other than grey took infinitely longer writes Lee Baldwin, Product Development Manager at Sika. The wait was worth it, however, as the colourisation of this otherwise drab-looking material has given it a new lease of life in terms of its usage; brightening our commercial and domestic worlds in the process.   From industrial units to art installations, coloured concrete has become a go-to solution for designers and the like who want their structures to look good as well as last. For the past 15 years or so, Sika has been among those leading the way in the development of the precious pigment that has allowed concrete structures be seen in a different light… and shade. The colourisation process involves adding liquid or powder-form pigmented metal oxides - mainly iron oxide – to a concrete mix. The dosage is normally 0.5 – 5.0% of the cement weight. Higher dosages do not enhance the colour intensity but may adversely affect the concrete quality. A range of primary colours are available such as yellow, red, black and white, which can be used to create a spectrum of shades.  No limits With concrete now able to sport coats of many colours there is no limit to how and where it can be used, dependent on whether it is designed to stand-out or blend-in with its environment. A good example of pigmented concrete’s harmonious capabilities can be seen at Payers Park, Folkestone where it was used in the formation of sandstone-coloured steps as part of a recent Sika-based project. The same properties also saw Sika’s colour range bring a certain gravitas and style to a humble seaside public toilet, which was deemed so at one with its coastal surroundings, the installation won a design award. Other recent commercial projects to benefit Sika Coloured Concrete include specification at the new Concorde Museum in Bristol, where it will be used to create dark grey flooring – a perfect accompaniment to the brilliant white supersonic plane it is to support. It’s also been selected as a colourful base for a skate park, the bright shades and tones in-keeping with the lively, fun-packed environment.   Solid alternative Pigmented concrete is also gaining favour as a domestic installation. Its durable, maintenance-free properties have led to its specification for driveways as a more solid alternative to tarmac. Chips and minor damaging to coloured concrete does little to spoil its look. The pigment runs throughout the concrete, therefore the surface and the underlying colour is the same. Kitchens, where coloured concrete creates hard, marble-like flooring, are also ideal. Sika Coloured Concrete was also used to create an attractive art installation at Queen Elizabeth Park in London. Pigmentation has added a new flexibility to concrete, this most unyielding of materials. Its grey days are over and a brighter, more colourful new era awaits.  Visit www.sika.co.uk.
    675 Posted by Talk. Build
  • It took about 50 years for television to transform from black and white to glorious technicolour; the availability of pigmentation to give concrete shades other than grey took infinitely longer writes Lee Baldwin, Product Development Manager at Sika. The wait was worth it, however, as the colourisation of this otherwise drab-looking material has given it a new lease of life in terms of its usage; brightening our commercial and domestic worlds in the process.   From industrial units to art installations, coloured concrete has become a go-to solution for designers and the like who want their structures to look good as well as last. For the past 15 years or so, Sika has been among those leading the way in the development of the precious pigment that has allowed concrete structures be seen in a different light… and shade. The colourisation process involves adding liquid or powder-form pigmented metal oxides - mainly iron oxide – to a concrete mix. The dosage is normally 0.5 – 5.0% of the cement weight. Higher dosages do not enhance the colour intensity but may adversely affect the concrete quality. A range of primary colours are available such as yellow, red, black and white, which can be used to create a spectrum of shades.  No limits With concrete now able to sport coats of many colours there is no limit to how and where it can be used, dependent on whether it is designed to stand-out or blend-in with its environment. A good example of pigmented concrete’s harmonious capabilities can be seen at Payers Park, Folkestone where it was used in the formation of sandstone-coloured steps as part of a recent Sika-based project. The same properties also saw Sika’s colour range bring a certain gravitas and style to a humble seaside public toilet, which was deemed so at one with its coastal surroundings, the installation won a design award. Other recent commercial projects to benefit Sika Coloured Concrete include specification at the new Concorde Museum in Bristol, where it will be used to create dark grey flooring – a perfect accompaniment to the brilliant white supersonic plane it is to support. It’s also been selected as a colourful base for a skate park, the bright shades and tones in-keeping with the lively, fun-packed environment.   Solid alternative Pigmented concrete is also gaining favour as a domestic installation. Its durable, maintenance-free properties have led to its specification for driveways as a more solid alternative to tarmac. Chips and minor damaging to coloured concrete does little to spoil its look. The pigment runs throughout the concrete, therefore the surface and the underlying colour is the same. Kitchens, where coloured concrete creates hard, marble-like flooring, are also ideal. Sika Coloured Concrete was also used to create an attractive art installation at Queen Elizabeth Park in London. Pigmentation has added a new flexibility to concrete, this most unyielding of materials. Its grey days are over and a brighter, more colourful new era awaits.  Visit www.sika.co.uk.
    May 07, 2018 675
  • 04 May 2018
    Choosing the right companies to work with can sometimes seem like a complicated process – CAD Design is no exception writes Krysta Jakson. The big question is - how do you know if you have picked the best company for your needs? A lot of the decisions you make will be based on personal choice, but there are a few things that you can consider that will help you narrow down that decision. 1.Location It is never a bad idea to look for a local company who can meet your requirements. Discussing what you need on the phone is one thing but it usually far easier to meet face to face and talk through your ideas and any problems. This is especially true when looking for a CAD building Design Company. You want to be able to look at the actual designs rather than just images sent to you on a computer screen. It will also make it easier for both you and the CAD designer to look at the designs and check for any issues or problems and make any amends that might be needed. 2.Experience Trusting another company to help you with your project can be a daunting process so ask to see examples of previous projects they have worked on. Ask if they have experience of working on projects like yours, this will give you a good indication of how they will be able to tackle the work you want from them and also whether they are aware of any of the problems that might occur. 3.They know and rules and regulations Where possible it is a good idea to choose a company located in the same country as your business. They will understand more about any local regulations and constraints that may need to be taken into consideration with your project. Picking a company in the same time zone means that it will be much easier for you to communicate. 4.What services do they offer? Ask what CAD services the company has to offer. Some of them will also offer BIM services. This will allow you to have several aspects of any product or project you are designing carried out under one roof, and ultimately will help with any alterations. 5.Can you talk to them? It’s always very important when finding a company to work with to find one you feel you can talk to properly or you may struggle to make changes. Finding the right CAD company for your next project shouldn’t be a snap decision. Do your research and ask questions to choose one that fits all your needs, and not just your budgetary ones. Visit: http://thecadroom.com/
    613 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Choosing the right companies to work with can sometimes seem like a complicated process – CAD Design is no exception writes Krysta Jakson. The big question is - how do you know if you have picked the best company for your needs? A lot of the decisions you make will be based on personal choice, but there are a few things that you can consider that will help you narrow down that decision. 1.Location It is never a bad idea to look for a local company who can meet your requirements. Discussing what you need on the phone is one thing but it usually far easier to meet face to face and talk through your ideas and any problems. This is especially true when looking for a CAD building Design Company. You want to be able to look at the actual designs rather than just images sent to you on a computer screen. It will also make it easier for both you and the CAD designer to look at the designs and check for any issues or problems and make any amends that might be needed. 2.Experience Trusting another company to help you with your project can be a daunting process so ask to see examples of previous projects they have worked on. Ask if they have experience of working on projects like yours, this will give you a good indication of how they will be able to tackle the work you want from them and also whether they are aware of any of the problems that might occur. 3.They know and rules and regulations Where possible it is a good idea to choose a company located in the same country as your business. They will understand more about any local regulations and constraints that may need to be taken into consideration with your project. Picking a company in the same time zone means that it will be much easier for you to communicate. 4.What services do they offer? Ask what CAD services the company has to offer. Some of them will also offer BIM services. This will allow you to have several aspects of any product or project you are designing carried out under one roof, and ultimately will help with any alterations. 5.Can you talk to them? It’s always very important when finding a company to work with to find one you feel you can talk to properly or you may struggle to make changes. Finding the right CAD company for your next project shouldn’t be a snap decision. Do your research and ask questions to choose one that fits all your needs, and not just your budgetary ones. Visit: http://thecadroom.com/
    May 04, 2018 613
  • 03 May 2018
    In September 2017, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) launched new regulations across America to address a worsening crisis in the labour world - silica exposure -constituting the first major shift in silica policy since 1971 writes Joshua Clark. Silica, if you work in construction, is a particle 100 times smaller than sand that is present in many building materials, particularly those containing quartz. Millions of these particles are released into the air during grinding, sanding, drilling, and similar processes. Without respiratory protection, it is easily inhaled and sucked into the deepest crevices of the lungs, where it remains lodged for the rest of the worker’s life. Scar tissue forms around the particles and eventually progresses to the point of silicosis, which has ended many careers and lives over the years. Kidney and obstructive pulmonary disease have also been documented. With approximately 2.3 million workers affected every year in the US, new regulations were long overdue. The six months that have passed have seen a flood of citations, with many more surely to come. There’s also been time for the National Association of Home Builders to initiate dialogue with OSHA to clarify ambiguous language in the rules. Progress will be gradual, but the prognosis looks good for a robust culture of prevention to develop, which is a long time coming for a workforce that has been suffering with this menace for generations. Under OSHA’s regulations, a workplace must be tested if it’s a candidate for silica exposure above the action level (25 μg/m³). If the reading is between 25 and 50, the test will be done periodically every six months to keep a record. If PEL can’t be brought below 50, official signage must be posted at all entrances marking the space as off-limits to anyone without protection. OSHA will be back every three months to test the levels. A comprehensive exposure control plan must be drafted by the employer, describing the tasks in the workplace that involve exposure. At least 30 days out of the year starting June 23, 2018, medical surveillance will be implemented on every worker who operates within the contaminated space.  On June 23, 2020 this requirement expands to all employees exposed above the action level. It is also the employer’s responsibility to inform their workers of the conditions they are working under, and the steps being taken to limit the hazards. At Enviro, we do our part by providing the best products on the market at highly competitive prices. The slight inconvenience of respiratory protection is totally worth it to avoid the devastation that silica can cause. You’ll find a curated selection of products that work great for silica protection here, and our general respiratory selection can be found here.  Guest blogger Joshua Clark, represents Enviro Safety Products, one of the oldest e-commerce sites online.  
