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  • 22 May 2018
    Mastic asphalt is a waterproofing material that has really stood the test of ages. Some say it was used by Noah to waterproof the Ark and there is considerable evidence to show that it has been used since ancient times. Most architects would say they know everything there is to know about mastic asphalt and many probably regard it as a bit old fashioned when compared to many so called alternatives. But they would be wrong because mastic asphalt still remains full of surprises and one company Bell Asphalte based in Bexley, Kent, is turning a few heads, especially with specifiers with a new kind of “Terrazzo” flooring and paving. It uses mastic asphalt as its base material mixed with stone chippings to produce a magnificent affect which is marketed as Merazzo to reflect the distinctive look of traditional Italian flooring and paving, at a highly affordable price. Slip resistant, seamless and available in a wide range of colours and finishes, Merazzo offers infinite design possibilities and applications and is already being specified and installed on a wide variety of projects. It is produced in one of five distinctive colours, black, red, grey, beige or brown and is completed by a choice of stone chippings, also available in a wide range of different colours. The Merazzo floor or paving is then installed and finished to the correct specification - either highly polished, matt, smooth or simply rough. Merazzo is a decorative floor which means it can be easily used in shopping malls, schools or hospitals offering years of trouble free service. Its high strength and durability means that Merazzo is equally suitable for outdoor roads, car parks and pavements. Without doubt it is the biggest innovation for mastic asphalt in – well – thousands of years and well worth checking out. Visit: http://www.bellasphalt.com/ See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRJP8194Lzw
    85 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Mastic asphalt is a waterproofing material that has really stood the test of ages. Some say it was used by Noah to waterproof the Ark and there is considerable evidence to show that it has been used since ancient times. Most architects would say they know everything there is to know about mastic asphalt and many probably regard it as a bit old fashioned when compared to many so called alternatives. But they would be wrong because mastic asphalt still remains full of surprises and one company Bell Asphalte based in Bexley, Kent, is turning a few heads, especially with specifiers with a new kind of “Terrazzo” flooring and paving. It uses mastic asphalt as its base material mixed with stone chippings to produce a magnificent affect which is marketed as Merazzo to reflect the distinctive look of traditional Italian flooring and paving, at a highly affordable price. Slip resistant, seamless and available in a wide range of colours and finishes, Merazzo offers infinite design possibilities and applications and is already being specified and installed on a wide variety of projects. It is produced in one of five distinctive colours, black, red, grey, beige or brown and is completed by a choice of stone chippings, also available in a wide range of different colours. The Merazzo floor or paving is then installed and finished to the correct specification - either highly polished, matt, smooth or simply rough. Merazzo is a decorative floor which means it can be easily used in shopping malls, schools or hospitals offering years of trouble free service. Its high strength and durability means that Merazzo is equally suitable for outdoor roads, car parks and pavements. Without doubt it is the biggest innovation for mastic asphalt in – well – thousands of years and well worth checking out. Visit: http://www.bellasphalt.com/ See video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRJP8194Lzw
    May 22, 2018 85
  • 18 May 2018
    What makes a great working space? Must it increase individual and group productivity or does it need to improve employee wellbeing? How do spaces strike a balance between private and open areas? All of these factors are important considerations when creating a positive, working environment. The current concern, however, is whether we can have visual privacy without compromising natural light. Natural sources of light maintain a healthy mind and disposition, making for a happy environment. Daylight has been found to be the number one wanted natural feature in the workplace. For this reason, workplaces are facing increasing demands to have open spaces which encourage light flow and prevent darkness. However, in busy offices large expanses aren’t always practical when it comes to managing acoustic and visual privacy levels. In essence the question is: how can natural light be utilised effectively when privacy is also a demand? The following solutions will offer some insight into how visual and acoustic privacy can be attained without losing light. Glass Partitions Double and single glazed partitions allow natural sources of light to pass through whilst maintaining privacy in the workplace. Not only can the glass partitions manage acoustics, they create private areas which encourage natural streams of light throughout the space. Get Creative Visual privacy can be achieved through a design which is manifested over a series of glass partitions. Whether it’s an applied film or a decorative interlayer, these designs not only look aesthetically pleasing, they control the amount of natural light in private spaces. The manifestation gives designers a chance to inject some creativity into the scheme whilst also ensuring natural light is maximised within the space. Go Technical In cases where lighting is important, Tech Panels are a great solution to control lighting levels in rooms. Tech Panels are an efficient way to manage ambient lighting where visual and acoustic privacy outweigh the need for natural light. The panels house various types of technology like air conditioning controls and room booking systems.  