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Talk. Build 's Entries

  • 31 Oct 2018
    As building owners become more environmentally aware, enquiries to convert existing flat roofsinto green roofs have never been higher. On face value this would seem an easy task but with modern building regulations demanding increased levels of insulation as well as practical challenges such as the heights of parapet walls and other upstand restrictions – the entire process can in reality be a lot more difficult writes Justin Pitman of Proteus Waterproofing. Many buildings, particularly those constructed in the 50s and 60s were never designed to take green roofs. Even assuming that the deck could handle the weight of an extensive sedum roof there are still several major obstacles to overcome, but none are insurmountable. In recent months Proteus has developed a new waterproofing system using its exclusive Cold Melt® membrane with an advanced hybrid insulation that enables a warm roof application to be easily installed on a refurbished deck. A green roof is laid over the top and a combination of the hybrid together with the added insulation properties of the additional soil and plantings, ensures that all current building regulations are met - and here comes the added bonus – the combined insulants are thinner than conventional boards which means that in most cases there is still at least 150 mm of upstand available to safely encapsulate the roof around the borders. Such green roofs are usually applied in urban or built up areas where there is a high risk of disruption or annoyance from odours when the membrane is installed. The advantage of Cold Melt® is that it is odour free and totally seamless making it ideal for a green roof. It is BBA accredited to last for the lifetime of the roof structureand best of all, the membrane itself incorporates recycled material making it one of the greenest on the market. What it does is to make available the opportunity for every building owner to actually consider a green roof application, particularly in the light of recent climate change warnings. Every green roof is of course different and will require its own calculations to ensure the right levels of insulation are used but the answer is no longer – NO – giving every building owner the chance to do their bit for the environment. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDvhkiczqYc 
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • As building owners become more environmentally aware, enquiries to convert existing flat roofsinto green roofs have never been higher. On face value this would seem an easy task but with modern building regulations demanding increased levels of insulation as well as practical challenges such as the heights of parapet walls and other upstand restrictions – the entire process can in reality be a lot more difficult writes Justin Pitman of Proteus Waterproofing. Many buildings, particularly those constructed in the 50s and 60s were never designed to take green roofs. Even assuming that the deck could handle the weight of an extensive sedum roof there are still several major obstacles to overcome, but none are insurmountable. In recent months Proteus has developed a new waterproofing system using its exclusive Cold Melt® membrane with an advanced hybrid insulation that enables a warm roof application to be easily installed on a refurbished deck. A green roof is laid over the top and a combination of the hybrid together with the added insulation properties of the additional soil and plantings, ensures that all current building regulations are met - and here comes the added bonus – the combined insulants are thinner than conventional boards which means that in most cases there is still at least 150 mm of upstand available to safely encapsulate the roof around the borders. Such green roofs are usually applied in urban or built up areas where there is a high risk of disruption or annoyance from odours when the membrane is installed. The advantage of Cold Melt® is that it is odour free and totally seamless making it ideal for a green roof. It is BBA accredited to last for the lifetime of the roof structureand best of all, the membrane itself incorporates recycled material making it one of the greenest on the market. What it does is to make available the opportunity for every building owner to actually consider a green roof application, particularly in the light of recent climate change warnings. Every green roof is of course different and will require its own calculations to ensure the right levels of insulation are used but the answer is no longer – NO – giving every building owner the chance to do their bit for the environment. Visit: www.proteuswaterproofing.co.uk See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDvhkiczqYc 
    Oct 31, 2018 0
  • 27 Sep 2018
    The construction industry faces many challenges. One of these is around delivering projects on time and on budget writes Fiona Irvine LIoR, Technical Services Advisor, Sika UK. Refurbishment projects is one area where accurately predicting cost and time is notoriously difficult as all too often unforeseen factors come into play when a project starts, typically as a result of stripping away part of the building and finding something unexpected. Thermal imaging is one area where technology is helping to overcome this and is now a key part of Sika roof refurbishment offering. Infrared thermography (IRT) and thermal imaging technology detect radiation in the long-infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum (roughly 9,000–14,000 nanometers or 9–14 µm). This produces an image called a thermogram. Since infrared radiation is emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero, thermography makes it possible to see an environment with or without visible illumination. The amount of radiation emitted by an object increases with temperature. Therefore, thermography allows you to see variations in temperature. When viewed through a thermal imaging camera, warm objects stand out well against cooler backgrounds. Thermography has a long history, but its use has increased dramatically with the commercial and industrial applications of the past fifty years. Typical uses include firefighters who use thermography to see through smoke, to find people and to localise the base of a fire. Maintenance technicians use thermography to locate overheating joints and sections of power lines, which are a sign of impending failure. In the construction industry it has been traditionally used to identify heat leaks in faulty thermal insulation and to improve the efficiency of heating and air-conditioning units. Sika has been using thermal imaging technology since 2014. Investment in the technology was driven by the Sales Management Team as a way of adding value to clients. Sika has also invested in me as an individual to become a certified Level 1 thermographer, with training conducted by the world renowned Infrared Training Centre (ITC). As a global leader, working across a variety of market sectors from construction to automotive (see http://bit.ly/2o8Ca6Z) investing in technology and adding value across our supply chain is an essential part of what we do - everyday. We have predominantly used thermal imaging on refurbishment projects to track the extent of damage to the existing roof build up. It provides a much more comprehensive survey report and enables the creation of a more appropriate and suitable specification. It also helps to highlight, in advance, any issues that would have otherwise been unforeseen, helping to reduce risk and avoid any delays or additional costs. For example, we can locate saturated insulation within a roof build up. This can then be backed up with core samples to determine if a roof can be locally stripped to remove damaged insulation or whether a full strip is required. This means we can be more accurate when working with contractors, helping them to accurately price work and identify the most suitable approach, such as removal and replacement of localised roof areas. Thermal imaging provides a wealth of information the naked eye cannot see. It allows us to narrow down the locations where destructive core samples are required. It also provides a visual representation of how the roof is performing thermally. Sika is always striving to be ahead of the competition and utilsiing thermal image is one element of this. However we don’t intend to sit on our laurels. There are several ways to survey a roof and we will continue to look at how technology can aid this. However it shouldn’t stop there. Sika has successfully proven that thermal imaging can add value to roof refurbishment projects and we must now consider what other construction applications it has beyond a roof. For example, how can it be used on flooring, or structural strengthening or concrete repair applications? We will continue to invest in technology that helps us reduce clients risk and deliver projects more effectively. It’s what’s makes Sika that little bit different – it’s what we do every day. Visit:  http://gbr.sika.com/en/group/about-us/sika-everyday.html    
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The construction industry faces many challenges. One of these is around delivering projects on time and on budget writes Fiona Irvine LIoR, Technical Services Advisor, Sika UK. Refurbishment projects is one area where accurately predicting cost and time is notoriously difficult as all too often unforeseen factors come into play when a project starts, typically as a result of stripping away part of the building and finding something unexpected. Thermal imaging is one area where technology is helping to overcome this and is now a key part of Sika roof refurbishment offering. Infrared thermography (IRT) and thermal imaging technology detect radiation in the long-infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum (roughly 9,000–14,000 nanometers or 9–14 µm). This produces an image called a thermogram. Since infrared radiation is emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero, thermography makes it possible to see an environment with or without visible illumination. The amount of radiation emitted by an object increases with temperature. Therefore, thermography allows you to see variations in temperature. When viewed through a thermal imaging camera, warm objects stand out well against cooler backgrounds. Thermography has a long history, but its use has increased dramatically with the commercial and industrial applications of the past fifty years. Typical uses include firefighters who use thermography to see through smoke, to find people and to localise the base of a fire. Maintenance technicians use thermography to locate overheating joints and sections of power lines, which are a sign of impending failure. In the construction industry it has been traditionally used to identify heat leaks in faulty thermal insulation and to improve the efficiency of heating and air-conditioning units. Sika has been using thermal imaging technology since 2014. Investment in the technology was driven by the Sales Management Team as a way of adding value to clients. Sika has also invested in me as an individual to become a certified Level 1 thermographer, with training conducted by the world renowned Infrared Training Centre (ITC). As a global leader, working across a variety of market sectors from construction to automotive (see http://bit.ly/2o8Ca6Z) investing in technology and adding value across our supply chain is an essential part of what we do - everyday. We have predominantly used thermal imaging on refurbishment projects to track the extent of damage to the existing roof build up. It provides a much more comprehensive survey report and enables the creation of a more appropriate and suitable specification. It also helps to highlight, in advance, any issues that would have otherwise been unforeseen, helping to reduce risk and avoid any delays or additional costs. For example, we can locate saturated insulation within a roof build up. This can then be backed up with core samples to determine if a roof can be locally stripped to remove damaged insulation or whether a full strip is required. This means we can be more accurate when working with contractors, helping them to accurately price work and identify the most suitable approach, such as removal and replacement of localised roof areas. Thermal imaging provides a wealth of information the naked eye cannot see. It allows us to narrow down the locations where destructive core samples are required. It also provides a visual representation of how the roof is performing thermally. Sika is always striving to be ahead of the competition and utilsiing thermal image is one element of this. However we don’t intend to sit on our laurels. There are several ways to survey a roof and we will continue to look at how technology can aid this. However it shouldn’t stop there. Sika has successfully proven that thermal imaging can add value to roof refurbishment projects and we must now consider what other construction applications it has beyond a roof. For example, how can it be used on flooring, or structural strengthening or concrete repair applications? We will continue to invest in technology that helps us reduce clients risk and deliver projects more effectively. It’s what’s makes Sika that little bit different – it’s what we do every day. Visit:  http://gbr.sika.com/en/group/about-us/sika-everyday.html    
    Sep 27, 2018 0
  • 20 Sep 2018
    Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to disproportionate costs to the client writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal . When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, for instance, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not-yet weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also invariably put on hold. The accumulative effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers  etc, fulfilling the country’s need for more housing, for example.  Sika-Trocal’s Type S 1.5mm waterproof roof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses specially formulated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. The mechanical-fixing process has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved rapidity is aided by the solvent-welding method devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this method process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding practice, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of burning using this method. Mechanically-fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which help reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises a vapour control layer and insulation, which is held in place by the Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings mean the whole system is mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide such as Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Asda have recently been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new Morrisons store where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in an incredible three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Time is of the essence in business, particularly the roofing business. Delays, however minimal, incurred during commercial new-build or refurbishment projects can lead to disproportionate costs to the client writes Mahroof Hussain, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal . When someone falls behind schedule in a multi-trade works programme, the knock-on effect can be disastrous. If a roof’s waterproofing is held-up, for instance, interior works are also likely to be delayed with the building not-yet weatherproof. This means the installation of floors, walls, electrics, plumbing and the like are also invariably put on hold. The accumulative effect of this type of stalling could set a project back weeks and months, rather than hours or days.  Rapid development Product innovation and the streamlining of the building process itself is vital to helping contractors, developers  etc, fulfilling the country’s need for more housing, for example.  Sika-Trocal’s Type S 1.5mm waterproof roof membrane presents a fine example of a system created specifically for the 21st century roofing market. Suitable for new and refurbishment projects, the Type S system uses specially formulated Sika-Trocal laminated discs to fasten the membrane and the insulation to the substrate. The mechanical-fixing process has been proven to speed-up the roof waterproofing process by up to 30%. The improved rapidity is aided by the solvent-welding method devised to fuse the overlapping membrane rolls; a practice pioneered by Sika in the UK. Employing this method process, rather than the more traditional heat-welding practice, also results in a neater, more attractive waterproof finish. Heat welding requires a temperature of more than 350°C in order to successfully fuse membrane layers. Although there is no naked flame involved, in inexperienced hands a membrane is at risk of burning using this method. Mechanically-fixed, solvent-welded membranes also require less equipment to install. This benefit, along with its time-saving attributes which help reduce on-site working hours, means the Type S system helps cut pollution caused by machine-based emissions. Wind resistant  The Type S system comprises a vapour control layer and insulation, which is held in place by the Sika-Trocal discs. These are spot-welded to the membrane. The fixings mean the whole system is mechanically-fastened to a roof’s structural deck. The added strength this provides makes the Type S membrane an ideal waterproof solution for roofs located in exposed areas where high wind uplift is a common hazard. Speed of installation and reliable, long-term performance are the properties which attract contractors and renowned commercial brands to specify Sika-Trocal’s Type S. Supermarket stores nationwide such as Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Asda have recently been fitted with the system. Its rapid delivery minimises disruption to businesses, hence its specification in September for a new Morrisons store where its installation across a 600m2 roof area was completed in an incredible three days. The system’s speedy installation doesn’t compromise its quality, however. It is why Sika-Trocal’s Type S system is the rapid, long-term solution when it comes to waterproof roofing. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    Sep 20, 2018 0