    538 Posted by Talk. Build
  • In September 2017, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) launched new regulations across America to address a worsening crisis in the labour world - silica exposure -constituting the first major shift in silica policy since 1971 writes Joshua Clark. Silica, if you work in construction, is a particle 100 times smaller than sand that is present in many building materials, particularly those containing quartz. Millions of these particles are released into the air during grinding, sanding, drilling, and similar processes. Without respiratory protection, it is easily inhaled and sucked into the deepest crevices of the lungs, where it remains lodged for the rest of the worker’s life. Scar tissue forms around the particles and eventually progresses to the point of silicosis, which has ended many careers and lives over the years. Kidney and obstructive pulmonary disease have also been documented. With approximately 2.3 million workers affected every year in the US, new regulations were long overdue. The six months that have passed have seen a flood of citations, with many more surely to come. There’s also been time for the National Association of Home Builders to initiate dialogue with OSHA to clarify ambiguous language in the rules. Progress will be gradual, but the prognosis looks good for a robust culture of prevention to develop, which is a long time coming for a workforce that has been suffering with this menace for generations. Under OSHA’s regulations, a workplace must be tested if it’s a candidate for silica exposure above the action level (25 μg/m³). If the reading is between 25 and 50, the test will be done periodically every six months to keep a record. If PEL can’t be brought below 50, official signage must be posted at all entrances marking the space as off-limits to anyone without protection. OSHA will be back every three months to test the levels. A comprehensive exposure control plan must be drafted by the employer, describing the tasks in the workplace that involve exposure. At least 30 days out of the year starting June 23, 2018, medical surveillance will be implemented on every worker who operates within the contaminated space.  On June 23, 2020 this requirement expands to all employees exposed above the action level. It is also the employer’s responsibility to inform their workers of the conditions they are working under, and the steps being taken to limit the hazards. At Enviro, we do our part by providing the best products on the market at highly competitive prices. The slight inconvenience of respiratory protection is totally worth it to avoid the devastation that silica can cause. You’ll find a curated selection of products that work great for silica protection here, and our general respiratory selection can be found here.  Guest blogger Joshua Clark, represents Enviro Safety Products, one of the oldest e-commerce sites online.  
    May 03, 2018 538
  • 01 May 2018
    As a marketing agency we’re often asked to create websites for our construction and building based clients. When we sit down with them to discuss the site, one of the first questions we ask the client is “have you got your sitemap?” to which we often receive a blank expression or the response “eh, no”. All too often the sitemap is completely disregarded and very little, or no, consideration has been given to the planning or structure of the website. The sitemap is the most important part of planning a website, yet is often the most overlooked. Companies undervalue a good sitemap so the below tips will hopefully help you see the value, importance and difference a well thought out sitemap can make. What is a sitemap? Put in simple terms, a sitemap is the page structure of your website. It shows every page of your website, how these pages are linked and the various levels of content within your site. It illustrates how everything in your website is connected. Why is a sitemap so important? It makes you think about the content you place on your site and plan how users get to this content. It prompts you to put yourself in your customer’s shoes and ask “what do I want from this website and how do I find what I need?” It provides you with the opportunity and means to dictate the user journey. Sitemaps make visitors follow the path you want them to. It allows you to determine the number of clicks a user makes to get to a particular part of your website and then provides the opportunity to amend the content path if this proves to be a high number – remember the 3 click rule! Sitemaps influence design. We’re often asked to produce designs before a sitemap has been created and whilst we can do this, we don’t recommend it as the design often changes as a result of the sitemap. You wouldn’t design a kitchen without planning where best to place the appliances and the type of cupboards you want etc. so why design a website before you’ve planned the structure? It’s crucial for helping deliver a website within budget. Producing a sitemap makes you think about why you want a new website, the content, the user journey and more. If you can finalise this before you start the design and build, it can save you money as changes = cost. Sitemaps help search engines to index your website as accurately as possible. A clear, well-planned sitemap leads to more efficient crawling and more accurately displayed search results for your website. How do you start creating a sitemap? Sitemaps take a lot of planning and research. We suggest you ask yourself these questions: Why do you want a website? Do you want to sell products, generate leads, raise brand awareness etc.? Who are your target audiences and what do they want from your website? What are the measurable goals/calls to actions the website needs to achieve (for example, sample requests, marketing literature, bookings etc.)? What do your competitors offer in comparison to your company? How do you differ from your competitors? What information and level of information do you want to provide? How do you want to present your information (for example case studies, brochures, technical sheets etc.)? Do you want any sections/items of content to be searchable? If yes, what are the search criteria and can they be achieved via your CMS? Where do you want the user journey to end? For example, once a user has found the service they’re interested in, does their journey end here or do you direct them to relevant case studies? How do you want to group information? How many clicks does it take for the user to complete their journey? Once you have all this information you can begin plotting your sitemap. Start with your site’s top level navigation. What should these main sections be? Refer back to your objectives and what your customers want to help establish this. Remember these will be visible throughout the site so they need to be right. Try and keep things simple – with the number of sections and their titles. You want the design of the website to be clean and impactive so bear this in mind when deciding on the top level navigation. Once complete, you can look at the secondary pages – these tend to be where the more detailed information is held. Again, think about the user journey when planning these and how you want to provide information. Remember too many dropdown menus can be off-putting for users. Review and amend With your sitemap complete, you can start to visualise your website and the user journey. Ask others to review it as a fresh set of eyes can provide valuable input. It can take several attempts to get a sitemap right so don’t be afraid to make changes or to invest the time needed to get it right for your business. A final note Sitemaps really are the most important part of planning a website. They can aid with the planning and production of content, the user journey, timescale and budget, design and more. Investing time in producing a good sitemap won’t be wasted, so give it a go and reap the benefit. Visit: https://www.wearefabrick.com/home  
    596 Posted by Talk. Build
  • As a marketing agency we’re often asked to create websites for our construction and building based clients. When we sit down with them to discuss the site, one of the first questions we ask the client is “have you got your sitemap?” to which we often receive a blank expression or the response “eh, no”. All too often the sitemap is completely disregarded and very little, or no, consideration has been given to the planning or structure of the website. The sitemap is the most important part of planning a website, yet is often the most overlooked. Companies undervalue a good sitemap so the below tips will hopefully help you see the value, importance and difference a well thought out sitemap can make. What is a sitemap? Put in simple terms, a sitemap is the page structure of your website. It shows every page of your website, how these pages are linked and the various levels of content within your site. It illustrates how everything in your website is connected. Why is a sitemap so important? It makes you think about the content you place on your site and plan how users get to this content. It prompts you to put yourself in your customer’s shoes and ask “what do I want from this website and how do I find what I need?” It provides you with the opportunity and means to dictate the user journey. Sitemaps make visitors follow the path you want them to. It allows you to determine the number of clicks a user makes to get to a particular part of your website and then provides the opportunity to amend the content path if this proves to be a high number – remember the 3 click rule! Sitemaps influence design. We’re often asked to produce designs before a sitemap has been created and whilst we can do this, we don’t recommend it as the design often changes as a result of the sitemap. You wouldn’t design a kitchen without planning where best to place the appliances and the type of cupboards you want etc. so why design a website before you’ve planned the structure? It’s crucial for helping deliver a website within budget. Producing a sitemap makes you think about why you want a new website, the content, the user journey and more. If you can finalise this before you start the design and build, it can save you money as changes = cost. Sitemaps help search engines to index your website as accurately as possible. A clear, well-planned sitemap leads to more efficient crawling and more accurately displayed search results for your website. How do you start creating a sitemap? Sitemaps take a lot of planning and research. We suggest you ask yourself these questions: Why do you want a website? Do you want to sell products, generate leads, raise brand awareness etc.? Who are your target audiences and what do they want from your website? What are the measurable goals/calls to actions the website needs to achieve (for example, sample requests, marketing literature, bookings etc.)? What do your competitors offer in comparison to your company? How do you differ from your competitors? What information and level of information do you want to provide? How do you want to present your information (for example case studies, brochures, technical sheets etc.)? Do you want any sections/items of content to be searchable? If yes, what are the search criteria and can they be achieved via your CMS? Where do you want the user journey to end? For example, once a user has found the service they’re interested in, does their journey end here or do you direct them to relevant case studies? How do you want to group information? How many clicks does it take for the user to complete their journey? Once you have all this information you can begin plotting your sitemap. Start with your site’s top level navigation. What should these main sections be? Refer back to your objectives and what your customers want to help establish this. Remember these will be visible throughout the site so they need to be right. Try and keep things simple – with the number of sections and their titles. You want the design of the website to be clean and impactive so bear this in mind when deciding on the top level navigation. Once complete, you can look at the secondary pages – these tend to be where the more detailed information is held. Again, think about the user journey when planning these and how you want to provide information. Remember too many dropdown menus can be off-putting for users. Review and amend With your sitemap complete, you can start to visualise your website and the user journey. Ask others to review it as a fresh set of eyes can provide valuable input. It can take several attempts to get a sitemap right so don’t be afraid to make changes or to invest the time needed to get it right for your business. A final note Sitemaps really are the most important part of planning a website. They can aid with the planning and production of content, the user journey, timescale and budget, design and more. Investing time in producing a good sitemap won’t be wasted, so give it a go and reap the benefit. Visit: https://www.wearefabrick.com/home  