Switch It Some work spaces promote the flow of natural daylight but need to provide visual privacy on occasion. Switchable glass can provide visual privacy at the flick of a switch, turning the glass opaque. When you’ve finished just switch back, the glass goes clear and the flow of natural light is resumed.  Natural light improves mood, reduces stress and positively impacts circadian system functioning. Where better to employ the best use of natural light than in a hospital environment. The clever use of blinds within the glass cavity promotes the flow of light but also creates a private space when the blinds are closed.  Re-Plan Your Space Demountable walls offer more versatility as companies can manage the changing needs of the workforce. As visual and acoustic privacy needs develop and the workforce changes, workspaces can be adapted. Not only is this a cost effective solution but it’s also environmentally friendly. There are many solutions to ensuring the natural flow of light is maximised within private spaces. Find the right glass partition for the right space; get creative, reduce stress and enjoy the positive results on your happy workforce. Visit: https://optimasystems.com
    84 Posted by Talk. Build
  • What makes a great working space? Must it increase individual and group productivity or does it need to improve employee wellbeing? How do spaces strike a balance between private and open areas? All of these factors are important considerations when creating a positive, working environment. The current concern, however, is whether we can have visual privacy without compromising natural light. Natural sources of light maintain a healthy mind and disposition, making for a happy environment. Daylight has been found to be the number one wanted natural feature in the workplace. For this reason, workplaces are facing increasing demands to have open spaces which encourage light flow and prevent darkness. However, in busy offices large expanses aren’t always practical when it comes to managing acoustic and visual privacy levels. In essence the question is: how can natural light be utilised effectively when privacy is also a demand? The following solutions will offer some insight into how visual and acoustic privacy can be attained without losing light. Glass Partitions Double and single glazed partitions allow natural sources of light to pass through whilst maintaining privacy in the workplace. Not only can the glass partitions manage acoustics, they create private areas which encourage natural streams of light throughout the space. Get Creative Visual privacy can be achieved through a design which is manifested over a series of glass partitions. Whether it’s an applied film or a decorative interlayer, these designs not only look aesthetically pleasing, they control the amount of natural light in private spaces. The manifestation gives designers a chance to inject some creativity into the scheme whilst also ensuring natural light is maximised within the space. Go Technical In cases where lighting is important, Tech Panels are a great solution to control lighting levels in rooms. Tech Panels are an efficient way to manage ambient lighting where visual and acoustic privacy outweigh the need for natural light. The panels house various types of technology like air conditioning controls and room booking systems.  Switch It Some work spaces promote the flow of natural daylight but need to provide visual privacy on occasion. Switchable glass can provide visual privacy at the flick of a switch, turning the glass opaque. When you’ve finished just switch back, the glass goes clear and the flow of natural light is resumed.  Natural light improves mood, reduces stress and positively impacts circadian system functioning. Where better to employ the best use of natural light than in a hospital environment. The clever use of blinds within the glass cavity promotes the flow of light but also creates a private space when the blinds are closed.  Re-Plan Your Space Demountable walls offer more versatility as companies can manage the changing needs of the workforce. As visual and acoustic privacy needs develop and the workforce changes, workspaces can be adapted. Not only is this a cost effective solution but it’s also environmentally friendly. There are many solutions to ensuring the natural flow of light is maximised within private spaces. Find the right glass partition for the right space; get creative, reduce stress and enjoy the positive results on your happy workforce. Visit: https://optimasystems.com
    May 18, 2018 84
  • 16 May 2018