  • 03 Aug 2018
    With ever-greater pressure being applied to the private and commercial sector purse strings, the need for building projects to be completed on time without minimum fuss becomes more significant writes James Wilkinson. There is little margin for error for contractors working to tighter-than-before deadlines, and that includes ensuring the correct specification of a waterproof, durable flat roof system. But what are the challenges facing architects and contractors when selecting suitable flat roof insulation? And why do such roofs sometimes fail?  As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation should be considered to ensure it remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered systems can help alleviate risk when it comes to flat roofing. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with Gradient, a specialist roof insulation manufacturer which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of tapered solutions for a wide range of roofing applications. Fitting solution Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients fail to engage such companies at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks, for example can result in underperforming U-values and is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from Gradient. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation performance long before they start construction is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Condensing the risk Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Stark assessment For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the deadline. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com About the author: James Wilkinson is Design Team Leader at Gradient  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • With ever-greater pressure being applied to the private and commercial sector purse strings, the need for building projects to be completed on time without minimum fuss becomes more significant writes James Wilkinson. There is little margin for error for contractors working to tighter-than-before deadlines, and that includes ensuring the correct specification of a waterproof, durable flat roof system. But what are the challenges facing architects and contractors when selecting suitable flat roof insulation? And why do such roofs sometimes fail?  As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation should be considered to ensure it remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered systems can help alleviate risk when it comes to flat roofing. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with Gradient, a specialist roof insulation manufacturer which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of tapered solutions for a wide range of roofing applications. Fitting solution Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients fail to engage such companies at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks, for example can result in underperforming U-values and is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from Gradient. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation performance long before they start construction is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Condensing the risk Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Stark assessment For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the deadline. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com About the author: James Wilkinson is Design Team Leader at Gradient  
    Aug 03, 2018 0
  • 16 Jul 2018
    The roofing industry has undergone huge changes over the past decade, writes Shay Casey, Senior Sales Manager at Sika-Trocal. Technology has inspired its growth, with specification and design innovation keeping step with dynamic project visions. BIM modelling, digital presentations and even refurbishment surveys can be carried out using a drone or virtual programmes. Technical advancement has led to a marketplace brimming with new products and systems. Greater choice has led to increased competition, with contractors offering complete roofing and cladding packages – a major change in the specification and application process. The introduction of a wide range of new membranes has seen contractors adapt specifications to ensure the most cost-effective installation; an option not available to architects or clients who no longer have the power to uphold the original specification. This can result in them having to accept products of inferior quality, which isn’t ideal. Today’s roofing contractors need to be more financially aware than ever before, due to the rise of extended payment terms and retentions which have proven a huge burden to buyers and suppliers. Firms throughout the construction have also had to adapt to new ways of self-marketing. In previous years, a simple advert in the local newspaper or Yellow Pages was thought of as a most effective promotional tool. The internet, and more particularly, social media has revolutionised the way we communicate. Rather than rely on repeat business or word of mouth recommendations, a hefty LinkedIn or Twitter presence can spread positive word of a contractor’s service offering in a matter of seconds. Environmental concerns have also led to a welter of roofing industry changes, with the introduction of green and cool roofs, solar panels and further developments in roof lighting. The Green Guide has led to vast improvements in recycling, manufacturing footprint and roofing performance in terms of thermal values and sustainability. The knock-on effect of the drive for a ‘cleaner’ project delivery means sales teams not only have to be fluent in their products’ properties, an understanding of their compatibility with new technologies and environmental standards is also required.  Virtual reality has also revolutionised our personal interactivity. From simulated flight control and fairground rides, to historical battlefields and exotic holiday destinations, a world of artificial exploration is available for those with a taste for risk-averse exhilaration. It’s likely virtual reality will also prove useful to the roofing sector in the coming years, allowing stakeholders involved in a project to visualise how it will look when completed. This will help minimise misunderstandings between parties which can lead to frustrating, costly delays for the client. New technologies should – in theory at least – make for more rapid construction,with contractors able to tailor projects to a client’s specific needs. It might be that technology will replace people skills in certain areas of construction. In which case, with digital wizardry perhaps taking care of a project’s more technical aspects, it might mean the industry’s future workforce will merely require a broad range of abilities and knowledge to remain employable. Since I joined Sika-Trocal in 2004 my licensed contractors have installed more than 2million linear metres of Trocal membrane, which equates to more than 1300 miles of material – enough to cover the length of the GB and back again. During those 14 years my customer base has grown and I have thrived on the competition the market has imposed. Each day is a challenge to gain specification for Trocal products and our comprehensive range of services and accessories which include insulation, fixings and rooflights. Over the coming decade the roofing industry will doubtless face many challenges, and as practices and systems change, members will be required to adjust accordingly. With the support of trade associations such as SPRA and NFRC, the future should hold no fear for those involved in the roofing sector. Here’s to my next 2 million linear metres. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The roofing industry has undergone huge changes over the past decade, writes Shay Casey, Senior Sales Manager at Sika-Trocal. Technology has inspired its growth, with specification and design innovation keeping step with dynamic project visions. BIM modelling, digital presentations and even refurbishment surveys can be carried out using a drone or virtual programmes. Technical advancement has led to a marketplace brimming with new products and systems. Greater choice has led to increased competition, with contractors offering complete roofing and cladding packages – a major change in the specification and application process. The introduction of a wide range of new membranes has seen contractors adapt specifications to ensure the most cost-effective installation; an option not available to architects or clients who no longer have the power to uphold the original specification. This can result in them having to accept products of inferior quality, which isn’t ideal. Today’s roofing contractors need to be more financially aware than ever before, due to the rise of extended payment terms and retentions which have proven a huge burden to buyers and suppliers. Firms throughout the construction have also had to adapt to new ways of self-marketing. In previous years, a simple advert in the local newspaper or Yellow Pages was thought of as a most effective promotional tool. The internet, and more particularly, social media has revolutionised the way we communicate. Rather than rely on repeat business or word of mouth recommendations, a hefty LinkedIn or Twitter presence can spread positive word of a contractor’s service offering in a matter of seconds. Environmental concerns have also led to a welter of roofing industry changes, with the introduction of green and cool roofs, solar panels and further developments in roof lighting. The Green Guide has led to vast improvements in recycling, manufacturing footprint and roofing performance in terms of thermal values and sustainability. The knock-on effect of the drive for a ‘cleaner’ project delivery means sales teams not only have to be fluent in their products’ properties, an understanding of their compatibility with new technologies and environmental standards is also required.  Virtual reality has also revolutionised our personal interactivity. From simulated flight control and fairground rides, to historical battlefields and exotic holiday destinations, a world of artificial exploration is available for those with a taste for risk-averse exhilaration. It’s likely virtual reality will also prove useful to the roofing sector in the coming years, allowing stakeholders involved in a project to visualise how it will look when completed. This will help minimise misunderstandings between parties which can lead to frustrating, costly delays for the client. New technologies should – in theory at least – make for more rapid construction,with contractors able to tailor projects to a client’s specific needs. It might be that technology will replace people skills in certain areas of construction. In which case, with digital wizardry perhaps taking care of a project’s more technical aspects, it might mean the industry’s future workforce will merely require a broad range of abilities and knowledge to remain employable. Since I joined Sika-Trocal in 2004 my licensed contractors have installed more than 2million linear metres of Trocal membrane, which equates to more than 1300 miles of material – enough to cover the length of the GB and back again. During those 14 years my customer base has grown and I have thrived on the competition the market has imposed. Each day is a challenge to gain specification for Trocal products and our comprehensive range of services and accessories which include insulation, fixings and rooflights. Over the coming decade the roofing industry will doubtless face many challenges, and as practices and systems change, members will be required to adjust accordingly. With the support of trade associations such as SPRA and NFRC, the future should hold no fear for those involved in the roofing sector. Here’s to my next 2 million linear metres. Visit: http://gbr.sika-trocal.sika.com
    Jul 16, 2018 0
  • 06 Jun 2018
    The roofing industry has undergone huge changes over the past decade, writes Shay Casey, Senior Sales Manager at Sika-Trocal. Technology has inspired its growth, with specification and design innovation keeping step with dynamic project visions. BIM modelling, digital presentations and even refurbishment surveys can be carried out using a drone or virtual programmes. Technical advancement has led to a marketplace brimming with new products and systems. Greater choice has led to increased competition, with contractors offering complete roofing and cladding packages – a major change in the specification and application process. The introduction of a wide range of new membranes has seen contractors adapt specifications to ensure the most cost-effective installation; an option not available to architects or clients who no longer have the power to uphold the original specification. This can result in them having to accept products of inferior quality, which isn’t ideal. Communication revolution Today’s roofing contractors need to be more financially aware than ever before, due to the rise of extended payment terms and retentions which have proven a huge burden to buyers and suppliers. Firms throughout the construction have also had to adapt to new ways of self-marketing. The internet, and more particularly, social media has revolutionised the way we communicate. A large LinkedIn or Twitter presence can spread positive word of a contractor’s service offering in a matter of seconds. Environmental concerns have also led to a welter of roofing industry changes, with the introduction of green and cool roofs, solar panels and further developments in roof lighting. The Green Guide has led to vast improvements in recycling, manufacturing footprint and roofing performance in terms of thermal values and sustainability. The knock-on effect of the drive for a ‘cleaner’ project delivery means sales teams not only have to be fluent in their products’ properties, an understanding of their compatibility with new technologies and environmental standards is also required.  Virtual benefits Virtual reality is another hi-tech revelation. From simulated flight control and fairground rides, to historical battlefields and exotic holiday destinations, a world of artificial exploration is available for those with a taste for risk-averse exhilaration. It’s likely virtual reality will also prove useful to the roofing sector in the coming years, allowing stakeholders involved in a project to visualise how it will look when completed. This will help minimise misunderstandings between parties which can lead to frustrating, costly delays for the client. New technologies should – in theory – make for more rapid construction, with contractors able to tailor projects to a client’s specific needs. It might be that technology will replace people skills in certain areas of construction. In which case, with digital wizardry perhaps taking care of a project’s more technical aspects, it might mean the industry’s future workforce will merely require a broad range of abilities and knowledge to remain employable. Over the coming decade the roofing industry will doubtless face many challenges, and as practices and systems change, members will be required to adjust accordingly. With the support of trade associations such as SPRA and NFRC, the future should hold no fear for those involved in the roofing sector. Visit: www.sika.co.uk