    May 01, 2018 596
  • 30 Apr 2018
    Much has been written about damp and condensation in homes which can cause considerable damage and health issues. Industry reports suggest that almost seven million properties could be at risk in the UK affecting up to 16 million occupants. At the most optimistic level at least 2% of properties are affected by condensation. Condensation and dampness also accounts for poor health, in particular asthma, with the UK recording more than 1,000 deaths from this disease in 2014, one of the highest instances in the world. Condensation can eventually lead to damp and mould on walls, ceilings and behind furniture. Other factors causing damp comes from leaking pipes and roofs and from blocked gutters. Rising damp from the ground can also be a problem and is usually where a damp course is defective. This can be identified by a white tidemark on the walls. It’s a massive problem so let’s get the facts. It is impossible to avoid some condensation in properties but you can minimise the risk by ensuring you have proper heating and most importantly of all - good ventilation. It is estimated that four people living in a three bedroom property would create 112 pints of moisture a week from just breathing, cooking, showering and boiling the kettle. But if you constantly have to wipe condensation off your windows and have a dehumidifier running for lengthy periods of time then you need to consider installing better ventilation in every part of the property. (see link below) In such cases you need to call in the experts for a home survey but there are a few things you can do in the meantime to ease the situation The ideal temperature at home should range between 19-22 degrees Celsius in living rooms, kitchen and bathroom, and 16-20 degrees Celsius in bedrooms. Good insulation is also advised as it creates warmer walls and ceilings, and inhibits mould growth by preventing condensation from forming on them. Airtight windows and buildings require more active ventilation. You can also ventilate your home without making draughts to reduce moisture. Try keeping a small window ajar when someone is in the room or if your windows have been recently renewed open the trickle ventilators provided. Ventilate kitchens and bathrooms when in use by opening the windows wider, or better still, use a humidity-controlled electric fan if one is fitted. Close the kitchen and bathroom doors when these rooms are in use, even if your kitchen and bathroom has an extractor fan. This will help prevent moisture reaching other rooms, especially bedrooms, which are often colder and more likely to get condensation. Do not block air-brick vents, ventilate cupboards and wardrobes and avoid putting too many things in cupboards and wardrobes as this stops the air circulating. Do not block permanent ventilators or chimneys by ensuring that you leave a hole about two bricks in size and fit a louvered grille over it. Reducing draughts in rooms where there is condensation or mould is also a NO. Householders are also recommended to keep washing, boiling kettles and any other items that form steam or moisture to be kept to a minimum, but if all efforts fail and mould begins to form then you will probably need a fungicidal wash to get rid of the problem. As already discussed – the major factor is good ventilation. There are many products available on line to consider. Just click the link for an example. Click here to visit Amazon    
    628 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Much has been written about damp and condensation in homes which can cause considerable damage and health issues. Industry reports suggest that almost seven million properties could be at risk in the UK affecting up to 16 million occupants. At the most optimistic level at least 2% of properties are affected by condensation. Condensation and dampness also accounts for poor health, in particular asthma, with the UK recording more than 1,000 deaths from this disease in 2014, one of the highest instances in the world. Condensation can eventually lead to damp and mould on walls, ceilings and behind furniture. Other factors causing damp comes from leaking pipes and roofs and from blocked gutters. Rising damp from the ground can also be a problem and is usually where a damp course is defective. This can be identified by a white tidemark on the walls. It’s a massive problem so let’s get the facts. It is impossible to avoid some condensation in properties but you can minimise the risk by ensuring you have proper heating and most importantly of all - good ventilation. It is estimated that four people living in a three bedroom property would create 112 pints of moisture a week from just breathing, cooking, showering and boiling the kettle. But if you constantly have to wipe condensation off your windows and have a dehumidifier running for lengthy periods of time then you need to consider installing better ventilation in every part of the property. (see link below) In such cases you need to call in the experts for a home survey but there are a few things you can do in the meantime to ease the situation The ideal temperature at home should range between 19-22 degrees Celsius in living rooms, kitchen and bathroom, and 16-20 degrees Celsius in bedrooms. Good insulation is also advised as it creates warmer walls and ceilings, and inhibits mould growth by preventing condensation from forming on them. Airtight windows and buildings require more active ventilation. You can also ventilate your home without making draughts to reduce moisture. Try keeping a small window ajar when someone is in the room or if your windows have been recently renewed open the trickle ventilators provided. Ventilate kitchens and bathrooms when in use by opening the windows wider, or better still, use a humidity-controlled electric fan if one is fitted. Close the kitchen and bathroom doors when these rooms are in use, even if your kitchen and bathroom has an extractor fan. This will help prevent moisture reaching other rooms, especially bedrooms, which are often colder and more likely to get condensation. Do not block air-brick vents, ventilate cupboards and wardrobes and avoid putting too many things in cupboards and wardrobes as this stops the air circulating. Do not block permanent ventilators or chimneys by ensuring that you leave a hole about two bricks in size and fit a louvered grille over it. Reducing draughts in rooms where there is condensation or mould is also a NO. Householders are also recommended to keep washing, boiling kettles and any other items that form steam or moisture to be kept to a minimum, but if all efforts fail and mould begins to form then you will probably need a fungicidal wash to get rid of the problem. As already discussed – the major factor is good ventilation. There are many products available on line to consider. Just click the link for an example. Click here to visit Amazon    
    Apr 30, 2018 628
  • 27 Apr 2018
    Whether it is at home, in workplaces, leisure facilities or healthcare environments, there can be no doubt that people spend large amounts of their time in buildings.  In the drive towards both sustainability in construction and reducing our carbon footprint, we need to ensure that we build with this in mind.  So, naturally we should be creating buildings that ultimately make people feel healthier and happier.   We already know that a well-designed and insulated building fabric provides the benefits of energy reduction, lower fuel bills and better control of internal temperature, keeping the occupants warm in winter and cool in the summer which all adds to their comfort and wellbeing.  But it’s not just an issue of temperature that impacts our wellbeing; we need to design to control humidity and consider the acoustic and visual comfort of occupants. Well-designed ventilation systems promoting good indoor air quality, coupled with good natural light are essential elements for good health. Of course, the improved health of building occupants is a key consideration since warm, dry homes help to reduce the impact on the NHS by the most vulnerable in our society.  Living in under-heated, cold and draughty homes can pose severe health risks, due to the higher instances of damp and mould, which exacerbates health issues such as asthma, bronchitis, heart and lung disease. A comfortable thermal environment that will meet all these needs and those of all occupants is of course a challenge, particularly when you take into consideration individual preferences and also the vagaries of a building’s thermal environment. High performance PIR insulation has an important role to play in any new build or retrofit project which aims to substantially raise thermal performance standards and improve the building’s internal environment. Good design and workmanship also play their part, as does good detailing. Ultimately, it’s a balancing act of a complex set of interdependent factors – however, the benefits of getting it right are worth it. Sustainable buildings are not just about energy performance, aesthetics and the materials that are used to build them, we must also ensure that the people that use them are comfortable and happy. The design of our built environment has a significant impact on the nation’s health and we need to ensure that we get it right first time in order for everyone to feel better about themselves in the longer term, and to ensure that we do not have to go back and retrofit buildings in the future because we failed to deliver today the highest performing insulation that is practically and economically available. Visit: www.insulationmanufacturers.org.uk
    648 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Whether it is at home, in workplaces, leisure facilities or healthcare environments, there can be no doubt that people spend large amounts of their time in buildings.  In the drive towards both sustainability in construction and reducing our carbon footprint, we need to ensure that we build with this in mind.  So, naturally we should be creating buildings that ultimately make people feel healthier and happier.   We already know that a well-designed and insulated building fabric provides the benefits of energy reduction, lower fuel bills and better control of internal temperature, keeping the occupants warm in winter and cool in the summer which all adds to their comfort and wellbeing.  But it’s not just an issue of temperature that impacts our wellbeing; we need to design to control humidity and consider the acoustic and visual comfort of occupants. Well-designed ventilation systems promoting good indoor air quality, coupled with good natural light are essential elements for good health. Of course, the improved health of building occupants is a key consideration since warm, dry homes help to reduce the impact on the NHS by the most vulnerable in our society.  Living in under-heated, cold and draughty homes can pose severe health risks, due to the higher instances of damp and mould, which exacerbates health issues such as asthma, bronchitis, heart and lung disease. A comfortable thermal environment that will meet all these needs and those of all occupants is of course a challenge, particularly when you take into consideration individual preferences and also the vagaries of a building’s thermal environment. High performance PIR insulation has an important role to play in any new build or retrofit project which aims to substantially raise thermal performance standards and improve the building’s internal environment. Good design and workmanship also play their part, as does good detailing. Ultimately, it’s a balancing act of a complex set of interdependent factors – however, the benefits of getting it right are worth it. Sustainable buildings are not just about energy performance, aesthetics and the materials that are used to build them, we must also ensure that the people that use them are comfortable and happy. The design of our built environment has a significant impact on the nation’s health and we need to ensure that we get it right first time in order for everyone to feel better about themselves in the longer term, and to ensure that we do not have to go back and retrofit buildings in the future because we failed to deliver today the highest performing insulation that is practically and economically available. Visit: www.insulationmanufacturers.org.uk
    Apr 27, 2018 648
  • 24 Apr 2018