    From their design to their hygiene, washrooms must be maintained regularly to make sure students feel comfortable using the services. Even a loose or a broken toilet door lock could compromise a child’s education; if a child feels as if he or she cannot use a facility comfortably, they may well return to a class unrelaxed, unfocussed and not in the best mind-set for learning. It is striking and even surprising to see how seemingly minor concerns such as toilet door locks have a negative effect on a child’s education and state of mind. Wellbeing is becoming more prominent in discussions on students mental and physical health; schools not only have a responsibility to educate, they must cultivate safe spaces for young people in the key stages of personal and individual development. Each area of a school building must be maintained to a standard which ensures a child’s education and wellbeing is not compromised, where their comfort should be of fundamental concern to school staff and the wider education sector at large. On the surface of things, it seems hard to envision why unequipped toilets could impact a child’s education and wellbeing. But if a child uses a toilet facility which does not have any soap, and then let’s say for some reason falls ill, then they will miss crucial learning time in the classroom. Maintaining clean and efficient toilets curbs absenteeism as children are healthy enough to attend lessons. But the argument does not just revolve around physical health, as mental health and wellbeing is a chief concern for school staff. If a washroom is not maintained appropriately, students will feel anxious using them, resulting in a decreased-attention span whilst at school. Whether it is lack of soap, broken toilet seats, or cracked mirrors, it is important to take into account these factors to address the broader concern of how it might impact a child’s frame of mind. More responsibility must be taken to improve toilet facilities in school environments, in order to increase student wellbeing, health and productivity. Schools must also shift their perspectives towards small concerns such as these as they will improve the school’s larger function. At the moment, poorly facilitated toilets are affecting attendance and wellbeing, thereby threatening the overall performance of a school. By shifting perspectives and taking more accountability when it comes to the state of school washrooms, we might enhance students’ wellbeing and find solutions to prevent absenteeism. Visit: https://www.interfixgroup.com
    103 Posted by Talk. Build
  • From their design to their hygiene, washrooms must be maintained regularly to make sure students feel comfortable using the services. Even a loose or a broken toilet door lock could compromise a child’s education; if a child feels as if he or she cannot use a facility comfortably, they may well return to a class unrelaxed, unfocussed and not in the best mind-set for learning. It is striking and even surprising to see how seemingly minor concerns such as toilet door locks have a negative effect on a child’s education and state of mind. Wellbeing is becoming more prominent in discussions on students mental and physical health; schools not only have a responsibility to educate, they must cultivate safe spaces for young people in the key stages of personal and individual development. Each area of a school building must be maintained to a standard which ensures a child’s education and wellbeing is not compromised, where their comfort should be of fundamental concern to school staff and the wider education sector at large. On the surface of things, it seems hard to envision why unequipped toilets could impact a child’s education and wellbeing. But if a child uses a toilet facility which does not have any soap, and then let’s say for some reason falls ill, then they will miss crucial learning time in the classroom. Maintaining clean and efficient toilets curbs absenteeism as children are healthy enough to attend lessons. But the argument does not just revolve around physical health, as mental health and wellbeing is a chief concern for school staff. If a washroom is not maintained appropriately, students will feel anxious using them, resulting in a decreased-attention span whilst at school. Whether it is lack of soap, broken toilet seats, or cracked mirrors, it is important to take into account these factors to address the broader concern of how it might impact a child’s frame of mind. More responsibility must be taken to improve toilet facilities in school environments, in order to increase student wellbeing, health and productivity. Schools must also shift their perspectives towards small concerns such as these as they will improve the school’s larger function. At the moment, poorly facilitated toilets are affecting attendance and wellbeing, thereby threatening the overall performance of a school. By shifting perspectives and taking more accountability when it comes to the state of school washrooms, we might enhance students’ wellbeing and find solutions to prevent absenteeism. Visit: https://www.interfixgroup.com
    May 16, 2018 103
  • 14 May 2018
    There is no denying that the specification of metal ceilings has seen huge growth over the past 30 years. Metal is now the go-to ceiling material, superseding mineral fibre as the mainstay of modern workplace and infrastructure projects. An indispensable tool in the architect’s design arsenal, metal is a cost-effective and desirable material meeting contemporary interior demands. Metal creates visual impact, provides essential acoustic control and allows specifiers to add drama and confidence to an interior. So what is the secret to metal’s desirability and popularity as a ceiling material? Buildings sympathetic to the changing needs of occupiers is increasingly key. The rise of open plan offices with diverse, agile and collaborative spaces is the new norm. This requires designers to pioneer solutions that meet these changing occupier demands. As a reflective material, specifying a metal