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The roofing industry has undergone huge changes over the past decade, writes Shay Casey, Senior Sales Manager at Sika-Trocal. Technology has inspired its growth, with specification and design innovation keeping step with dynamic project visions. BIM modelling, digital presentations and even refurbishment surveys can be carried out using a drone or virtual programmes. Technical advancement has led to a marketplace brimming with new products and systems. Greater choice has led to increased competition, with contractors offering complete roofing and cladding packages – a major change in the specification and application process. The introduction of a wide range of new membranes has seen contractors adapt specifications to ensure the most cost-effective installation; an option not available to architects or clients who no longer have the power to uphold the original specification. This can result in them having to accept products of inferior quality, which isn’t ideal. Communication revolution Today’s roofing contractors need to be more financially aware than ever before, due to the rise of extended payment terms and retentions which have proven a huge burden to buyers and suppliers. Firms throughout the construction have also had to adapt to new ways of self-marketing. The internet, and more particularly, social media has revolutionised the way we communicate. A large LinkedIn or Twitter presence can spread positive word of a contractor’s service offering in a matter of seconds. Environmental concerns have also led to a welter of roofing industry changes, with the introduction of green and cool roofs, solar panels and further developments in roof lighting. The Green Guide has led to vast improvements in recycling, manufacturing footprint and roofing performance in terms of thermal values and sustainability. The knock-on effect of the drive for a ‘cleaner’ project delivery means sales teams not only have to be fluent in their products’ properties, an understanding of their compatibility with new technologies and environmental standards is also required.  Virtual benefits Virtual reality is another hi-tech revelation. From simulated flight control and fairground rides, to historical battlefields and exotic holiday destinations, a world of artificial exploration is available for those with a taste for risk-averse exhilaration. It’s likely virtual reality will also prove useful to the roofing sector in the coming years, allowing stakeholders involved in a project to visualise how it will look when completed. This will help minimise misunderstandings between parties which can lead to frustrating, costly delays for the client. New technologies should – in theory – make for more rapid construction, with contractors able to tailor projects to a client’s specific needs. It might be that technology will replace people skills in certain areas of construction. In which case, with digital wizardry perhaps taking care of a project’s more technical aspects, it might mean the industry’s future workforce will merely require a broad range of abilities and knowledge to remain employable. Over the coming decade the roofing industry will doubtless face many challenges, and as practices and systems change, members will be required to adjust accordingly. With the support of trade associations such as SPRA and NFRC, the future should hold no fear for those involved in the roofing sector. Visit: www.sika.co.uk
    Jun 06, 2018 0
  • 22 Jan 2018
    Contrary to popular belief it is almost impossible to start a fire on a green roof according to most experts. Fears that plants and other foliage would present a fire risk, particularly during the hot summer months have proved to be unfounded. Research has shown that the risk of fire is 15-20 times higher on traditional flat roofs with fully adhered bituminous waterproof membranes compared to extensive green roofs with grasses, perennials and Sedums In spite of this there has still been talk in recent years that we could be creating a “fire of London” situation where flames would spread from one green roof to another, fanned by the higher winds experienced on most tall buildings. So far, so alarmist but there is no doubt that fire fighters are concerned that in the event of a building fire, a green roof would trap heat and with the increased weight above, such a structure would provide an additional hazard once internal supports had been compromised. With the recent tragic events of Grenfell, all sectors of the construction industry are looking more closely at the regulations and developing new products and systems to provide maximum fire protection. One of the most likely potential problems for a green roof would be the spread of fire from an adjacent building via a party wall. One company, Proteus Waterproofing, based in Essex, have already identified such a scenario by producing a roof waterproof system that includes all the best U values from insulation such as PIR, combined with the fire resistant qualities of mineral wool. The system can be used with a whole range of different membranes. Such a package also offers a higher level of protection to buildings with green roofs by offering greater levels of fire resistance. It does mean of course that roofing now has to be designed in an entirely different ways to ensure that U vales are maintained and fire safety remains uncompromised. The European Standard is B Roof T4 which all roofs, particularly where it relates to party walls or compartmentation, must be achieved and this is the challenge for all new green roofs and similar design situations’ The first “true” extensive green roofs were built in Germany around 35 years ago and today it is estimated that there are at least five billion square feet of extensive green roofs built across Europe. This equals at least 350 square miles of green roofs with estimates that we are adding a further 20 new square miles every year. As green roofs have become more successful the critical comments about safety issues have also increased. However there is no record of any fire directly related to a green roof. But as we have seen, the weight of a green roof is a major potential hazard in a building fire but it now seems that we have a potential solution with companies such as Proteus developing systems that protect and contain the spread of fire. Sounds good to me…. By John Ridgeway Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Contrary to popular belief it is almost impossible to start a fire on a green roof according to most experts. Fears that plants and other foliage would present a fire risk, particularly during the hot summer months have proved to be unfounded. Research has shown that the risk of fire is 15-20 times higher on traditional flat roofs with fully adhered bituminous waterproof membranes compared to extensive green roofs with grasses, perennials and Sedums In spite of this there has still been talk in recent years that we could be creating a “fire of London” situation where flames would spread from one green roof to another, fanned by the higher winds experienced on most tall buildings. So far, so alarmist but there is no doubt that fire fighters are concerned that in the event of a building fire, a green roof would trap heat and with the increased weight above, such a structure would provide an additional hazard once internal supports had been compromised. With the recent tragic events of Grenfell, all sectors of the construction industry are looking more closely at the regulations and developing new products and systems to provide maximum fire protection. One of the most likely potential problems for a green roof would be the spread of fire from an adjacent building via a party wall. One company, Proteus Waterproofing, based in Essex, have already identified such a scenario by producing a roof waterproof system that includes all the best U values from insulation such as PIR, combined with the fire resistant qualities of mineral wool. The system can be used with a whole range of different membranes. Such a package also offers a higher level of protection to buildings with green roofs by offering greater levels of fire resistance. It does mean of course that roofing now has to be designed in an entirely different ways to ensure that U vales are maintained and fire safety remains uncompromised. The European Standard is B Roof T4 which all roofs, particularly where it relates to party walls or compartmentation, must be achieved and this is the challenge for all new green roofs and similar design situations’ The first “true” extensive green roofs were built in Germany around 35 years ago and today it is estimated that there are at least five billion square feet of extensive green roofs built across Europe. This equals at least 350 square miles of green roofs with estimates that we are adding a further 20 new square miles every year. As green roofs have become more successful the critical comments about safety issues have also increased. However there is no record of any fire directly related to a green roof. But as we have seen, the weight of a green roof is a major potential hazard in a building fire but it now seems that we have a potential solution with companies such as Proteus developing systems that protect and contain the spread of fire. Sounds good to me…. By John Ridgeway Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/
    Jan 22, 2018 0
  • 27 Oct 2017
    Earlier this year, data released by the Office for National Statistics revealed the risk of suicide among low-skilled male laborers, particularly those working in construction, was three times higher than the national average. Mental illness has long been considered something of a taboo subject within the building industry, leading to companies such as BriggsAmasco, the UK’s leading national commercial roofing company investing in training schemes designed to educate employees and help them recognise the symptoms of psychological stress. Dave Maginnis, Managing Director at BriggsAmasco, talks about the education programme and his company’s aim to highlight  issues surrounding ‘the invisible illness’. Construction is a tough environment to inhabit. The physical demands are heavy and the pace at which workers have to toil is unrelenting. There are also mental pressures. Deadlines need to be met on a daily basis to satisfy a seemingly never-ending chain of command that begins with the client, but can include a host of contractors and various trades which are dependent on a person a lot further down the line getting their bit right for a project to proceed at sufficient speed. Therefore, it’s fair to say the building industry, particularly the roofing sector, is not for the faint-hearted. If we concur with the stereotypical view, then construction workers are as tough as the materials in their possession; they’re insensitive to the perils they face in their line of duty, and they’re mostly easy-going types whose hard-earned brawn has insulated them against the fears and anxieties felt by those engaged in less-rigorous employment. The reality is somewhat different, however. This is borne out by figures that reveal one-in-six construction-based workers are suffering from a form of mental illness. The fact that suicide kills more people in the building sector than falls is even more daunting. Thankfully, it appears the industry itself is becoming aware of the health issue in its midst. Initiatives such as Mates in Mind, a recently-launched charitable programme designed to improve and promote positive mental health in construction, has the backing of the British Safety Council, the Health in Construction Leadership Group, and the Samaritans. However, when it’s considered a 2006 CIOB report, showed 70% of workers suffered from stress-related mental conditions as a direct result of working in the industry, its clear employees within the sector should be taking a firmer lead on ways to address the issue. Warning signs In June, BriggsAmasco staged a workshop for employees to help them recognise signs of mental health problems and encourage individuals to seek the right help. It was held as part of our annual Health and Safety forum on behalf of contract-related staff and subcontractors.The Mental Health First Aid coursewas delivered by a qualified, external trainer to ensure an effective and efficient approach was taken in relation to the subject. People often respond better to an outsider with a proper understanding of the topic they are delivering, and our aim was to ensure that our employees fully-absorbed the message being conveyed.   Staff interaction was encouraged throughout the course by sharing knowledge and personal experiences of the illness in an open-floor environment. Details were also shared on various mental health issues, and the warning signs to look out for, such as stress, anxiety and depression, that could indicate someone has a condition. The feedback from colleagues who attended the course was extremely positive. Most told us they found it incredibly insightful and gave them a new approach in their thought process regarding mental health issues. This was precisely the result we were hoping for. BriggsAmasco has covered more than 1,000 hours in health and safety training and awareness through internal and external courses. We also hold annual health surveillance assessments for our 200-plus safety-critical employees in which a detailed wellbeing assessment is carried out by a medical professional. This robust approach to the welfare of staff led to the company achieving ISO, 9001, 14001 and 18001 – one of a few UK organisations to meet all three standards. Adapting to change Health and Safety is paramount at BriggsAmasco. However, with so much focus being applied to the day-to-day safety aspect; the health issue is sometimes left in the background. Therefore, we felt it extremely important to raise awareness on the subject of mental health and reassure our employees that the support is there if and when required. Mental health issues reportedly account for people taking nearly 70 million days off sick per year – the most of any health condition – costing the UK economy between £70 billion and £100 billion a year. Proof, therefore, the ramifications of this debilitating condition can travel far beyond the distress it causes an individual. The construction industry has been viewed by some as resistant to adapting to changes in working practices and behaviours, but it’s been swift to act in relation to a hitherto unspoken issue: the psychological wellbeing of its employers. At BriggsAmasco, we are aiming to overturn the negative view of mental illness and open-up discussion about its causes, symptoms and diagnoses. In our opinion, the construction industry should approach the welfare of its members with the same precision applied to a high-profile building or engineering project, which means paying as much attention to the interior, as well as the exterior details.