    There’s no way one can deny the importance and benefits of using technology in modern life. From keeping in touch with friends living abroad, to managing your career, using computer applications and web technology can be beneficial for nearly everything. Software applications are used by almost every industry nowadays, including healthcare, retail and human resource management. In industries where manual calculation and labour is considered to be crucial, software and technology have seeped in gradually. One such industry is construction. Whilst construction projects require deployment of manual labour and using specialised devices, using construction software to manage and keep track of things can be advantageous. From engineers to site workers, using construction software will make things easier for everyone involved. Whilst the core work for everyone remains the same and large scale projects may still take months to complete, utilising construction business software can minimise risk factors and simplify complications. Have a look at the benefits of using construction software. Estimating For Construction Estimation is a prerequisite before any construction project commences. However, mistakes in estimation may lead to issues such as cost escalation and a delay in project completion. Using construction industry software minimises these kinds of errors. These applications come with inbuilt tools for making diverse types of calculations relevant to this sector. This proves to be beneficial for all parties involved in such a project eventually. Construction Project Schedule In construction projects, sticking to a schedule is paramount. Contractors need to wrap up various work involved construction in time. Delays can lead to legal issues and cost hikes. One major construction software benefit is built-in scheduling that helps project managers and contractors keep track of progress. This is even more helpful for large construction agencies dealing with multiple construction projects. Some of these applications even come with the option to set reminders for important tasks. Construction Document Management Using construction accounting software helps simplify document management. In the past, storing invoices and bills proved to be tedious and document management was worse in large projects. When you use software for construction, managing documents becomes easier - bills, invoices and contracts can be stored digitally. These electronic documents can be retrieved at any time and unlike paper, cannot get damaged. The complications with important documents getting lost don’t apply here. Construction Inventory Management Construction companies are required to stock frequently-used materials like cement, paint, metal sheets, rods and various accessories for ongoing and upcoming projects. Mismanagement and mishandling of stocked products is not uncommon and can lead to financial loss and disputes. However, through using accounting software for construction industry, inventory management errors can be reduced.  From purchasing to being put in storage, to being used in construction projects, keeping track of the inventory is much easier. Construction Communication With feature rich applications, communication between various departments in a construction company is improved. Current construction management software has features to enable the instant sharing of information and group editing - information is updated in real time and everyone involved gets updates instantly. This speeds up workflow and boosts productivity and communication between teams. Construction Data Protection   In construction projects, safeguarding project data is of the utmost importance. Through using suitable construction industry accounting software, data safety issues are minimised. You can password protect vital project data and some applications let you store this data in the cloud. This ensures information is stored safely, with local network or hardware failure not leading to issues. Construction Workforce Tracking In any construction project, workers and employees have to be deployed and hired. It’s important for management to keep track of the workforce to ensure things are executed properly and within the stipulated time. This becomes easier when construction business software is used. With this, you can more easily review the daily progress and judge whether employees are performing as they should.   The benefits of using construction industry software are too advantageous to overlook. However, selecting the right software for your construction company is also key. You have to consider what your construction company really needs when buying such software. We would recommend EasyBuild UK, a leading construction project management company, whose construction software addresses all of the operational needs of construction businesses. Visit: http://www.easybuilduk.com  
    746 Posted by Talk. Build
  • There’s no way one can deny the importance and benefits of using technology in modern life. From keeping in touch with friends living abroad, to managing your career, using computer applications and web technology can be beneficial for nearly everything. Software applications are used by almost every industry nowadays, including healthcare, retail and human resource management. In industries where manual calculation and labour is considered to be crucial, software and technology have seeped in gradually. One such industry is construction. Whilst construction projects require deployment of manual labour and using specialised devices, using construction software to manage and keep track of things can be advantageous. From engineers to site workers, using construction software will make things easier for everyone involved. Whilst the core work for everyone remains the same and large scale projects may still take months to complete, utilising construction business software can minimise risk factors and simplify complications. Have a look at the benefits of using construction software. Estimating For Construction Estimation is a prerequisite before any construction project commences. However, mistakes in estimation may lead to issues such as cost escalation and a delay in project completion. Using construction industry software minimises these kinds of errors. These applications come with inbuilt tools for making diverse types of calculations relevant to this sector. This proves to be beneficial for all parties involved in such a project eventually. Construction Project Schedule In construction projects, sticking to a schedule is paramount. Contractors need to wrap up various work involved construction in time. Delays can lead to legal issues and cost hikes. One major construction software benefit is built-in scheduling that helps project managers and contractors keep track of progress. This is even more helpful for large construction agencies dealing with multiple construction projects. Some of these applications even come with the option to set reminders for important tasks. Construction Document Management Using construction accounting software helps simplify document management. In the past, storing invoices and bills proved to be tedious and document management was worse in large projects. When you use software for construction, managing documents becomes easier - bills, invoices and contracts can be stored digitally. These electronic documents can be retrieved at any time and unlike paper, cannot get damaged. The complications with important documents getting lost don’t apply here. Construction Inventory Management Construction companies are required to stock frequently-used materials like cement, paint, metal sheets, rods and various accessories for ongoing and upcoming projects. Mismanagement and mishandling of stocked products is not uncommon and can lead to financial loss and disputes. However, through using accounting software for construction industry, inventory management errors can be reduced.  From purchasing to being put in storage, to being used in construction projects, keeping track of the inventory is much easier. Construction Communication With feature rich applications, communication between various departments in a construction company is improved. Current construction management software has features to enable the instant sharing of information and group editing - information is updated in real time and everyone involved gets updates instantly. This speeds up workflow and boosts productivity and communication between teams. Construction Data Protection   In construction projects, safeguarding project data is of the utmost importance. Through using suitable construction industry accounting software, data safety issues are minimised. You can password protect vital project data and some applications let you store this data in the cloud. This ensures information is stored safely, with local network or hardware failure not leading to issues. Construction Workforce Tracking In any construction project, workers and employees have to be deployed and hired. It’s important for management to keep track of the workforce to ensure things are executed properly and within the stipulated time. This becomes easier when construction business software is used. With this, you can more easily review the daily progress and judge whether employees are performing as they should.   The benefits of using construction industry software are too advantageous to overlook. However, selecting the right software for your construction company is also key. You have to consider what your construction company really needs when buying such software. We would recommend EasyBuild UK, a leading construction project management company, whose construction software addresses all of the operational needs of construction businesses. Visit: http://www.easybuilduk.com  
    Apr 24, 2018 746
  • 18 Apr 2018
    Since its founding in 1988, Baumit’s key driver has been the desire to help create beautiful, energy-efficient and healthy homes. Everybody deserves to live in beautiful, affordable and healthy surroundings.Our four walls provide protection for our families, and these are the qualities that enhance people's lives. Homeowners are becoming more and more energy conscious, and being able to cater to consumer needs is a must for success in any industry. A report from Smart Energy GB found that four in five people who had recently had a smart meter installed had taken steps to reduce their energy use, 45% of which were monitoring their consumption more closely than before. More than 75% of the energy consumption of an average household is spent on heating. Efficient thermal insulation is unavoidable if you want to save money, protect the basic structure of your building and reduce your carbon emissions. EWI, correctly installed, will minimise heating costs during cold weather and prevent excess heating during the warm season, saving energy year round. A thermal renovation can save a household more than 50% of its energy costs. A working knowledge of External Wall Insulation products will prove invaluable when communicating the value of your projects. It isn’t enough to simply create the products needed to facilitate these goals, however. Baumit is dedicated to creating change throughout the industry, informing and educating the next generation of installers and applicators. That’s why Baumit has opened a brand new training academy in Aylesford, Kent, to host a series of installer courses catering to all levels of experience. From March 2018, this purpose-built facility will be open to those within the construction industry, providing vital theoretical and practical experience in a range of EWI systems and practices. Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit, said: “Our installer courses provide a perfect opportunity for installers of all ability and members of the construction industry to gain a valuable working knowledge of External Wall Insulation. The experts at our training academy are fully-equipped to offer a wide-range of theoretical and practical advice to ensure clients come away better-informed of the processes and systems involved in all things EWI.” The training facility and courses were designed to cover aspects which are missing from other courses, supporting installers in learning the solutions to real life scenarios that a purely theoretical understanding would not prepare them for. In focusing on the details, rather than just the basics, applicators will receive an in depth understanding of the benefits of a high quality product, properly installed. Spread over 2 days, the Silver and Gold courses offer participants time to reflect on what they have been taught, allowing them adequate time to raise any questions they might have. Baumit is dedicated to building relationships with course participants, and encourages questions and communication both during and after the course is complete, ensuring that they feel comfortable and confident in their abilities and with the product. Baumit is committed to providing exemplary support to its installers, supporting their future work with upskilling, up-to-date information on legislative changes, and phone support, leading to higher quality installs. By supporting the next generation of installers and applicators, Baumit is ensuring that its commitment to beautiful, healthy and energy-efficient homes is continued – helping to deliver a better future for everyone. Visit our website: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    644 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Since its founding in 1988, Baumit’s key driver has been the desire to help create beautiful, energy-efficient and healthy homes. Everybody deserves to live in beautiful, affordable and healthy surroundings.Our four walls provide protection for our families, and these are the qualities that enhance people's lives. Homeowners are becoming more and more energy conscious, and being able to cater to consumer needs is a must for success in any industry. A report from Smart Energy GB found that four in five people who had recently had a smart meter installed had taken steps to reduce their energy use, 45% of which were monitoring their consumption more closely than before. More than 75% of the energy consumption of an average household is spent on heating. Efficient thermal insulation is unavoidable if you want to save money, protect the basic structure of your building and reduce your carbon emissions. EWI, correctly installed, will minimise heating costs during cold weather and prevent excess heating during the warm season, saving energy year round. A thermal renovation can save a household more than 50% of its energy costs. A working knowledge of External Wall Insulation products will prove invaluable when communicating the value of your projects. It isn’t enough to simply create the products needed to facilitate these goals, however. Baumit is dedicated to creating change throughout the industry, informing and educating the next generation of installers and applicators. That’s why Baumit has opened a brand new training academy in Aylesford, Kent, to host a series of installer courses catering to all levels of experience. From March 2018, this purpose-built facility will be open to those within the construction industry, providing vital theoretical and practical experience in a range of EWI systems and practices. Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit, said: “Our installer courses provide a perfect opportunity for installers of all ability and members of the construction industry to gain a valuable working knowledge of External Wall Insulation. The experts at our training academy are fully-equipped to offer a wide-range of theoretical and practical advice to ensure clients come away better-informed of the processes and systems involved in all things EWI.” The training facility and courses were designed to cover aspects which are missing from other courses, supporting installers in learning the solutions to real life scenarios that a purely theoretical understanding would not prepare them for. In focusing on the details, rather than just the basics, applicators will receive an in depth understanding of the benefits of a high quality product, properly installed. Spread over 2 days, the Silver and Gold courses offer participants time to reflect on what they have been taught, allowing them adequate time to raise any questions they might have. Baumit is dedicated to building relationships with course participants, and encourages questions and communication both during and after the course is complete, ensuring that they feel comfortable and confident in their abilities and with the product. Baumit is committed to providing exemplary support to its installers, supporting their future work with upskilling, up-to-date information on legislative changes, and phone support, leading to higher quality installs. By supporting the next generation of installers and applicators, Baumit is ensuring that its commitment to beautiful, healthy and energy-efficient homes is continued – helping to deliver a better future for everyone. Visit our website: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    Apr 18, 2018 644
  • 12 Apr 2018
    The building boom the government needs to initiate to redress the imbalance between UK housing need and availability should – in theory – create abundant work opportunities for contractors of all construction type. Getting to the front of the queue when the selection process starts for any project, be it site-based or a straightforward job application, requires having more to offer than those bidding for the same position. Staying just one small step ahead of the opposition in terms of professional skills and experience can go a long way to securing that vital contract. Keeping pace Even those with a construction career span as long as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge should refrain from considering themselves beyond learning new tricks of the trade. After all, those who stand still commercially or personally risk being left high and dry by the tides of change. As the 21st century advances, so does the breadth and capability of building products and practices. It’s not a stretch, therefore, to say only those who keep pace with industry trends and standards will remain a competitive force in the marketplace. The UK needs new housing like never before; housing that is sustainable, conforms to unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and is built in the shortest time as possible. Opportunity has never knocked more loudly for those in the construction sector, but only those able to meet the required skill levels shall reap the rewards. Training academies, such as those being set-up by Baumit, will help candidates ‘skill-up’ and meet the construction industry’s current and future demands. At our UK headquarters in Aylesford, Kent Baumit has devised a series of External Wall Insulation courses for installers and applicators. Designed to cater for candidates of all ability, the two-day courses are tailored to suit individual or group needs, offering hands-on, practical learning experience with ‘real-life’ challenges usually encountered in the workplace. We offer three levels of course - bronze, silver and gold – each devised to enhance the professional capabilities of candidates, depending on their current skill level. Those who complete the bronze-to-gold journey will earn an industry qualification in the form of OSCAR Onsite overview and approval, as well as become a Baumit-approved partner and gain access to a host of other benefits. Support As part of our aftercare service, candidates who complete the course will have the ongoing support of Baumit’s technical team. It means whether you’re on-site or in the office, our experts are a reassuring phone call away to offer guidance and advice on all EWI-related matters. Offerings such as this can be the difference between a project being completed on time and to a high standard, or it failing due to issues such as a lack of attention to seemingly minor technical details. With its training academy, Baumit has built a platform for EWI installers to stay ahead of the opposition as the industry gears-up for future challenges and change. Visit:http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    581 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The building boom the government needs to initiate to redress the imbalance between UK housing need and availability should – in theory – create abundant work opportunities for contractors of all construction type. Getting to the front of the queue when the selection process starts for any project, be it site-based or a straightforward job application, requires having more to offer than those bidding for the same position. Staying just one small step ahead of the opposition in terms of professional skills and experience can go a long way to securing that vital contract. Keeping pace Even those with a construction career span as long as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge should refrain from considering themselves beyond learning new tricks of the trade. After all, those who stand still commercially or personally risk being left high and dry by the tides of change. As the 21st century advances, so does the breadth and capability of building products and practices. It’s not a stretch, therefore, to say only those who keep pace with industry trends and standards will remain a competitive force in the marketplace. The UK needs new housing like never before; housing that is sustainable, conforms to unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and is built in the shortest time as possible. Opportunity has never knocked more loudly for those in the construction sector, but only those able to meet the required skill levels shall reap the rewards. Training academies, such as those being set-up by Baumit, will help candidates ‘skill-up’ and meet the construction industry’s current and future demands. At our UK headquarters in Aylesford, Kent Baumit has devised a series of External Wall Insulation courses for installers and applicators. Designed to cater for candidates of all ability, the two-day courses are tailored to suit individual or group needs, offering hands-on, practical learning experience with ‘real-life’ challenges usually encountered in the workplace. We offer three levels of course - bronze, silver and gold – each devised to enhance the professional capabilities of candidates, depending on their current skill level. Those who complete the bronze-to-gold journey will earn an industry qualification in the form of OSCAR Onsite overview and approval, as well as become a Baumit-approved partner and gain access to a host of other benefits. Support As part of our aftercare service, candidates who complete the course will have the ongoing support of Baumit’s technical team. It means whether you’re on-site or in the office, our experts are a reassuring phone call away to offer guidance and advice on all EWI-related matters. Offerings such as this can be the difference between a project being completed on time and to a high standard, or it failing due to issues such as a lack of attention to seemingly minor technical details. With its training academy, Baumit has built a platform for EWI installers to stay ahead of the opposition as the industry gears-up for future challenges and change. Visit:http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    Apr 12, 2018 581
  • 06 Apr 2018
    They have been around for more than 140 years and operate on a tried and tested principle - being set off by heat.  Notwithstanding that, sprinklers have been refined and improved over the decades utilising new materials and scientific design to produce droplets that most effectively extinguish the fire. Despite this, there remains a lack of understanding and some surprising misconceptions which tragically prevent them from being installed. The Business Sprinkler Alliance dispels and debunks the myths, and demonstrates why automatic fire sprinklers can stop a fire in its tracks, providing round-the-clock, cost-effective protection for buildings. Myth #1: A fire detection system provides enough protection. Fire detection systems save lives by providing a warning of fire, but can do nothing to control or extinguish a growing fire. Myth #2: Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be more extensive than fire damage. Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be far less severe than the damage caused by water from firefighters’ hoses. Modern sprinklers operate very quickly to release 45 – 200 litres of water per minute, compared to 700 – 4000 litres per minute discharged by fire service hoses and jets. Myth #3: When one sprinkler goes off, won’t they all go off? All sprinklers going off at once might well have been perpetuated by Hollywood for comic and dramatic effect but only the sprinkler heads in the immediate vicinity of a fire will operate because each sprinkler head is individually activated by heat. Research carried out over 20 years shows that 80% of fires are controlled or extinguished by the operation of fewer than six sprinkler heads. Myth #4: Fire sprinklers are expensive to maintain. Sprinkler systems must be inspected, tested, and maintained to ensure a high degree of reliability. However, sprinkler systems only need two maintenance visits a year by a contractor. This costs around £500 a year for larger systems. Small systems require only an annual visit and this will cost between £75 and £100. Any misconception surrounding the costs of sprinkler systems can be dispelled by looking at the true costs of a building over the lifespan of that building. The low whole-life costs of a fire sprinkler system make investment attractive. Fire sprinkler systems will last the lifetime of a building without major replacement or refurbishment. The industry claims a service life of around 40 years, but it is well known that there are many sprinkler systems from the 1930s which are still operational. Automatic fire sprinkler systems are critical to physical resilience and business continuity. When a fire starts in a building fitted with a fully functioning sprinkler system it has a high probability of being contained from the outset, controlling or extinguishing the fire in advance of fire and rescue services’ arrival. In the vast majority of cases the impacted business is fully functioning within hours. They save lives, reduce the threat to firefighters, reduce the burden on the fire service, save businesses, save jobs and protect the environment.  Visit the www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7g7ND-dnZs&feature=youtu.be    