ceiling might seem counterintuitive for effective acoustic control. However, they provide excellent acoustic regulation, controlling reverberance and occupational noise. The level of acoustic absorption required will depend on the size of space, materials used and occupier density. A range of acoustic infill panels combined with appropriate perforations will effectively control unwanted noise in the majority of spaces. Depending on performance demands, metal ceilings will typically offer the benchmark ‘Class A’ acoustic absorption. Design flexibility In today’s changing spaces, manufacturers have had to develop multi-functional, yet beautiful solutions. Metal ceiling systems allow the designer curved, waveform, trapezoidal and even multi-faceted options. Transition and perimeter trims also offer the advantage of specifying different metal systems within one coherent and integrated design. In addition, metal ceilings can now incorporate a wide range of finishes and effects. Another advantage of metal ceilings is they work flexibly with partitioning allowing occupiers to rethink space. As traditional working practices change, the ability to adapt spaces cost-effectively is increasingly attractive. Maintenance and Durability A long-term investment for any project, metal maintains its appearance considerably longer than lower quality ceiling materials. Metal ceilings are impervious to many of the common factors you would associate with ceiling degradation. For example, a non-porous material, metal does not suffer from increased loading, sagging or unsightly stains from burst water pipes. Neither will dust and grime permeate the surface. This robust, hardwearing material maintains its appearance, offers ease of maintenance and full access to ceiling voids. Sustainability Steel and aluminium are the most widely recycled and reused materials in construction, the benchmark for waste reduction. These highly sustainable materials can be 100% recycled and re-used repeatedly without degradation of quality. Value A recent report by SAS International considered the long-term value of metal over other ceiling materials. When considering the increased life expectancy and ease of maintenance, metal demonstrated a 47% cost saving over a 20-year period. Service Integration Ceilings often combine with or discretely hide otherwise unsightly M&E services. Metal has always been an ideal material to integrate lighting and other services within a considered and functioning design. As part of a fire protection system*, metal ceilings can also accommodate additional services such as sprinklers and smoke detectors. However, as we move closer and closer to more intelligent and smarter buildings, the possibilities of integrating technology are endless. The world’s most sustainable office Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. Sustainability was an overarching objective for Michael Bloomberg from day one. He insisted on a considerate design from an architectural and performance perspective. For SAS’ Special Projects team - which oversaw the design, manufacture and eventual installation of the scheme onsite - this was a truly collaborative project and one that saw the company deliver 24,000m2 of SAS product. The stunning petal-shaped ceiling is aesthetically striking and plays a significant part in a building that pushes the boundaries of sustainability. In total, 3,916 Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) were manufactured and installed with an impressive 2.5 million petals attached to them. The petal shape is not just an architectural feature; it has been optimised by specialist software modelling to give the best possible acoustic, thermal and light reflecting performance. The sculpted shape maximises surface area to improve heat exchange and optimises airflow to maximise convection. The slots allow air to pass through, which also improves performance. In short, and from a temperature control perspective, the design exceeds Category A Thermal comfort, the highest level achievable for an office. In terms of lighting, the role that LED lighting takes is a lesson in efficiency and sustainable design. The ICPs feature 500,000 LED lights and use 40% less energy than a typical office design. Due to the number of LEDs used, they run significantly below maximum output for the required light levels. They are even more efficient when cooled and operate with an increased life expectancy. The cumulative effect is an incredibly efficient design, consuming significantly less energy than is typical in office space. Acoustically, the design of the metal ceiling performs exceptionally well. The slotted petals and the perforations mean that the surface is sufficiently open to allow enough sound to come through to the mineral wool behind. Tested to Class A absorption levels, the ceiling impressively and precisely manages acoustic reverberation across the open plan offices. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." When it comes to metal as a material for ceilings there are virtually no limits to what can be achieved; it is possible to turn an imaginative concept into a colourful and truly inspired design. By working closely with leading manufacturers such as SAS International, there is an opportunity to bring an architect’s vision to reality. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/ * It is not recommended that a suspended ceiling be relied upon to protect the structural elements of a building. Metal ceiling systems should be tested and certified in accordance with UK and European standards.  