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Earlier this year, data released by the Office for National Statistics revealed the risk of suicide among low-skilled male laborers, particularly those working in construction, was three times higher than the national average. Mental illness has long been considered something of a taboo subject within the building industry, leading to companies such as BriggsAmasco, the UK’s leading national commercial roofing company investing in training schemes designed to educate employees and help them recognise the symptoms of psychological stress. Dave Maginnis, Managing Director at BriggsAmasco, talks about the education programme and his company’s aim to highlight  issues surrounding ‘the invisible illness’. Construction is a tough environment to inhabit. The physical demands are heavy and the pace at which workers have to toil is unrelenting. There are also mental pressures. Deadlines need to be met on a daily basis to satisfy a seemingly never-ending chain of command that begins with the client, but can include a host of contractors and various trades which are dependent on a person a lot further down the line getting their bit right for a project to proceed at sufficient speed. Therefore, it’s fair to say the building industry, particularly the roofing sector, is not for the faint-hearted. If we concur with the stereotypical view, then construction workers are as tough as the materials in their possession; they’re insensitive to the perils they face in their line of duty, and they’re mostly easy-going types whose hard-earned brawn has insulated them against the fears and anxieties felt by those engaged in less-rigorous employment. The reality is somewhat different, however. This is borne out by figures that reveal one-in-six construction-based workers are suffering from a form of mental illness. The fact that suicide kills more people in the building sector than falls is even more daunting. Thankfully, it appears the industry itself is becoming aware of the health issue in its midst. Initiatives such as Mates in Mind, a recently-launched charitable programme designed to improve and promote positive mental health in construction, has the backing of the British Safety Council, the Health in Construction Leadership Group, and the Samaritans. However, when it’s considered a 2006 CIOB report, showed 70% of workers suffered from stress-related mental conditions as a direct result of working in the industry, its clear employees within the sector should be taking a firmer lead on ways to address the issue. Warning signs In June, BriggsAmasco staged a workshop for employees to help them recognise signs of mental health problems and encourage individuals to seek the right help. It was held as part of our annual Health and Safety forum on behalf of contract-related staff and subcontractors.The Mental Health First Aid coursewas delivered by a qualified, external trainer to ensure an effective and efficient approach was taken in relation to the subject. People often respond better to an outsider with a proper understanding of the topic they are delivering, and our aim was to ensure that our employees fully-absorbed the message being conveyed.   Staff interaction was encouraged throughout the course by sharing knowledge and personal experiences of the illness in an open-floor environment. Details were also shared on various mental health issues, and the warning signs to look out for, such as stress, anxiety and depression, that could indicate someone has a condition. The feedback from colleagues who attended the course was extremely positive. Most told us they found it incredibly insightful and gave them a new approach in their thought process regarding mental health issues. This was precisely the result we were hoping for. BriggsAmasco has covered more than 1,000 hours in health and safety training and awareness through internal and external courses. We also hold annual health surveillance assessments for our 200-plus safety-critical employees in which a detailed wellbeing assessment is carried out by a medical professional. This robust approach to the welfare of staff led to the company achieving ISO, 9001, 14001 and 18001 – one of a few UK organisations to meet all three standards. Adapting to change Health and Safety is paramount at BriggsAmasco. However, with so much focus being applied to the day-to-day safety aspect; the health issue is sometimes left in the background. Therefore, we felt it extremely important to raise awareness on the subject of mental health and reassure our employees that the support is there if and when required. Mental health issues reportedly account for people taking nearly 70 million days off sick per year – the most of any health condition – costing the UK economy between £70 billion and £100 billion a year. Proof, therefore, the ramifications of this debilitating condition can travel far beyond the distress it causes an individual. The construction industry has been viewed by some as resistant to adapting to changes in working practices and behaviours, but it’s been swift to act in relation to a hitherto unspoken issue: the psychological wellbeing of its employers. At BriggsAmasco, we are aiming to overturn the negative view of mental illness and open-up discussion about its causes, symptoms and diagnoses. In our opinion, the construction industry should approach the welfare of its members with the same precision applied to a high-profile building or engineering project, which means paying as much attention to the interior, as well as the exterior details.
    Oct 27, 2017 0
  • 25 Oct 2017
    Small details pay big dividends in roof specification. As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation and insulation should be considered to ensure t remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. Andrew Rowley, Senior Designer at Gradient, the UK’s leading supplier of tapered roof insulation, highlights a few seemingly minor roofing issues, which if not addressed correctly, could result in major problems following installation. By failing to prepare, we prepare for failure - an oft-repeated phrase which applies very favourably to successful roof installation and its thermal performance. In the UK, homes are responsible for 27% of carbon emissions, a statistic that requires serious attention, especially as our government committed to reducing the country’s CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050 as part of the Climate Change Act. To improve the thermal-efficiency of buildings old and new, perhaps we’d be advised to adhere to another well-known phrase - prevention is better than cure. Tapered and tailored to suit  The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered roofing solutions can help alleviate risk when it comes to insulation. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with companies such as Gradient which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of a suitable system for a wide range of roofing applications. Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients neglect to engage such company’s at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks resulting in underperforming U-values is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from the roof insulation manufacturer. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation sizes long before they start casting concrete is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Mind the gaps Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Strip to reveal For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. With budgets being tightened across the sector as uncertainty over Britain’s post-Brexit future remains; so ever-tighter deadlines must be met. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the finish line. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com/  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Small details pay big dividends in roof specification. As a building’s first line of defence and prominent thermal feature, a roof must maintain long-term, maximum performance. Therefore, every aspect of its installation and insulation should be considered to ensure t remains watertight, problem-free and energy-efficient during its lifetime. Andrew Rowley, Senior Designer at Gradient, the UK’s leading supplier of tapered roof insulation, highlights a few seemingly minor roofing issues, which if not addressed correctly, could result in major problems following installation. By failing to prepare, we prepare for failure - an oft-repeated phrase which applies very favourably to successful roof installation and its thermal performance. In the UK, homes are responsible for 27% of carbon emissions, a statistic that requires serious attention, especially as our government committed to reducing the country’s CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050 as part of the Climate Change Act. To improve the thermal-efficiency of buildings old and new, perhaps we’d be advised to adhere to another well-known phrase - prevention is better than cure. Tapered and tailored to suit  The specification of bespoke, single-layer tapered roofing solutions can help alleviate risk when it comes to insulation. This outcome is easiest and best achieved in conjunction with companies such as Gradient which works closely with customers on the design and manufacture of a suitable system for a wide range of roofing applications. Placing the insulation process - from start to finish - into the hands of highly-experienced and skilled professionals not only maximises control standards in roof design, manufacture, performance and sustainability, it results in a better-conceived flat roof which is improved in value, performance and complies with all relevant legislative standards. Gradient is able to supply specialist technical support to provide customers with flat roof solutions - whatever a roofing project’s stage. However, it’s fair to say most problems occur when clients neglect to engage such company’s at the very start of the roof specification process which minimises the risk of future problems. The close proximity of door thresholds to roof decks resulting in underperforming U-values is a common issue. It’s an oversight which can lead to water-ponding and possible insect infestation, but can easily be avoided with early involvement from the roof insulation manufacturer. In such cases, a tapered roof insulation scheme can be applied, but the thermal performance will not be as good as it ought to be due to the aforementioned fault at the design stage. Encouraging developers to consider roof insulation sizes long before they start casting concrete is key to trouble-free roofing. When a building’s shell and certain fixtures and fittings are in position before roofing issues have been fully-addressed, it can often lead to height limitations being imposed on the insulation installed. Thus, flat guttering, the same thickness as the insulation is seen as a solution. Whilst this might be seen as a perfectly acceptable system for installers, developers would quite reasonably prefer a completely run-dry roof on which water is pushed to all available outlets. Mind the gaps Constraints on insulation height will sometimes rule-out the use of a fully-tapered roofing scheme, therefore a compromise on a particular roofing detail may have to be reached. It could lead to a roof design which doesn’t necessarily reflect best practice, but is nonetheless the best scheme with all factors considered. Compromise can take the form of a lower U-value, or the installation of a hybrid roof scheme in which insulation is applied below the deck. The latter solution is not ideal, as condensation is often a by-product. However, roofing firms such as Gradient are able to carry out calculations for a hybrid roof that will eliminate the risk of condensation. Whichever roofing insulation specified, its performance is only as good as the installer. Selecting a proven contractor to carry out installation work is vital - a task becoming more challenging by the day with Britain facing its biggest skills shortage for a generation, particularly in the roofing industry. If a contractor omits to fully-tackle air gaps, for example, in a perfectly-designed roof, the potential for condensation remains. Strip to reveal For developer, contractor and customer, time is money in the construction industry. With budgets being tightened across the sector as uncertainty over Britain’s post-Brexit future remains; so ever-tighter deadlines must be met. However, quality must not be lost in the rush to reach the finish line. For refurbishment projects in which an existing roof is overlaid, Gradient is able to design a tapered scheme, with surveys made all the easier due to the visibility of the building’s falls. It’s part of the company’s service to carry out the same assessment when a roof is stripped to its deck. Time restrictions will often lead to contractors refusing the offer of a second visit, even though the stripped roof could reveal a deck to be damaged or uneven and in need of a rethink as to how the insulation should be applied to improve its long-term performance. Again, the answer is good preparation. Building extra time into a roof’s installation before installers arrive on site will help avoid unseen issues which may crop-up as the process continues. Quality roof insulation, which protects against the ravages of the elements and time, as part of a long-term, waterproof system, doesn’t arrive by accident - it’s most definitely the result of excellent design and installation. Visit: http://gradientuk.com/  
    Oct 25, 2017 0
  • 18 Oct 2017