    601 Posted by Talk. Build
  • They have been around for more than 140 years and operate on a tried and tested principle - being set off by heat.  Notwithstanding that, sprinklers have been refined and improved over the decades utilising new materials and scientific design to produce droplets that most effectively extinguish the fire. Despite this, there remains a lack of understanding and some surprising misconceptions which tragically prevent them from being installed. The Business Sprinkler Alliance dispels and debunks the myths, and demonstrates why automatic fire sprinklers can stop a fire in its tracks, providing round-the-clock, cost-effective protection for buildings. Myth #1: A fire detection system provides enough protection. Fire detection systems save lives by providing a warning of fire, but can do nothing to control or extinguish a growing fire. Myth #2: Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be more extensive than fire damage. Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be far less severe than the damage caused by water from firefighters’ hoses. Modern sprinklers operate very quickly to release 45 – 200 litres of water per minute, compared to 700 – 4000 litres per minute discharged by fire service hoses and jets. Myth #3: When one sprinkler goes off, won’t they all go off? All sprinklers going off at once might well have been perpetuated by Hollywood for comic and dramatic effect but only the sprinkler heads in the immediate vicinity of a fire will operate because each sprinkler head is individually activated by heat. Research carried out over 20 years shows that 80% of fires are controlled or extinguished by the operation of fewer than six sprinkler heads. Myth #4: Fire sprinklers are expensive to maintain. Sprinkler systems must be inspected, tested, and maintained to ensure a high degree of reliability. However, sprinkler systems only need two maintenance visits a year by a contractor. This costs around £500 a year for larger systems. Small systems require only an annual visit and this will cost between £75 and £100. Any misconception surrounding the costs of sprinkler systems can be dispelled by looking at the true costs of a building over the lifespan of that building. The low whole-life costs of a fire sprinkler system make investment attractive. Fire sprinkler systems will last the lifetime of a building without major replacement or refurbishment. The industry claims a service life of around 40 years, but it is well known that there are many sprinkler systems from the 1930s which are still operational. Automatic fire sprinkler systems are critical to physical resilience and business continuity. When a fire starts in a building fitted with a fully functioning sprinkler system it has a high probability of being contained from the outset, controlling or extinguishing the fire in advance of fire and rescue services’ arrival. In the vast majority of cases the impacted business is fully functioning within hours. They save lives, reduce the threat to firefighters, reduce the burden on the fire service, save businesses, save jobs and protect the environment.  Visit the www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7g7ND-dnZs&feature=youtu.be    
    Apr 06, 2018 601
  • 05 Apr 2018
    The areas in which self-compacting concrete is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. Self-compacting concrete was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully-compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. Since 2000, Sika has been among companies leading the development of self-compacting concrete in the UK. Its growth in this country is predominately due to its use in ground floor housing slabs. Before its introduction, conventional concrete made this type of application machine and labour intensive. For instance, concrete poured in the traditional way and is tacky and stiff in consistency, would normally require up to six installers to screed an area. This method also requires the use of mechanical vibration to rid the freshly-poured concrete of entrapped air to ensure its suitability and long-term performance. And that’s not all. Upon installation, concrete applied the ‘old-fashioned way’ needs to be power-floated to give the slab a smooth, polished finish. Concreting an area the same size using self-compacting material requires at least half the manpower to complete in half the time, with its speed and ease of placement being key to its improved management and distribution. Easy placement Laying self-compacting concrete is like laying liquid as opposed to treacle - it’s that easy. It also eliminates the need for power-floating as it naturally provides a polished, high-quality finish. The secret of this substance’s success can be found in admixtures such as Sika ViscoFlow®, which brings much-needed flexibility to the most challenging concreting application. Infused with graded aggregate, the high-performance admixture extends the concrete’s plasticity, with its two-hour retention property allowing time for site transportation and placement. Sika ViscoFlow® technology also ensures target consistency in a concrete mix in high or low temperature climates in new-build and refurbishment projects. Preparation is vital to successful self-compacting concrete placement. Admixture/aggregate ratios should be tailored to the precise needs of the project’s size and scope. A slip membrane should also be used in conjunction with all self-compacting applications. Again, this method negates the need for mechanical vibration processes, therefore increasing on-site health and safety and resulting in a time and cost-effective installation with a material that is stronger and more durable than traditional placement techniques. Fibres Another important development in self-compacting concrete is the availability of fibres which new NHBC regulations state should be incorporated within certain applications. From January 2018, the authority decreed steel, micro or macro fibres or steel mesh should be used - where appropriate - as reinforcement to concrete toppings above suspended beam and block floors. Sika is already ahead of the curve on that score by providing a range of fibres which allow concrete mix designs to meet NHBC specifications. In terms of the future, it’s my wish to see self-compacting concrete be used more architecturally in building columns and facias. Its flexibility certainly allows for a more design-led approach to its application, which could be enhanced by the availability of pigmented self-compacting solutions. Compatibility with watertight admixtures would also advance self-compacting concrete’s use whilst eliminating the risk of lack of compaction – one of the biggest threats to its long-term performance. Whatever tomorrow holds, the one thing we can be sure of today is self-compacting concrete’s status as an easy-to-apply, durable alternative to conventional concrete, with its superb flexibility being without detriment to its proven, long-term strength. By Peter Cowan, Regional Sales Manager at Sika Concrete & Waterproofing Visit: www.sika.co.uk  
    647 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The areas in which self-compacting concrete is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. Self-compacting concrete was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully-compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. Since 2000, Sika has been among companies leading the development of self-compacting concrete in the UK. Its growth in this country is predominately due to its use in ground floor housing slabs. Before its introduction, conventional concrete made this type of application machine and labour intensive. For instance, concrete poured in the traditional way and is tacky and stiff in consistency, would normally require up to six installers to screed an area. This method also requires the use of mechanical vibration to rid the freshly-poured concrete of entrapped air to ensure its suitability and long-term performance. And that’s not all. Upon installation, concrete applied the ‘old-fashioned way’ needs to be power-floated to give the slab a smooth, polished finish. Concreting an area the same size using self-compacting material requires at least half the manpower to complete in half the time, with its speed and ease of placement being key to its improved management and distribution. Easy placement Laying self-compacting concrete is like laying liquid as opposed to treacle - it’s that easy. It also eliminates the need for power-floating as it naturally provides a polished, high-quality finish. The secret of this substance’s success can be found in admixtures such as Sika ViscoFlow®, which brings much-needed flexibility to the most challenging concreting application. Infused with graded aggregate, the high-performance admixture extends the concrete’s plasticity, with its two-hour retention property allowing time for site transportation and placement. Sika ViscoFlow® technology also ensures target consistency in a concrete mix in high or low temperature climates in new-build and refurbishment projects. Preparation is vital to successful self-compacting concrete placement. Admixture/aggregate ratios should be tailored to the precise needs of the project’s size and scope. A slip membrane should also be used in conjunction with all self-compacting applications. Again, this method negates the need for mechanical vibration processes, therefore increasing on-site health and safety and resulting in a time and cost-effective installation with a material that is stronger and more durable than traditional placement techniques. Fibres Another important development in self-compacting concrete is the availability of fibres which new NHBC regulations state should be incorporated within certain applications. From January 2018, the authority decreed steel, micro or macro fibres or steel mesh should be used - where appropriate - as reinforcement to concrete toppings above suspended beam and block floors. Sika is already ahead of the curve on that score by providing a range of fibres which allow concrete mix designs to meet NHBC specifications. In terms of the future, it’s my wish to see self-compacting concrete be used more architecturally in building columns and facias. Its flexibility certainly allows for a more design-led approach to its application, which could be enhanced by the availability of pigmented self-compacting solutions. Compatibility with watertight admixtures would also advance self-compacting concrete’s use whilst eliminating the risk of lack of compaction – one of the biggest threats to its long-term performance. Whatever tomorrow holds, the one thing we can be sure of today is self-compacting concrete’s status as an easy-to-apply, durable alternative to conventional concrete, with its superb flexibility being without detriment to its proven, long-term strength. By Peter Cowan, Regional Sales Manager at Sika Concrete & Waterproofing Visit: www.sika.co.uk  
    Apr 05, 2018 647
  • 29 Mar 2018