    121 Posted by Talk. Build
  • There is no denying that the specification of metal ceilings has seen huge growth over the past 30 years. Metal is now the go-to ceiling material, superseding mineral fibre as the mainstay of modern workplace and infrastructure projects. An indispensable tool in the architect’s design arsenal, metal is a cost-effective and desirable material meeting contemporary interior demands. Metal creates visual impact, provides essential acoustic control and allows specifiers to add drama and confidence to an interior. So what is the secret to metal’s desirability and popularity as a ceiling material? Buildings sympathetic to the changing needs of occupiers is increasingly key. The rise of open plan offices with diverse, agile and collaborative spaces is the new norm. This requires designers to pioneer solutions that meet these changing occupier demands. As a reflective material, specifying a metal ceiling might seem counterintuitive for effective acoustic control. However, they provide excellent acoustic regulation, controlling reverberance and occupational noise. The level of acoustic absorption required will depend on the size of space, materials used and occupier density. A range of acoustic infill panels combined with appropriate perforations will effectively control unwanted noise in the majority of spaces. Depending on performance demands, metal ceilings will typically offer the benchmark ‘Class A’ acoustic absorption. Design flexibility In today’s changing spaces, manufacturers have had to develop multi-functional, yet beautiful solutions. Metal ceiling systems allow the designer curved, waveform, trapezoidal and even multi-faceted options. Transition and perimeter trims also offer the advantage of specifying different metal systems within one coherent and integrated design. In addition, metal ceilings can now incorporate a wide range of finishes and effects. Another advantage of metal ceilings is they work flexibly with partitioning allowing occupiers to rethink space. As traditional working practices change, the ability to adapt spaces cost-effectively is increasingly attractive. Maintenance and Durability A long-term investment for any project, metal maintains its appearance considerably longer than lower quality ceiling materials. Metal ceilings are impervious to many of the common factors you would associate with ceiling degradation. For example, a non-porous material, metal does not suffer from increased loading, sagging or unsightly stains from burst water pipes. Neither will dust and grime permeate the surface. This robust, hardwearing material maintains its appearance, offers ease of maintenance and full access to ceiling voids. Sustainability Steel and aluminium are the most widely recycled and reused materials in construction, the benchmark for waste reduction. These highly sustainable materials can be 100% recycled and re-used repeatedly without degradation of quality. Value A recent report by SAS International considered the long-term value of metal over other ceiling materials. When considering the increased life expectancy and ease of maintenance, metal demonstrated a 47% cost saving over a 20-year period. Service Integration Ceilings often combine with or discretely hide otherwise unsightly M&E services. Metal has always been an ideal material to integrate lighting and other services within a considered and functioning design. As part of a fire protection system*, metal ceilings can also accommodate additional services such as sprinklers and smoke detectors. However, as we move closer and closer to more intelligent and smarter buildings, the possibilities of integrating technology are endless. The world’s most sustainable office Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. Sustainability was an overarching objective for Michael Bloomberg from day one. He insisted on a considerate design from an architectural and performance perspective. For SAS’ Special Projects team - which oversaw the design, manufacture and eventual installation of the scheme onsite - this was a truly collaborative project and one that saw the company deliver 24,000m2 of SAS product. The stunning petal-shaped ceiling is aesthetically striking and plays a significant part in a building that pushes the boundaries of sustainability. In total, 3,916 Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) were manufactured and installed with an impressive 2.5 million petals attached to them. The petal shape is not just an architectural feature; it has been optimised by specialist software modelling to give the best possible acoustic, thermal and light reflecting performance. The sculpted shape maximises surface area to improve heat exchange and optimises airflow to maximise convection. The slots allow air to pass through, which also improves performance. In short, and from a temperature control perspective, the design exceeds Category A Thermal comfort, the highest level achievable for an office. In terms of lighting, the role that LED lighting takes is