    Roofing can be an incredibly precarious profession, writes Dean O’Grady, Product Manager at Sika. One in five deaths in construction work involves roof projects, whether in the course of carrying out specialist work or simple maintenance. A roof’s height and potential fragility creates an immediate risk factor, which is increased manifold by the use of naked flame processes applied during installation or maintenance. To help reduce the perils associated with roof fires through naked flame applications used to dry-out or install torch-on membranes, the NFRC has launched a Safe2Torch campaign. Roof contractors across the UK are being asked to support the initiative which offers a host of best practice guidelines designed to minimise the threat of roof fire and reduce the risk to life and property. Companies which pledge their support to the campaign will indicate they have read and understood the guidance and are committed to promoting and implementing the campaign throughout their organisation. This will provide clients with the assurance that their contractor/manufacturer has planned their roof works in accordance with safety advice outlined in the Safe2Torch campaign. Safety points Included within the Safe2Torch campaign is a section focusing on pre-hot works checks that should be carried out to eliminate potential hazards associated with the use of gas torches. These include: Ensuring any combustible materials such as dry leaves, flammable liquids, wood, paper, etc, are removed from the working area Assessing the roofing substrate, as under no circumstances should a torch be applied direct to a timber-based deck or upstand Avoiding naked flame or high heat contact with foam or fibreboard combustible fillers found in expansion joints Selecting a torch-free product for abutments with open cavities or open perpends Avoiding using naked flames near fixed timber, plastic fascia or soffits Although Sika specialises in roofing products that eliminate the use of a naked flame applications, we would urge companies throughout the industry to support the Safe2Torch campaign, as we feel the health and safety of employees within our sector should be the number one priority of manufacturers and contractors alike. Ultimately, the way to mitigate issues with roofing naked flame works is to select a safer installation system. This will not only improve safety, it can help reduce installation time and on-site costs. Sika supplies a wide range of products which are rapid and simple to install for a wide range of flat roof applications. Cold options For example, the Sika-Trocal S-Vap 5000E SA is a new multi-layer, self-adhesive vapour control layer, which offers superb bonding strength for air-tight roof construction. Consisting of polymer-modified bitumen with a glass-fibre mat reinforcement and an aluminium foil as top layer, The self-adhesive feature eliminates the use of naked-flame installation, making for safe, simple and quick installation. It can also provide a temporary waterproof layer for up to four weeks without the aid of additional weight, ballast or mechanical fastening.  Capable of withstanding heavy foot traffic without tearing, S-Vap 5000E SA is perfect for use on profiled metal decks. Ideal for a range of substrates, it can be used in conjunction with Sika C-250 Spray insulation adhesive in an adhered roof build-up without the need for fasteners to secure thermal insulation boards. Sika C-250 Spray is applied via a pressurised canister that covers an approximate 140m², in minutes, a benefit that has helped speed-up the installation of Sika-Trocal single-ply roofing systems by up to 50%. Primer 610, also from Sika-Trocal, has been specifically developed alongside S-Vap 5000E SA. also spray-applied via a pressurised canister that covers an approximate 180m2  to 200m2 roofing area, Primer 610 dries in minutes; a benefit that also helps speed-up the installation of Sika-Trocal single-ply roofing systems. Like the S-Vap 5000E SA, versatility is one of the Primer 610 system’s many strengths, enabling its use on many existing substrates. The NFRC is to be applauded for its Safe2Torch initiative; any campaign which seeks to make the industry safer deserves our utmost attention and respect. Bituminous systems have been around for centuries, and because ‘torch-on’ is tried-and-tested with contractors reluctant to change their application method, it’s likely hot-working practices will continue for years to come. There is an alternative, however, and with on-site safety quite rightly a major concern within the industry, perhaps it’s time roofing companies warmed to the idea of systems without hot works. For more on the Safe2Torch campaign, contact: safe2torch@nfrc.co.uk .
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Roofing can be an incredibly precarious profession, writes Dean O’Grady, Product Manager at Sika. One in five deaths in construction work involves roof projects, whether in the course of carrying out specialist work or simple maintenance. A roof’s height and potential fragility creates an immediate risk factor, which is increased manifold by the use of naked flame processes applied during installation or maintenance. To help reduce the perils associated with roof fires through naked flame applications used to dry-out or install torch-on membranes, the NFRC has launched a Safe2Torch campaign. Roof contractors across the UK are being asked to support the initiative which offers a host of best practice guidelines designed to minimise the threat of roof fire and reduce the risk to life and property. Companies which pledge their support to the campaign will indicate they have read and understood the guidance and are committed to promoting and implementing the campaign throughout their organisation. This will provide clients with the assurance that their contractor/manufacturer has planned their roof works in accordance with safety advice outlined in the Safe2Torch campaign. Safety points Included within the Safe2Torch campaign is a section focusing on pre-hot works checks that should be carried out to eliminate potential hazards associated with the use of gas torches. These include: Ensuring any combustible materials such as dry leaves, flammable liquids, wood, paper, etc, are removed from the working area Assessing the roofing substrate, as under no circumstances should a torch be applied direct to a timber-based deck or upstand Avoiding naked flame or high heat contact with foam or fibreboard combustible fillers found in expansion joints Selecting a torch-free product for abutments with open cavities or open perpends Avoiding using naked flames near fixed timber, plastic fascia or soffits Although Sika specialises in roofing products that eliminate the use of a naked flame applications, we would urge companies throughout the industry to support the Safe2Torch campaign, as we feel the health and safety of employees within our sector should be the number one priority of manufacturers and contractors alike. Ultimately, the way to mitigate issues with roofing naked flame works is to select a safer installation system. This will not only improve safety, it can help reduce installation time and on-site costs. Sika supplies a wide range of products which are rapid and simple to install for a wide range of flat roof applications. Cold options For example, the Sika-Trocal S-Vap 5000E SA is a new multi-layer, self-adhesive vapour control layer, which offers superb bonding strength for air-tight roof construction. Consisting of polymer-modified bitumen with a glass-fibre mat reinforcement and an aluminium foil as top layer, The self-adhesive feature eliminates the use of naked-flame installation, making for safe, simple and quick installation. It can also provide a temporary waterproof layer for up to four weeks without the aid of additional weight, ballast or mechanical fastening.  Capable of withstanding heavy foot traffic without tearing, S-Vap 5000E SA is perfect for use on profiled metal decks. Ideal for a range of substrates, it can be used in conjunction with Sika C-250 Spray insulation adhesive in an adhered roof build-up without the need for fasteners to secure thermal insulation boards. Sika C-250 Spray is applied via a pressurised canister that covers an approximate 140m², in minutes, a benefit that has helped speed-up the installation of Sika-Trocal single-ply roofing systems by up to 50%. Primer 610, also from Sika-Trocal, has been specifically developed alongside S-Vap 5000E SA. also spray-applied via a pressurised canister that covers an approximate 180m2  to 200m2 roofing area, Primer 610 dries in minutes; a benefit that also helps speed-up the installation of Sika-Trocal single-ply roofing systems. Like the S-Vap 5000E SA, versatility is one of the Primer 610 system’s many strengths, enabling its use on many existing substrates. The NFRC is to be applauded for its Safe2Torch initiative; any campaign which seeks to make the industry safer deserves our utmost attention and respect. Bituminous systems have been around for centuries, and because ‘torch-on’ is tried-and-tested with contractors reluctant to change their application method, it’s likely hot-working practices will continue for years to come. There is an alternative, however, and with on-site safety quite rightly a major concern within the industry, perhaps it’s time roofing companies warmed to the idea of systems without hot works. For more on the Safe2Torch campaign, contact: safe2torch@nfrc.co.uk .
    Oct 18, 2017 0
  • 10 Oct 2017
    The move towards mortar-free, dry fix roof and drainage solutions has made it quicker, easier and safer to install throughout the build process. Offering a wealth of benefits to the installer and homeowner, Hayley Lowry, Marketing Manager of Ariel Plastics outlines the dry-fix options for new-build projects and how these systems are the simple, cost-effective, low maintenance route to a weathertight roof, whatever the elements have in store. Dry fix roofing is the term used to describe the mechanical fixing of roofing materials. Traditional mortar bedding is still the most widely-used fixing method in England and Wales, in contrast to Scotland, where 80% of roofing is already mechanically-fixed. However, the increased incidence of storms during recent years has clearly highlighted the unreliability of mortar. The switch to dry fix roofing in Britain and Ireland is well established but looks set to gather even greater momentum. Considering all the advantages, it is not difficult to see why. The roof is the most exposed part of any building. Using mortar to secure vulnerable areas of the roof, such as the verge, will inevitably lead to future maintenance. Differential movement causes mortar to crack and no reliance should be placed on its tensile or shear strength. The action of frost and rain will exploit the development of hairline cracks. In contrast, because dry fix roofing is mechanically-fixed it offers improved safety, security and increased resistance to wind uplift and water penetration. Dry fixing is a year-round solution; it can be carried out in damp and freezing conditions. A fast and simple process, it’s a method that eliminates the need for mix-and-apply mortar and its incurring mess. Special skills and tools are not required to dry fix, making it highly cost-effective. It also complies with BS 5534, a new code of practice that details design standards, performance and installation of pitched roofs and vertical cladding using slates, tiles and wooden shingles. Regulation change BS 5534 came into force in February 2015 and outlined a number of changes including the use of mortar, which can no longer be used in isolation to fix ridges and hips. These should now also be mechanically-fixed. Fixing requirements for roof tiles have been increased in the latest code of practice which also requires all single-lapped tiles on a roof to be mechanically-fixed. It also states perimeter tiles should now have a minimum of two fixings. In addition, testing bodies now have to assess the measurement of the wind uplift resistance of underlays. The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations place a duty of care on designers to select building components that minimise health and safety risks, not only during construction, but during future maintenance. The use of dry fix roofing eliminates the need to repair failed mortar bedding, therefore avoiding future maintenance work and improving safety on site. In terms of dry fix options, mortar-freeproducts which provide a unique jointing system and can be used with half-round and angled ridges are ideal for this practice. This is not only the quickest method of installing ridge tiles to a roof; it produces a neat ridge line of traditional appearance whilst also providing high-level ventilation. Product options For dry verge, the ideal products are ones which enable verge tile fixing without the need for mortar whilst protecting verge tiles from wind uplift, pest infestation and weather degradation. Most systems are universal and come in a range of colours to blend with most tiles, slates and bargeboards. With the UK experiencing more frequent extreme weather conditions, greater responsibility has been placed on the roofing underlay to cope with increasing wind forces. The potential effect of an underlay subjected to excessive wind loading is for it to balloon upwards potentially causing the tiles or slates to dislodge. This issue has been addressed in the latest revision to BS5534: 2014 Code of Practice for Slating and Tiling. Effective from March 2015, the guidance outlines the minimum requirements for taping the side laps of roofing underlays dependent on the exposure of the roof to wind uplift, batten gauge and the underlay selected. In addition to the prevention of wind uplift, the taping of side laps of roofing underlays helps improve the thermal performance of a building by reducing air filtration and convective heat loss. Dry fix valleys are another product option. Fully-weatherproof options manufactured from GRP are now available offering a cost-effective alternative to lead.  