    With Brexit negotiations only at the ‘beginning of the beginning’ stage according to news reports, the UK’s EU departure is having an effect on the construction industry. A report published by the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) found that UK businesses are already finding it harder to recruit skilled staff, particularly in the engineering sector, as a result of net migration falls in the wake of Brexit. This once again throws into sharp focus a need to address the current construction skills shortage among the UK workforce. Shortfall According to recent reports, the UK construction industry will need approximately 400,000 new workers every year until 2021 to meet the demand for new building projects. In the roofing industry some experts are predicting that we will have a shortfall of some 100,000 skilled crafts people over that period and every trade sector is reporting a similar story. More skilled hands are required to solve the country’s current construction shortfall, but are fears of a post-Brexit Britain sending engineers of all stripes scurrying overseas? In November 2017, an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report found net migration to the UK had plummeted by more than 100,000 - the largest decline since records began - in the year following the EU referendum. A figure made all the more significant by the revelation that 8% of the UK’s construction workers, which equates to 176,500 people, are EU nationals. Little wonder, then, more than half of Britain’s construction workers are reportedly ‘concerned’ by the prospect of a skills shortage. Justifiably, perhaps, when it’s anticipated output from the UK construction market will flourish throughout 2018. Solution With ‘divorce’ from Europe looming, there’s little doubt the UK cannot solely rely on importing engineering skills - as valuable as they are - to bolster its building trade. So where is hope on the horizon? NCTS is working towards a solution to help educate young people to the many benefits of a career in one of construction’s most important strands – roofing. Committed to providing an outstanding level of training across all the sector’s disciplines, NCTS is working with the CITB, trade federations and manufacturers to encourage more young people to take up apprenticeships. The company is also looking at ways of attracting more funding to allow this to happen at a national level. Perception Inspiring the next generation to take-up a career in construction, particularly roofing, is crucial to filling the current skills gap long-term. It also requires changing people’s perception of the industry. For instance, The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) recently asked a group of 14 to 19-year-olds which careers interested them - construction scored a tiny 4.2 out of 10. According to the survey, young people claimed that construction means ‘being outdoors and getting dirty’.’ It appears the workforce of tomorrow - more than 50% at least - view construction as a non-academic profession that clearly doesn’t fit with their idea of what a fulfilling, exciting, well-paid, career should look like. It is why NCTS offers a variety of professional training courses designed to fit with an array of needs and skill levels to educate candidates and create an environment for them to thrive - rather than simply survive - in the roofing sector. Our expert assessors carry out site visits, delivering detailed reports on the skills and industry knowledge on show to help improve workplace performance. An NCTS course can lead to an NVQ level 2 qualification, opening-up a world of opportunity for young roofers, as it enables them to work on any site in the UK. Opportunity’s knocking With adversity, comes opportunity. The current skills shortage means there has never been a better time to consider a career in construction - the industry needs you. With more new houses and infrastructure needed than ever before, a reported two-thirds of surveyors admit a lack of skilled workers is threatening to prevent that requirement being fulfilled. If the question, ‘why should I take-up a career in roofing or other construction sectors?’ arises, the NCTS reply would be simple: ‘why would you not want to?’ The industry has so much to offer. Today’s youngsters have it in their hands to shape the world we inherit tomorrow - their knowledge and skills are paramount to progress. A job in construction can be very-well paid, but its value to the living and working environment is priceless. At NCTS, we believe by reconstructing people’s view of roofing, engineering and the like as a desirable career choice, the necessary education and training we provide will go some way to cementing the industry skills gap – the most urgent of all UK building projects. By Philip Fergusson, Managing Director of NCTS, training specialists for the roofing industry. Vist: http://www.ncts.org.uk/
    782 Posted by Talk. Build
  • With Brexit negotiations only at the ‘beginning of the beginning’ stage according to news reports, the UK’s EU departure is having an effect on the construction industry. A report published by the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) found that UK businesses are already finding it harder to recruit skilled staff, particularly in the engineering sector, as a result of net migration falls in the wake of Brexit. This once again throws into sharp focus a need to address the current construction skills shortage among the UK workforce. Shortfall According to recent reports, the UK construction industry will need approximately 400,000 new workers every year until 2021 to meet the demand for new building projects. In the roofing industry some experts are predicting that we will have a shortfall of some 100,000 skilled crafts people over that period and every trade sector is reporting a similar story. More skilled hands are required to solve the country’s current construction shortfall, but are fears of a post-Brexit Britain sending engineers of all stripes scurrying overseas? In November 2017, an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report found net migration to the UK had plummeted by more than 100,000 - the largest decline since records began - in the year following the EU referendum. A figure made all the more significant by the revelation that 8% of the UK’s construction workers, which equates to 176,500 people, are EU nationals. Little wonder, then, more than half of Britain’s construction workers are reportedly ‘concerned’ by the prospect of a skills shortage. Justifiably, perhaps, when it’s anticipated output from the UK construction market will flourish throughout 2018. Solution With ‘divorce’ from Europe looming, there’s little doubt the UK cannot solely rely on importing engineering skills - as valuable as they are - to bolster its building trade. So where is hope on the horizon? NCTS is working towards a solution to help educate young people to the many benefits of a career in one of construction’s most important strands – roofing. Committed to providing an outstanding level of training across all the sector’s disciplines, NCTS is working with the CITB, trade federations and manufacturers to encourage more young people to take up apprenticeships. The company is also looking at ways of attracting more funding to allow this to happen at a national level. Perception Inspiring the next generation to take-up a career in construction, particularly roofing, is crucial to filling the current skills gap long-term. It also requires changing people’s perception of the industry. For instance, The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) recently asked a group of 14 to 19-year-olds which careers interested them - construction scored a tiny 4.2 out of 10. According to the survey, young people claimed that construction means ‘being outdoors and getting dirty’.’ It appears the workforce of tomorrow - more than 50% at least - view construction as a non-academic profession that clearly doesn’t fit with their idea of what a fulfilling, exciting, well-paid, career should look like. It is why NCTS offers a variety of professional training courses designed to fit with an array of needs and skill levels to educate candidates and create an environment for them to thrive - rather than simply survive - in the roofing sector. Our expert assessors carry out site visits, delivering detailed reports on the skills and industry knowledge on show to help improve workplace performance. An NCTS course can lead to an NVQ level 2 qualification, opening-up a world of opportunity for young roofers, as it enables them to work on any site in the UK. Opportunity’s knocking With adversity, comes opportunity. The current skills shortage means there has never been a better time to consider a career in construction - the industry needs you. With more new houses and infrastructure needed than ever before, a reported two-thirds of surveyors admit a lack of skilled workers is threatening to prevent that requirement being fulfilled. If the question, ‘why should I take-up a career in roofing or other construction sectors?’ arises, the NCTS reply would be simple: ‘why would you not want to?’ The industry has so much to offer. Today’s youngsters have it in their hands to shape the world we inherit tomorrow - their knowledge and skills are paramount to progress. A job in construction can be very-well paid, but its value to the living and working environment is priceless. At NCTS, we believe by reconstructing people’s view of roofing, engineering and the like as a desirable career choice, the necessary education and training we provide will go some way to cementing the industry skills gap – the most urgent of all UK building projects. By Philip Fergusson, Managing Director of NCTS, training specialists for the roofing industry. Vist: http://www.ncts.org.uk/
    Mar 29, 2018 782
  • 27 Mar 2018
    The involvement of a large number of professionals makes it really difficult to manage construction projects.  The involvement of several teams such as surveyors, architects and engineers, drafters and 3D modellers, fabricators and labourers etc., makes it really hard for construction managers (general contractors) to monitor and manage onsite activities. The only way to streamline onsite activities is to maintain swift communication between all the construction professionals. General contractors have to be accountable for managing everything from the beginning of the project until a completed building or structure is handed over to the owners. They have to be accountable for arranging raw materials, its swift delivery, and for keeping all the parties informed about the day to day developments. So, if you are a general contractor, here’s how you should manage a project and enhance the productivity of all building professionals. Planning It’s the responsibility of general contractors to plan the project in advance. So, you have to document all the jobs and allot deadlines for them to be completed. It helps in setting the stage for carrying out onsite construction activities swiftly. The accomplishment of construction projects in the right remain the result of detailed planning and sticking to it throughout the project life cycle. Ordering Quality Materials  General contractors also have to arrange the materials for construction. They have to place orders at the right time and ensure that materials are delivered as per their requirements. Using quality Ready Mix Concrete or RMC is the key to constructing durable buildings and structures. Several materials are used for executing residential, commercial and industrial projects, but ready-mix concrete is one of the most important among them and hence, as a general contractor, who is looking after the project, you have to order it from a renowned concrete supplier. Make sure that the concrete supplier is located close to your job site. Since RMC helps in speeding up construction, you should stick to it, rather than thinking about other options. Apart from ordering RMC, you also have to order materials like bricks, binding wires, and steel bars etc., and ensure that they are delivered at the right time. Hiring Skilled Labour Having skilled labour is crucial for speeding up construction. Without skilled workers, you can't construct a building or structure effectively. If in case, you hire unskilled workers they will take double time to accomplish any task when compared to skilled workers. So, you have to stay in touch with relevant industry professionals who can help you in hiring experienced construction workers. Maintaining Safety Ensuring that high safety is maintained in the job sites, is one of the biggest responsibility of general contractors. So, you have to be accountable for providing right training to construction workers and offering quality safety gears to them to eliminate the risk of injuries and accidents. All the workers must be provided with protective gloves, right shoes, safety glasses, hearing protection, and fall protection equipment.  Cost & Time Management General contractors have to keep the track of the expenses involved in construction from time to time, to ensure that the project is not exceeding the budget. Managing the cost is one of the most important responsibilities of general contractors. Therefore, you have to consider all sorts of expenses such as pre-construction expenses (which include the money involved in design development) labour cost, and cost of the materials. In addition to that, the cost involved in rework should also be taken into account. Similarly, they also have to monitor the time involved in carrying out each activity, to ensure that the project is progressing as per the plan. And if in case, you are behind the schedule, then you have to speed up onsite construction activities to finish the project within the deadlines. Visit: http://rmsconcrete.co.uk/