a lesson in efficiency and sustainable design. The ICPs feature 500,000 LED lights and use 40% less energy than a typical office design. Due to the number of LEDs used, they run significantly below maximum output for the required light levels. They are even more efficient when cooled and operate with an increased life expectancy. The cumulative effect is an incredibly efficient design, consuming significantly less energy than is typical in office space. Acoustically, the design of the metal ceiling performs exceptionally well. The slotted petals and the perforations mean that the surface is sufficiently open to allow enough sound to come through to the mineral wool behind. Tested to Class A absorption levels, the ceiling impressively and precisely manages acoustic reverberation across the open plan offices. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." Metal allows architects the freedom to work in a material that offers performance and durability alongside aesthetics. However, it allows for far more than this. For example, take the petal leaf ceiling in the Foster + Partners designed Bloomberg building – the world’s most sustainable office. The Integrated Ceiling Panels (ICPs) combine acoustics, lighting and ambient temperature control. This played a crucial part in the building achieving a BREEAM Outstanding rating. The ceiling is a first for the UK, if not globally, and unlikely to be achieved in any other material. Commenting on the project, Foster + Partners’ Michael Jones said: "Without the ceiling the sustainability wouldn't be what it is." When it comes to metal as a material for ceilings there are virtually no limits to what can be achieved; it is possible to turn an imaginative concept into a colourful and truly inspired design. By working closely with leading manufacturers such as SAS International, there is an opportunity to bring an architect’s vision to reality. Visit: https://sasintgroup.com/ * It is not recommended that a suspended ceiling be relied upon to protect the structural elements of a building. Metal ceiling systems should be tested and certified in accordance with UK and European standards.  
    May 14, 2018 121
  • 10 May 2018
    In an ever-changing world of design and our eager desire for the latest products, we often find ourselves reaching for the latest trends and fashions.  Believe it or not, this is also very much the case in the world of rooflights. The want for new, sleek, modern-looking products is forever something that rooflight manufacturers seek to provide and serve. This is particularly the case when it comes to the choice of glazing with many different options, colours and versatilities available from polycarbonate to GRP to glass. It is commonplace on existing and new builds to find daylight beaming into a building, the benefits of which have been reported widely for many years, particularly in the world of health and education.  While the health, productivity and wellbeing benefits remain, the trends change. Glass has become very prominent within today’s wants and designs, and has become a trendsetter across the rooflight industry.  Many options exist from Flat Glass Rooflights, Curved Glass, Mono Pitches, Dual Pitches and Atria. Designability When glass is combined with a quality rooflight system it can look exceptional, work well, be energy efficient as well as offering a whole host of additional features and benefits.  From stunning, jaw-dropping architectural masterpieces snaking their way across a roof to huge atria systems which catch your eye the moment you are beneath them; to the more commonplace flat glass and modular systems available, glass rooflights play a major part in contemporary architecture. Designed to meet a myriad of project requirements, glass rooflights offer versatility so it’s imperative that specifiers look at the options available to assess the most appropriate product for a project. When looking around for your best solution it is vital to look at all factors or noted ‘benefits’ of the product including thermally broken frames, U-values, acoustic performance and even self-cleaning glass. It’s also vital to consider the safety issue.  Many of us spend time, often without actually realising it, standing beneath or working on a roof within the vicinity of glass. Glass rooflights may look the same to the untrained eye but there can be stark differences between the costs of these units. There is usually a good reason for this and more often than not, if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find significant differences in the glazing specification, which makes big differences to both thermal performance and safety. The most economic solution is often not the best, or as efficient as you first thought. Safety first When assessing the options available and whilst trying to find the best product at the best price, it’s important to take time to understand the following: glass rooflights should always be specified to consider the safety of both building users beneath the rooflights, and