Dry fixing of valley troughs is quicker, less dependent on site skills and guarantees a neater finish than mortar bedding. Slate, tile and ridge vents are available to install mechanically on the roof without the need for mortar. Similarly, a wide range of eaves ventilation products are available to mechanically fix: eaves vent kits, rafter and fascia trays, over fascia vents and soffit vents. With availability of so many proven products, it’s no wonder the construction industry is rapidly turning to dry fix products as the quick, easy-to-apply, cost-effective solution for weathertight roofing. Visit: http://www.arielplastics.com/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The move towards mortar-free, dry fix roof and drainage solutions has made it quicker, easier and safer to install throughout the build process. Offering a wealth of benefits to the installer and homeowner, Hayley Lowry, Marketing Manager of Ariel Plastics outlines the dry-fix options for new-build projects and how these systems are the simple, cost-effective, low maintenance route to a weathertight roof, whatever the elements have in store. Dry fix roofing is the term used to describe the mechanical fixing of roofing materials. Traditional mortar bedding is still the most widely-used fixing method in England and Wales, in contrast to Scotland, where 80% of roofing is already mechanically-fixed. However, the increased incidence of storms during recent years has clearly highlighted the unreliability of mortar. The switch to dry fix roofing in Britain and Ireland is well established but looks set to gather even greater momentum. Considering all the advantages, it is not difficult to see why. The roof is the most exposed part of any building. Using mortar to secure vulnerable areas of the roof, such as the verge, will inevitably lead to future maintenance. Differential movement causes mortar to crack and no reliance should be placed on its tensile or shear strength. The action of frost and rain will exploit the development of hairline cracks. In contrast, because dry fix roofing is mechanically-fixed it offers improved safety, security and increased resistance to wind uplift and water penetration. Dry fixing is a year-round solution; it can be carried out in damp and freezing conditions. A fast and simple process, it’s a method that eliminates the need for mix-and-apply mortar and its incurring mess. Special skills and tools are not required to dry fix, making it highly cost-effective. It also complies with BS 5534, a new code of practice that details design standards, performance and installation of pitched roofs and vertical cladding using slates, tiles and wooden shingles. Regulation change BS 5534 came into force in February 2015 and outlined a number of changes including the use of mortar, which can no longer be used in isolation to fix ridges and hips. These should now also be mechanically-fixed. Fixing requirements for roof tiles have been increased in the latest code of practice which also requires all single-lapped tiles on a roof to be mechanically-fixed. It also states perimeter tiles should now have a minimum of two fixings. In addition, testing bodies now have to assess the measurement of the wind uplift resistance of underlays. The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations place a duty of care on designers to select building components that minimise health and safety risks, not only during construction, but during future maintenance. The use of dry fix roofing eliminates the need to repair failed mortar bedding, therefore avoiding future maintenance work and improving safety on site. In terms of dry fix options, mortar-freeproducts which provide a unique jointing system and can be used with half-round and angled ridges are ideal for this practice. This is not only the quickest method of installing ridge tiles to a roof; it produces a neat ridge line of traditional appearance whilst also providing high-level ventilation. Product options For dry verge, the ideal products are ones which enable verge tile fixing without the need for mortar whilst protecting verge tiles from wind uplift, pest infestation and weather degradation. Most systems are universal and come in a range of colours to blend with most tiles, slates and bargeboards. With the UK experiencing more frequent extreme weather conditions, greater responsibility has been placed on the roofing underlay to cope with increasing wind forces. The potential effect of an underlay subjected to excessive wind loading is for it to balloon upwards potentially causing the tiles or slates to dislodge. This issue has been addressed in the latest revision to BS5534: 2014 Code of Practice for Slating and Tiling. Effective from March 2015, the guidance outlines the minimum requirements for taping the side laps of roofing underlays dependent on the exposure of the roof to wind uplift, batten gauge and the underlay selected. In addition to the prevention of wind uplift, the taping of side laps of roofing underlays helps improve the thermal performance of a building by reducing air filtration and convective heat loss. Dry fix valleys are another product option. Fully-weatherproof options manufactured from GRP are now available offering a cost-effective alternative to lead.  Dry fixing of valley troughs is quicker, less dependent on site skills and guarantees a neater finish than mortar bedding. Slate, tile and ridge vents are available to install mechanically on the roof without the need for mortar. Similarly, a wide range of eaves ventilation products are available to mechanically fix: eaves vent kits, rafter and fascia trays, over fascia vents and soffit vents. With availability of so many proven products, it’s no wonder the construction industry is rapidly turning to dry fix products as the quick, easy-to-apply, cost-effective solution for weathertight roofing. Visit: http://www.arielplastics.com/
    Oct 10, 2017 0
  • 01 Oct 2017
    A new organisation, the National Construction Training Services (NCTS) has recently launched with the provision of a Centre of Excellence for roofing skills. This unique, nationwide programme will enable roofing contractors to access specialist roofing lead and hard metals training more locally to them. In time this will be extended to all of the construction trades. Working closely with roofing federations, local roof training groups and other key industry stakeholders the NCTS claims it will be able to deliver the highest levels of training to anyone looking to develop their skills or indeed start a career in the roofing industry. This is excellent news and comes at a time when training has a large question mark over it with changes in legislation. With growing emphasis to have professionally assessed NVQ qualified card carrying operatives only on site by 2020, action is needed now to address critical training issues and raise standards across the industry. The NCTS commitment is to ensure all students can develop the confidence and knowledge they need to solidify their future in the construction industry. Offering a hugely flexible curriculum the NCTS is able to tailor courses to individual roofing contractor’s requirements in a location which works for them. Courses are developed to help every level of skill, from beginner to skilled tradesmen and will seek to provide a positive impact on the growing skills shortage facing the UK’s construction sector. By focusing on vocational apprenticeships, upskilling and assessing workers in key areas such as lead, hard metals, copper, zinc, stainless steel and heritage leadwork skills the NCTS is able to ensure a future for the UK’s roofing sector. Applying training in innovative and modern techniques means there is an opportunity for workers to have pride and confidence in the jobs they do. This will help with retention and will attract a new generation of roofers. The NCTS says it is proud to be working towards the goal of ensuring that the sector-wide issue of skills and quality is being answered through their dedication. They recognise that a fully developed training path is essential to fulfilling this goal. With targets for the industry’s annual recruitment requirement of 46,000 operatives by 2018 the need for developing these key training programmes is needed more than ever. NCTS differs because of the importance it is placing not just on new workers but also upskilling to reduce the churn rates and keep workers in the sector. A spokesperson from the NCTS said “The NCTS provides much needed support to the industry and is working closely with federations and employers to support strategic training needs”. The industry is looking for support across a range of priorities that the NCTS is confident it can help to solve. By reducing the skills shortage, increasing access to training, providing nationwide assessment programs and increasing the number of trainers available across the UK the NCTS can ensure that a career in roofing, and the image of the industry, continues to improve. The NCTS believe that roofing is a desirable and highly-skilled job which can lead to a real passion for the work if taught and nurtured correctly. The trainers and support offered by the NCTS can help to nurture these passions and ensure the future of roofing is in safe hands. Sounds good and let’s hope that it works – the industry needs it. Visit: http://www.ncts.org.uk  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • A new organisation, the National Construction Training Services (NCTS) has recently launched with the provision of a Centre of Excellence for roofing skills. This unique, nationwide programme will enable roofing contractors to access specialist roofing lead and hard metals training more locally to them. In time this will be extended to all of the construction trades. Working closely with roofing federations, local roof training groups and other key industry stakeholders the NCTS claims it will be able to deliver the highest levels of training to anyone looking to develop their skills or indeed start a career in the roofing industry. This is excellent news and comes at a time when training has a large question mark over it with changes in legislation. With growing emphasis to have professionally assessed NVQ qualified card carrying operatives only on site by 2020, action is needed now to address critical training issues and raise standards across the industry. The NCTS commitment is to ensure all students can develop the confidence and knowledge they need to solidify their future in the construction industry. Offering a hugely flexible curriculum the NCTS is able to tailor courses to individual roofing contractor’s requirements in a location which works for them. Courses are developed to help every level of skill, from beginner to skilled tradesmen and will seek to provide a positive impact on the growing skills shortage facing the UK’s construction sector. By focusing on vocational apprenticeships, upskilling and assessing workers in key areas such as lead, hard metals, copper, zinc, stainless steel and heritage leadwork skills the NCTS is able to ensure a future for the UK’s roofing sector. Applying training in innovative and modern techniques means there is an opportunity for workers to have pride and confidence in the jobs they do. This will help with retention and will attract a new generation of roofers. The NCTS says it is proud to be working towards the goal of ensuring that the sector-wide issue of skills and quality is being answered through their dedication. They recognise that a fully developed training path is essential to fulfilling this goal. With targets for the industry’s annual recruitment requirement of 46,000 operatives by 2018 the need for developing these key training programmes is needed more than ever. NCTS differs because of the importance it is placing not just on new workers but also upskilling to reduce the churn rates and keep workers in the sector. A spokesperson from the NCTS said “The NCTS provides much needed support to the industry and is working closely with federations and employers to support strategic training needs”. The industry is looking for support across a range of priorities that the NCTS is confident it can help to solve. By reducing the skills shortage, increasing access to training, providing nationwide assessment programs and increasing the number of trainers available across the UK the NCTS can ensure that a career in roofing, and the image of the industry, continues to improve. The NCTS believe that roofing is a desirable and highly-skilled job which can lead to a real passion for the work if taught and nurtured correctly. The trainers and support offered by the NCTS can help to nurture these passions and ensure the future of roofing is in safe hands. Sounds good and let’s hope that it works – the industry needs it. Visit: http://www.ncts.org.uk  
    Oct 01, 2017 0
  • 18 Sep 2017
    It is now possible to go from green concrete to green roof in just three days. There will of course be many who say it cannot be done, but they are being proved wrong by a company that is leading the market with a new kind of waterproofing technology – and it’s confounding the traditionalists. With increasing pressure on building costs and owners strictly enforcing projects to be delivered on time and within budget, any roof waterproofing system that can save almost a calendar month in time and allow other trades to begin work within days of new concrete being laid, has to be welcome. At present it is generally considered that green concrete cannot be waterproofed until around 28 days after installation. The maximum amount of trapped water contained in the concrete has to be allowed to escape for the concrete to cure properly which effectively means that the project can be on hold during that time. So all credit to Proteus Waterproofing, one the fastest growing companies of its kind, for developing such a system - Cold-Melt® - which is making all other waterproof membranes look obsolete. It’s a seamless application consisting of two main waterproofing layers – the first of which can be laid over green concrete after just three days sealing the building while still allowing the concrete to cure and continue drying out in the usual way. The system is so advanced that the first layer is all that is needed to waterproof the building and if the project demands it, then the final layer does not have to be applied until all other trades have completed their work. This is another significant plus as other trades frequently damage membranes leading to costly repairs and delays. Cold-Melt® is not as prone to such damage, is easily repaired and will have an additional finishing waterproof layer as the project progresses. In fact the BBA have certified that the Cold-Melt® system is so tough that it will last for the life time of the building on which it is installed. No one is saying that Cold-Melt® will replace all other types of waterproof membrane – each has its own particular place in the market – but there is no doubt that this is a unique product that is ticking a lot of boxes for building owners and specifiers. As well as the fact that it can be rapidly installed, Cold-Melt® as the name suggests, does not use any naked flame or molten material and because it is virtually odour free, delivers maximum health and safety and minimum disruption. It is manufactured from recycled rubber crumb and other environment friendly materials such as castor oil and other organically grown products to create an elastomeric, cold applied membrane so sustainability also gets the thumbs up. But let’s get back to the beginning – green concrete to green roof in just three days is now a reality. This seems to be a system that is ready for anything and for the moment - there is nothing else like it in the roofing market. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • It is now possible to go from green concrete to green roof in just three days. There will of course be many who say it cannot be done, but they are being proved wrong by a company that is leading the market with a new kind of waterproofing technology – and it’s confounding the traditionalists. With increasing pressure on building costs and owners strictly enforcing projects to be delivered on time and within budget, any roof waterproofing system that can save almost a calendar month in time and allow other trades to begin work within days of new concrete being laid, has to be welcome. At present it is generally considered that green concrete cannot be waterproofed until around 28 days after installation. The maximum amount of trapped water contained in the concrete has to be allowed to escape for the concrete to cure properly which effectively means that the project can be on hold during that time. So all credit to Proteus Waterproofing, one the fastest growing companies of its kind, for developing such a system - Cold-Melt® - which is making all other waterproof membranes look obsolete. It’s a seamless application consisting of two main waterproofing layers – the first of which can be laid over green concrete after just three days sealing the building while still allowing the concrete to cure and continue drying out in the usual way. The system is so advanced that the first layer is all that is needed to waterproof the building and if the project demands it, then the final layer does not have to be applied until all other trades have completed their work. This is another significant plus as other trades frequently damage membranes leading to costly repairs and delays. Cold-Melt® is not as prone to such damage, is easily repaired and will have an additional finishing waterproof layer as the project progresses. In fact the BBA have certified that the Cold-Melt® system is so tough that it will last for the life time of the building on which it is installed. No one is saying that Cold-Melt® will replace all other types of waterproof membrane – each has its own particular place in the market – but there is no doubt that this is a unique product that is ticking a lot of boxes for building owners and specifiers. As well as the fact that it can be rapidly installed, Cold-Melt® as the name suggests, does not use any naked flame or molten material and because it is virtually odour free, delivers maximum health and safety and minimum disruption. It is manufactured from recycled rubber crumb and other environment friendly materials such as castor oil and other organically grown products to create an elastomeric, cold applied membrane so sustainability also gets the thumbs up. But let’s get back to the beginning – green concrete to green roof in just three days is now a reality. This seems to be a system that is ready for anything and for the moment - there is nothing else like it in the roofing market. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/
    Sep 18, 2017 0
  • 01 Sep 2017
    The National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC) should be congratulated for their latest initiative to raise the profile of the workforce and improve standards. Chief executive James Talman has set out three objectives which he believes are needed to take the industry forward in what he calls “The Roofing Sector Workforce Development Strategy.” These are to: Establish roofing as a professional, modern respected and aspirational sector with clear career paths; able to attract the best and brightest apprentices, students and new works. Formalise and standardise a higher UK-wide training, accreditation and assessment infrastructure, to upskill and multi-skill its growing work force. Proactive engagement with all roofing sector companies, suppliers and trade associations and seeking endorsement and commitment from all procurement stakeholders; enabling growth increased training and access to grants and higher standards. In all the excitement it would be easy to forget that there is one key sector within roofing that successfully went down this path many years ago – and that would be the mastic asphalt industry. Most of the major contractors within mastic asphalt, via its trade association MAC, have successfully encouraged and supported apprenticeships for many years. All operatives have to have some three years of training before they reach the required craft skills - backed by CITB-approved training schemes, to a minimum of NVQ Level 2 and, ideally, to NVQ Level 3. It has resulted in the most highly trained workforce within roofing which has enabled the industry to support some of the most comprehensive guarantee schemes and warranties – knowing that it has a proven product that can only be installed by the very best. Until now there have been few other areas within roofing that offer the same high standards and support for building owners, architects and all other construction professionals, so it can only be hoped that James Talman will succeed with his new initiative. MAC successfully gives accreditation to all its members and over the years the NFRC has also ensured that it attracts the best operatives, but it only has around 1,000 members and these already represent the cream of the industry. Proof that the scheme will work will only be seen when this initiative goes out to a wider audience. We still have many thousands of so called “ladder and bucket” roofers which are traditionally hard to reach with any new message. We have even more general builders who call themselves roofing contractors when a potential job is in the offing – so it will be intriguing to see how the strategy will work in these areas. The rest of Europe does things slightly differently and roofing is seen for the highly skilled job it really is so I hope that this initiative will succeed at every level and root out the cowboys and make it impossible for them to operate. I fear that this is still a long way off – but you have to start somewhere – so all power to the NFRC. By John Ridgeway  Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC) should be congratulated for their latest initiative to raise the profile of the workforce and improve standards. Chief executive James Talman has set out three objectives which he believes are needed to take the industry forward in what he calls “The Roofing Sector Workforce Development Strategy.” These are to: Establish roofing as a professional, modern respected and aspirational sector with clear career paths; able to attract the best and brightest apprentices, students and new works. Formalise and standardise a higher UK-wide training, accreditation and assessment infrastructure, to upskill and multi-skill its growing work force. Proactive engagement with all roofing sector companies, suppliers and trade associations and seeking endorsement and commitment from all procurement stakeholders; enabling growth increased training and access to grants and higher standards. In all the excitement it would be easy to forget that there is one key sector within roofing that successfully went down this path many years ago – and that would be the mastic asphalt industry. Most of the major contractors within mastic asphalt, via its trade association MAC, have successfully encouraged and supported apprenticeships for many years. All operatives have to have some three years of training before they reach the required craft skills - backed by CITB-approved training schemes, to a minimum of NVQ Level 2 and, ideally, to NVQ Level 3. It has resulted in the most highly trained workforce within roofing which has enabled the industry to support some of the most comprehensive guarantee schemes and warranties – knowing that it has a proven product that can only be installed by the very best. Until now there have been few other areas within roofing that offer the same high standards and support for building owners, architects and all other construction professionals, so it can only be hoped that James Talman will succeed with his new initiative. MAC successfully gives accreditation to all its members and over the years the NFRC has also ensured that it attracts the best operatives, but it only has around 1,000 members and these already represent the cream of the industry. Proof that the scheme will work will only be seen when this initiative goes out to a wider audience. We still have many thousands of so called “ladder and bucket” roofers which are traditionally hard to reach with any new message. We have even more general builders who call themselves roofing contractors when a potential job is in the offing – so it will be intriguing to see how the strategy will work in these areas. The rest of Europe does things slightly differently and roofing is seen for the highly skilled job it really is so I hope that this initiative will succeed at every level and root out the cowboys and make it impossible for them to operate. I fear that this is still a long way off – but you have to start somewhere – so all power to the NFRC. By John Ridgeway  Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99  
    Sep 01, 2017 0
  • 28 Aug 2017
    Building owners have become increasingly nervous in recent years about sanctioning the use of any kind of naked flame at roof level, traditionally a long standing method of applying waterproof membranes. This has resulted from increased pressure from insurance companies concerned about fire risk and some have banned the use completely of naked flame at roof level following several high profile incidents. The industry has responded with a huge range of cold applied membranes – some more effective than others – but now there is a new trend which could totally transform the way flat roofs are waterproofed. It is called Cold Melt®, an application registered by Proteus Waterproofing which offers building owners a membrane with all the advantages of the seamless application offered by mastic asphalt and hot melt products – with none of the perceived risks associated with other types of membrane. It must be emphasised that the roofing industry has an exemplary safety record with flame applied membranes and modern torches used for products such as felt significantly reduce the potential for fire risks, but cold melt seems to offer a lot more than a simple health and safety boost. By eliminating the need for heat then Cold Melt can be applied significantly more quickly by helping to reduce labour costs, but more importantly the membrane, according to the BBA (British Board of Agrement) will, when correctly applied will last for literally as long as the building remains standing. That’s quite a claim but when endorsed by the BBA it suggests that roofing membranes are now entering a new era but what is Cold Melt? Let’s look at the Commercial. Cold-Melt® is claimed to incorporate recycled rubber crumb and other organically grown products to create an elastomeric, seamless, cold applied membrane that can be applied to a wide range of substrates including concrete, asphalt and timber. As it exhibits extremely low odour, Cold-Melt® can also be applied in confined working spaces. So it seems there is a new kid on the block with some healthy credentials to back up his performance and if nothing else – it will keep the insurance companies happy. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Building owners have become increasingly nervous in recent years about sanctioning the use of any kind of naked flame at roof level, traditionally a long standing method of applying waterproof membranes. This has resulted from increased pressure from insurance companies concerned about fire risk and some have banned the use completely of naked flame at roof level following several high profile incidents. The industry has responded with a huge range of cold applied membranes – some more effective than others – but now there is a new trend which could totally transform the way flat roofs are waterproofed. It is called Cold Melt®, an application registered by Proteus Waterproofing which offers building owners a membrane with all the advantages of the seamless application offered by mastic asphalt and hot melt products – with none of the perceived risks associated with other types of membrane. It must be emphasised that the roofing industry has an exemplary safety record with flame applied membranes and modern torches used for products such as felt significantly reduce the potential for fire risks, but cold melt seems to offer a lot more than a simple health and safety boost. By eliminating the need for heat then Cold Melt can be applied significantly more quickly by helping to reduce labour costs, but more importantly the membrane, according to the BBA (British Board of Agrement) will, when correctly applied will last for literally as long as the building remains standing. That’s quite a claim but when endorsed by the BBA it suggests that roofing membranes are now entering a new era but what is Cold Melt? Let’s look at the Commercial. Cold-Melt® is claimed to incorporate recycled rubber crumb and other organically grown products to create an elastomeric, seamless, cold applied membrane that can be applied to a wide range of substrates including concrete, asphalt and timber. As it exhibits extremely low odour, Cold-Melt® can also be applied in confined working spaces. So it seems there is a new kid on the block with some healthy credentials to back up his performance and if nothing else – it will keep the insurance companies happy. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk  
    Aug 28, 2017 0
  • 20 Aug 2017