    807 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The involvement of a large number of professionals makes it really difficult to manage construction projects.  The involvement of several teams such as surveyors, architects and engineers, drafters and 3D modellers, fabricators and labourers etc., makes it really hard for construction managers (general contractors) to monitor and manage onsite activities. The only way to streamline onsite activities is to maintain swift communication between all the construction professionals. General contractors have to be accountable for managing everything from the beginning of the project until a completed building or structure is handed over to the owners. They have to be accountable for arranging raw materials, its swift delivery, and for keeping all the parties informed about the day to day developments. So, if you are a general contractor, here’s how you should manage a project and enhance the productivity of all building professionals. Planning It’s the responsibility of general contractors to plan the project in advance. So, you have to document all the jobs and allot deadlines for them to be completed. It helps in setting the stage for carrying out onsite construction activities swiftly. The accomplishment of construction projects in the right remain the result of detailed planning and sticking to it throughout the project life cycle. Ordering Quality Materials  General contractors also have to arrange the materials for construction. They have to place orders at the right time and ensure that materials are delivered as per their requirements. Using quality Ready Mix Concrete or RMC is the key to constructing durable buildings and structures. Several materials are used for executing residential, commercial and industrial projects, but ready-mix concrete is one of the most important among them and hence, as a general contractor, who is looking after the project, you have to order it from a renowned concrete supplier. Make sure that the concrete supplier is located close to your job site. Since RMC helps in speeding up construction, you should stick to it, rather than thinking about other options. Apart from ordering RMC, you also have to order materials like bricks, binding wires, and steel bars etc., and ensure that they are delivered at the right time. Hiring Skilled Labour Having skilled labour is crucial for speeding up construction. Without skilled workers, you can't construct a building or structure effectively. If in case, you hire unskilled workers they will take double time to accomplish any task when compared to skilled workers. So, you have to stay in touch with relevant industry professionals who can help you in hiring experienced construction workers. Maintaining Safety Ensuring that high safety is maintained in the job sites, is one of the biggest responsibility of general contractors. So, you have to be accountable for providing right training to construction workers and offering quality safety gears to them to eliminate the risk of injuries and accidents. All the workers must be provided with protective gloves, right shoes, safety glasses, hearing protection, and fall protection equipment.  Cost & Time Management General contractors have to keep the track of the expenses involved in construction from time to time, to ensure that the project is not exceeding the budget. Managing the cost is one of the most important responsibilities of general contractors. Therefore, you have to consider all sorts of expenses such as pre-construction expenses (which include the money involved in design development) labour cost, and cost of the materials. In addition to that, the cost involved in rework should also be taken into account. Similarly, they also have to monitor the time involved in carrying out each activity, to ensure that the project is progressing as per the plan. And if in case, you are behind the schedule, then you have to speed up onsite construction activities to finish the project within the deadlines. Visit: http://rmsconcrete.co.uk/
    Mar 27, 2018 807
  • 26 Mar 2018
    You can find a variety of wastes on the construction sites. For categorization, there are basically four types of garbage writes Krysta Jackson. Excavated Garbage- This includes sand, soil, rock, gravel, asphalt, and many more. Demolition Waste Material- This includes metal, concrete, asbestos, roofing sheets, wood, brick etc. Construction Waste- It includes plastics, cardboard, metals, concrete, ceramic tiles and many more. Mixed Garbage - Organic wastes are included here.  It is believed that most part of the waste can be recycled and used for various purposes. These are non-toxic stuff. This makes the construction garbage useful as they can save a huge amount of money too. The authorities must pay proper attention to these. It is important to make tiny efforts to bring about significant changes in the environment and the lifestyle.  In case, you want to get rid of the skip providing services, then there are many such companies online that can help you at the reasonable cost. Contact them today to know better about it.  Some projects where the construction waste can be reused are as follows.   Use The Construction Waste For New Building You can make use of the construction site garbage that generates from the old structures . Well, such a thing happens naturally too. For instance, when the renovation is done, the walls are not demolished. During such a process, you can reuse the stuff by decorating or moving the structures by yourself. Therefore, this also comes under reusing the materials.   Measure Before Ordering The Construction Resources  In order to avoid wastage, calculate the quantity of the stuff that is required in the entire process. This is certainly the best way to prevent the wastage of money and resources. In addition to this, make it sure to avoid the use of the hazardous or toxic material. This will make the recycling process flexible. Getting the products in the standard dimensions will also be beneficial for the construction. The cutting procedure leads to wastage. If the resource will be of standard size then there will be less cutting and therefore, the reduced amount of wastage will be produced. l  Where Is The Nearest Local Recycling Service Centre? Before the start of the work, make it sure that the nearest recycling centre is known to you. You do not want to spend your precious time and money on transporting the waste to the recycling centre which is far from the site. That is why you must know about the one which is nearest to the point. l  Disposal Must Be Last Option This process must be started when there is no other option left for treating the garbage. With the help of an expert contractor, the entire procedure must be completed professionally. For instance, plasterboard is considered to be a toxic element for the landfill. Just like this substance, there are others too which must not be reused. So, it is better to treat them first before you dispose of them. l  Deconstruction Is Better Than Demolition There are certain firms that easily separate the reusable substances from the garbage. This can be used in buildings, houses etc with ease. The best part is, doing so the customers will be able to save tax. You certainly do not want to let go such an opportunity, do you? There is one more alternative to use the recyclable substances. You can always make money by organizing a front yard sale. Make money by selling resources which are in perfect condition like grates, radiators, piping, fittings and appliances   Take Time To Calculate The Budget Sticking to the budget is an important procedure in the construction project. Recycling the construction products help in many ways. They are mentioned below. 1. They help in making the planet clean and green. 2. They provide profit to the customers. 3. The customers get better prices here When you will invest in shopping for fewer products than the usual then you can see for yourself how valuable recycling is. Therefore, make use of recycling of the construction garbage and set an example for other firms too. When the management of waste is done responsibly, it becomes an essential feature of sustainable structures. Here, eliminating, minimizing and reusing the garbage becomes an important factor in the construction management. Visit: https://www.rmsskips.com/    
    787 Posted by Talk. Build
  • You can find a variety of wastes on the construction sites. For categorization, there are basically four types of garbage writes Krysta Jackson. Excavated Garbage- This includes sand, soil, rock, gravel, asphalt, and many more. Demolition Waste Material- This includes metal, concrete, asbestos, roofing sheets, wood, brick etc. Construction Waste- It includes plastics, cardboard, metals, concrete, ceramic tiles and many more. Mixed Garbage - Organic wastes are included here.  It is believed that most part of the waste can be recycled and used for various purposes. These are non-toxic stuff. This makes the construction garbage useful as they can save a huge amount of money too. The authorities must pay proper attention to these. It is important to make tiny efforts to bring about significant changes in the environment and the lifestyle.  In case, you want to get rid of the skip providing services, then there are many such companies online that can help you at the reasonable cost. Contact them today to know better about it.  Some projects where the construction waste can be reused are as follows.   Use The Construction Waste For New Building You can make use of the construction site garbage that generates from the old structures . Well, such a thing happens naturally too. For instance, when the renovation is done, the walls are not demolished. During such a process, you can reuse the stuff by decorating or moving the structures by yourself. Therefore, this also comes under reusing the materials.   Measure Before Ordering The Construction Resources  In order to avoid wastage, calculate the quantity of the stuff that is required in the entire process. This is certainly the best way to prevent the wastage of money and resources. In addition to this, make it sure to avoid the use of the hazardous or toxic material. This will make the recycling process flexible. Getting the products in the standard dimensions will also be beneficial for the construction. The cutting procedure leads to wastage. If the resource will be of standard size then there will be less cutting and therefore, the reduced amount of wastage will be produced. l  Where Is The Nearest Local Recycling Service Centre? Before the start of the work, make it sure that the nearest recycling centre is known to you. You do not want to spend your precious time and money on transporting the waste to the recycling centre which is far from the site. That is why you must know about the one which is nearest to the point. l  Disposal Must Be Last Option This process must be started when there is no other option left for treating the garbage. With the help of an expert contractor, the entire procedure must be completed professionally. For instance, plasterboard is considered to be a toxic element for the landfill. Just like this substance, there are others too which must not be reused. So, it is better to treat them first before you dispose of them. l  Deconstruction Is Better Than Demolition There are certain firms that easily separate the reusable substances from the garbage. This can be used in buildings, houses etc with ease. The best part is, doing so the customers will be able to save tax. You certainly do not want to let go such an opportunity, do you? There is one more alternative to use the recyclable substances. You can always make money by organizing a front yard sale. Make money by selling resources which are in perfect condition like grates, radiators, piping, fittings and appliances   Take Time To Calculate The Budget Sticking to the budget is an important procedure in the construction project. Recycling the construction products help in many ways. They are mentioned below. 1. They help in making the planet clean and green. 2. They provide profit to the customers. 3. The customers get better prices here When you will invest in shopping for fewer products than the usual then you can see for yourself how valuable recycling is. Therefore, make use of recycling of the construction garbage and set an example for other firms too. When the management of waste is done responsibly, it becomes an essential feature of sustainable structures. Here, eliminating, minimizing and reusing the garbage becomes an important factor in the construction management. Visit: https://www.rmsskips.com/    
    Mar 26, 2018 787