anyone above who may inadvertently step and fall onto the rooflight. Industry regulatory guidance (for example see NARM Glass specification guide, at http://www.narm.org.uk/products/glass/specific-guide states that all glass rooflights should have a laminated inner pane to minimise risk of any glass falling into the room if the inner pane should break, even though BS5516 does set out certain circumstances/locations when a toughened inner pane can be used, subject to satisfactory risk assessment. In addition to using a laminated inner pane to protect building users, rooflights can be specified and designed to be non-fragile to CWCT Technical Note 92, and ACR[M]001. This is intended to ensure the safety of anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight and to ensure that anyone accidentally walking or falling onto the rooflight will not fall through, even if the glass is broken or the rooflight is damaged.  The preferred specification should always be for rooflights which are both non-fragile and which have a laminated inner pane, protecting both anyone beneath the rooflight and anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight. Across the industry, there is now an infinite variety of rooflight shapes, sizes and glazing options to suit flat, pitched and curved roof applications, whether it is a small dome-light in a domestic kitchen or polycarbonate and GRP sheeting used in stadium canopy applications. To summarise, choose a rooflight manufacturer that provides a great looking product at a reasonable price and one that can back up and support their claims of performance and service. This might appear to be a time consuming exercise, but this is far outweighed by the safe and long-lasting benefits of a great product. Through the synergy between rooflight manufacturers and specifiers working together, it is possible to design, produce and achieve some of the most beautiful ‘daylight enhancements’ ever dreamt of on a building.  Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com/
    107 Posted by Talk. Build
  • In an ever-changing world of design and our eager desire for the latest products, we often find ourselves reaching for the latest trends and fashions.  Believe it or not, this is also very much the case in the world of rooflights. The want for new, sleek, modern-looking products is forever something that rooflight manufacturers seek to provide and serve. This is particularly the case when it comes to the choice of glazing with many different options, colours and versatilities available from polycarbonate to GRP to glass. It is commonplace on existing and new builds to find daylight beaming into a building, the benefits of which have been reported widely for many years, particularly in the world of health and education.  While the health, productivity and wellbeing benefits remain, the trends change. Glass has become very prominent within today’s wants and designs, and has become a trendsetter across the rooflight industry.  Many options exist from Flat Glass Rooflights, Curved Glass, Mono Pitches, Dual Pitches and Atria. Designability When glass is combined with a quality rooflight system it can look exceptional, work well, be energy efficient as well as offering a whole host of additional features and benefits.  From stunning, jaw-dropping architectural masterpieces snaking their way across a roof to huge atria systems which catch your eye the moment you are beneath them; to the more commonplace flat glass and modular systems available, glass rooflights play a major part in contemporary architecture. Designed to meet a myriad of project requirements, glass rooflights offer versatility so it’s imperative that specifiers look at the options available to assess the most appropriate product for a project. When looking around for your best solution it is vital to look at all factors or noted ‘benefits’ of the product including thermally broken frames, U-values, acoustic performance and even self-cleaning glass. It’s also vital to consider the safety issue.  Many of us spend time, often without actually realising it, standing beneath or working on a roof within the vicinity of glass. Glass rooflights may look the same to the untrained eye but there can be stark differences between the costs of these units. There is usually a good reason for this and more often than not, if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find significant differences in the glazing specification, which makes big differences to both thermal performance and safety. The most economic solution is often not the best, or as efficient as you first thought. Safety first When assessing the options available and whilst trying to find the best product at the best price, it’s important to take time to understand the following: glass rooflights should always be specified to consider the safety of both building users beneath the rooflights, and anyone above who may inadvertently step and fall onto the rooflight. Industry regulatory guidance (for example see NARM Glass