    Flat roofing repairs, particularly in confined spaces, have long been known to cause discomfort to operatives and those living or working nearby. Fumes, odours and vapours can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea and lung irritation. They may also irritate the skin, eyes, nose and throat. These effects are usually mild and temporary. Although contractors and building occupants may experience short term problems, the fumes and vapours generally do not pose a health hazard and symptoms usually resolve within hours after exposure to the odour has ended. Most of the problems from fumes seem to relate to asphalt which contains many chemicals and studies, mostly US based, have reported that these have potential long term risks for operatives. Because of this some commentators are suggesting that this could be the beginning of the end for bitumen based products. Manufacturers of roofing materials have known about the problem for many years and have sought to develop more user friendly waterproofing system – and now it seems there has been a breakthrough which could see an end to high levels of discomfort caused by fumes and other noxious vapours. Companies such as Proteus Waterproofing are leading the way with new Cold Melt systems which are high in solids such as recycled rubber crumb and other organically grown products making them virtually fume free and totally odourless. It would also seem that quality and longevity have not been compromised as the new systems, which are PUR based, are claimed to last for the life of the building when correctly installed to the manufacturer’s specification. Nevertheless, bitumen based waterproof membranes still account for the lion’s share of the flat roofing market and we are unlikely to see a major shift to new materials in the near future. But there is clearly a detectable trend towards greener roofs which would suggest the PUR technology, although part chemical based, probably offers a good long term solution for flat roofing projects particularly in confined areas. Cold Melt system are likely to increasingly dominate the market as more is known about potential health issues, but it is probably a little too early yet to say goodbye to bitumen – but it could be the start. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/product/cold-melt/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Flat roofing repairs, particularly in confined spaces, have long been known to cause discomfort to operatives and those living or working nearby. Fumes, odours and vapours can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea and lung irritation. They may also irritate the skin, eyes, nose and throat. These effects are usually mild and temporary. Although contractors and building occupants may experience short term problems, the fumes and vapours generally do not pose a health hazard and symptoms usually resolve within hours after exposure to the odour has ended. Most of the problems from fumes seem to relate to asphalt which contains many chemicals and studies, mostly US based, have reported that these have potential long term risks for operatives. Because of this some commentators are suggesting that this could be the beginning of the end for bitumen based products. Manufacturers of roofing materials have known about the problem for many years and have sought to develop more user friendly waterproofing system – and now it seems there has been a breakthrough which could see an end to high levels of discomfort caused by fumes and other noxious vapours. Companies such as Proteus Waterproofing are leading the way with new Cold Melt systems which are high in solids such as recycled rubber crumb and other organically grown products making them virtually fume free and totally odourless. It would also seem that quality and longevity have not been compromised as the new systems, which are PUR based, are claimed to last for the life of the building when correctly installed to the manufacturer’s specification. Nevertheless, bitumen based waterproof membranes still account for the lion’s share of the flat roofing market and we are unlikely to see a major shift to new materials in the near future. But there is clearly a detectable trend towards greener roofs which would suggest the PUR technology, although part chemical based, probably offers a good long term solution for flat roofing projects particularly in confined areas. Cold Melt system are likely to increasingly dominate the market as more is known about potential health issues, but it is probably a little too early yet to say goodbye to bitumen – but it could be the start. Visit: http://proteuswaterproofing.co.uk/product/cold-melt/
    Aug 20, 2017 0
  • 27 Jul 2017
    Green roofs have long been a popular specification across Europe but are still relatively new to many in the UK construction industry. Our capital city sets the standard with more than 700 green roofs in Central London alone, but isn’t it time the rest of the country caught up and moved the concept of green roofs into mainstream consideration on all urban projects? Everybody knows that space is at a premium in our cities, with the cost of land forcing developers to build upwards and refurbishments now responsible for 40% of the construction market. And with the increasingly adverse effects of global warming, environmentally conscious clients and stringent building regulations, specifiers and contractors are looking to make their buildings as harmless, and where practical as beneficial, to the environment as possible. A popular and viable solution to the growing problems of urban heat island effect, stormwater runoff, air pollution and loss of outdoor spaces,vegetated roofs, terraces and gardens must now become a mainstream ecological construction method. Without using costly or unproven technologies, they can provide a simple way to reduce energy costs and offset the environmental impacts of construction practices with a previously unused space. The thing about roofs is that they provide space that can be utilised for the benefit of both the building and the planet. It is no longer just somewhere to stick unsightly plant and equipment; it is an area which can: reduce flooding risks, save energy, create energy, clean the air around us and provide bio-diverse habitats which will indeed benefit us all. Green roofs will also make financial sense as one of the many benefits is the fact that the life of the roof is extended. A green roof improves the thermal behaviour of the building by acting as an insulate, helping to keep the cold out in the winter and the heat out in the summer. This lowers the stresses on the roof structure as a whole and the waterproofing in particular. It is also physically protecting the waterproofing layer from damage. It can also result in the lowering of heating and air conditioning costs. So with all these benefits, why is the UK playing catch up with the rest of the world when it comes to green roofs? In reality, it probably isn’t. With over 700 already, London actually has more green roofs than most cities in Europe and the USA. But that’s only the start. With the UK’s population still on the increase and house prices back on the up, it’s highly likely that for the roofing market – the future’s green. Visit: http://www.icb.uk.com/  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Green roofs have long been a popular specification across Europe but are still relatively new to many in the UK construction industry. Our capital city sets the standard with more than 700 green roofs in Central London alone, but isn’t it time the rest of the country caught up and moved the concept of green roofs into mainstream consideration on all urban projects? Everybody knows that space is at a premium in our cities, with the cost of land forcing developers to build upwards and refurbishments now responsible for 40% of the construction market. And with the increasingly adverse effects of global warming, environmentally conscious clients and stringent building regulations, specifiers and contractors are looking to make their buildings as harmless, and where practical as beneficial, to the environment as possible. A popular and viable solution to the growing problems of urban heat island effect, stormwater runoff, air pollution and loss of outdoor spaces,vegetated roofs, terraces and gardens must now become a mainstream ecological construction method. Without using costly or unproven technologies, they can provide a simple way to reduce energy costs and offset the environmental impacts of construction practices with a previously unused space. The thing about roofs is that they provide space that can be utilised for the benefit of both the building and the planet. It is no longer just somewhere to stick unsightly plant and equipment; it is an area which can: reduce flooding risks, save energy, create energy, clean the air around us and provide bio-diverse habitats which will indeed benefit us all. Green roofs will also make financial sense as one of the many benefits is the fact that the life of the roof is extended. A green roof improves the thermal behaviour of the building by acting as an insulate, helping to keep the cold out in the winter and the heat out in the summer. This lowers the stresses on the roof structure as a whole and the waterproofing in particular. It is also physically protecting the waterproofing layer from damage. It can also result in the lowering of heating and air conditioning costs. So with all these benefits, why is the UK playing catch up with the rest of the world when it comes to green roofs? In reality, it probably isn’t. With over 700 already, London actually has more green roofs than most cities in Europe and the USA. But that’s only the start. With the UK’s population still on the increase and house prices back on the up, it’s highly likely that for the roofing market – the future’s green. Visit: http://www.icb.uk.com/  
    Jul 27, 2017 0
  • 11 Jul 2017
    Assurances given in terms to the longevity of single ply products are not always as black and white as they first appear. This is because while the majority of manufacturers can produce statements of their products’ life expectancies or design lives via accelerated testing, it is sometimes the case that these timescales are longer than the time a manufacturer has actually been operating in the UK. For some this situation may be acceptable. Others require ‘real’ evidence of performance when choosing the right roofing product as they recognise that a roof is the most important element in securing a building’s long-term endurance. We’re fortunate that we can show a client, architect or surveyor that what has been tested in theory has also been proven and confirmed in reality. Trocal entered the UK market in 1972 but the company’s history prior to this point and its connection to one of the most infamous inventors of the 19th Century still remains relatively unknown by many of our UK customers. Trocal can be traced back to Alfred Nobel, who founded Alfred Nobel & Co (later known as Dynamit Nobel AG), a chemical company involved in the production of weaponry in Troisdorf, Germany, 1865. Nobel’s place in history was secured through the invention of Dynamite in 1867 and the establishment of the Nobel Peace Prize some 30 years later – which occurred despite the apparent contradiction in terms! After the First World War, the company turned its attention to chemical-based products involving ‘plastics', with the first fully synthetic plastic launched in 1934. In 1962 the first Trocal single ply roofing membrane was launched and this would be the springboard to the UK in the early 70s and achieving its first BBA certificate in 1975. In 1979 Trocal went onto be the founding member of the Flat Roofing Association (FRA) which would later become todays governing body for the single ply industry, the Single Ply Roofing Association (SPRA). In late 2015, in Trocal’s 43rd year in business in the UK, we decided to improve our British Board of Agrément certification statement on the life expectancy of our membranes, which at the time stood at 30 years. We set ourselves the goal of increasing this to “in excess of 35 years” but to do so we needed to provide a sample of an existing Trocal membrane that could perform to this requirement. Thankfully, Sika-Trocal has been a leading supplier of Single Ply and have had millions of m2 installed over the years and one client, Fossil (UK) Ltd, had a Trocal membrane installed on their headquarters in Milton Keynes in 1981, which had enjoyed 35 reliable, trouble free years. The sample provided of the existing membrane demonstrated very similar flexibility and constitution performance to a brand new membrane and this helped Sika-Trocal have its membrane life span extended to “in excess of 35 years” by the BBA. And the rest they say is history. By Andy Lockwood, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Assurances given in terms to the longevity of single ply products are not always as black and white as they first appear. This is because while the majority of manufacturers can produce statements of their products’ life expectancies or design lives via accelerated testing, it is sometimes the case that these timescales are longer than the time a manufacturer has actually been operating in the UK. For some this situation may be acceptable. Others require ‘real’ evidence of performance when choosing the right roofing product as they recognise that a roof is the most important element in securing a building’s long-term endurance. We’re fortunate that we can show a client, architect or surveyor that what has been tested in theory has also been proven and confirmed in reality. Trocal entered the UK market in 1972 but the company’s history prior to this point and its connection to one of the most infamous inventors of the 19th Century still remains relatively unknown by many of our UK customers. Trocal can be traced back to Alfred Nobel, who founded Alfred Nobel & Co (later known as Dynamit Nobel AG), a chemical company involved in the production of weaponry in Troisdorf, Germany, 1865. Nobel’s place in history was secured through the invention of Dynamite in 1867 and the establishment of the Nobel Peace Prize some 30 years later – which occurred despite the apparent contradiction in terms! After the First World War, the company turned its attention to chemical-based products involving ‘plastics', with the first fully synthetic plastic launched in 1934. In 1962 the first Trocal single ply roofing membrane was launched and this would be the springboard to the UK in the early 70s and achieving its first BBA certificate in 1975. In 1979 Trocal went onto be the founding member of the Flat Roofing Association (FRA) which would later become todays governing body for the single ply industry, the Single Ply Roofing Association (SPRA). In late 2015, in Trocal’s 43rd year in business in the UK, we decided to improve our British Board of Agrément certification statement on the life expectancy of our membranes, which at the time stood at 30 years. We set ourselves the goal of increasing this to “in excess of 35 years” but to do so we needed to provide a sample of an existing Trocal membrane that could perform to this requirement. Thankfully, Sika-Trocal has been a leading supplier of Single Ply and have had millions of m2 installed over the years and one client, Fossil (UK) Ltd, had a Trocal membrane installed on their headquarters in Milton Keynes in 1981, which had enjoyed 35 reliable, trouble free years. The sample provided of the existing membrane demonstrated very similar flexibility and constitution performance to a brand new membrane and this helped Sika-Trocal have its membrane life span extended to “in excess of 35 years” by the BBA. And the rest they say is history. By Andy Lockwood, Area Technical Manager at Sika-Trocal  
    Jul 11, 2017 0