specification guide, at http://www.narm.org.uk/products/glass/specific-guide states that all glass rooflights should have a laminated inner pane to minimise risk of any glass falling into the room if the inner pane should break, even though BS5516 does set out certain circumstances/locations when a toughened inner pane can be used, subject to satisfactory risk assessment. In addition to using a laminated inner pane to protect building users, rooflights can be specified and designed to be non-fragile to CWCT Technical Note 92, and ACR[M]001. This is intended to ensure the safety of anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight and to ensure that anyone accidentally walking or falling onto the rooflight will not fall through, even if the glass is broken or the rooflight is damaged.  The preferred specification should always be for rooflights which are both non-fragile and which have a laminated inner pane, protecting both anyone beneath the rooflight and anyone on the roof in the vicinity of the rooflight. Across the industry, there is now an infinite variety of rooflight shapes, sizes and glazing options to suit flat, pitched and curved roof applications, whether it is a small dome-light in a domestic kitchen or polycarbonate and GRP sheeting used in stadium canopy applications. To summarise, choose a rooflight manufacturer that provides a great looking product at a reasonable price and one that can back up and support their claims of performance and service. This might appear to be a time consuming exercise, but this is far outweighed by the safe and long-lasting benefits of a great product. Through the synergy between rooflight manufacturers and specifiers working together, it is possible to design, produce and achieve some of the most beautiful ‘daylight enhancements’ ever dreamt of on a building.  Visit: http://www.brettmartin.com/
    May 10, 2018 107
  • 09 May 2018
    Which came first – the chicken or the egg? Who would have thought the age-old question would apply to construction material selection, but it certainly is relevant for contractors working on projects pursuing Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) version 4 (v4) certification writes Tommy Linstroth, founder and CEO of Green Badger. LEED is the predominate green building certification in the US and is required on most federally funded projects as well as many state, local and university projects. Odds are, if you’re a contractor who does any public work, you’re faced with LEED certification (it also often required in the private sector, with 80+% of Fortune 100 companies requiring it). While many contractors are familiar with the requirements of the older version of LEED, Version 4 (which became mandatory for projects registered last year and new) is a whole new challenge – specifically, the availability of compliant materials. So back to the chicken or the egg - in the case of LEED v4 and the materials market – the answer is abundantly clear. LEED v4 came much sooner than manufacturers and project teams were ready for. To earn the credits in v4, products must now have Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) or Health Product Declarations (HPDs). There are other contributing certifications, but these two are the most recognizable. The challenge is there aren’t all that many products that have either one. The process for a manufacturer to generate an EPD could take over a year – so even those jumping on board today won’t have products that comply until 2019. So where can contractors look to find products that meet the criteria? First, let’s talk about what they need. To earn the credits, contractors need to use 20 products with EPDs, and/or 20 products with HPDs (there are 2 separate credits available, one for each). To make it even more complicated, EPDs come in two versions – industry wide, which only count as ½ a product, or product specific, which count in full. Industry wide means any product in that category complies, regardless of manufacturer. For example, Type X Gypsum board has an industry-wide EPD – any type X gypsum board from a manufacturer who is a member of the North American Gypsum Association can utilize that industry-wide EPD. While it only counts for ½, it is a broad enough certification that you can start to find a lot of products with it. Product specific, on the other hand, is an EPD for a specific product from a certain manufacturer – i.e ½” Fire Rated Gypsum Board from ABC Co – and counts in full. Between the two, contractors need to get a total of at least twenty to earn the point (this could be 10 industry-wide, and 15 product specific, or any combination of, etc). That still bodes the question – of the thousands of products and components that make up a building being constructed, where can contractors narrow their search for compliant products? Below are some categories of products contractors can start with before they dive down rabbit holes to find an EPD or HPD.  WOOD Most wood in North America will fall under the American Wood Council’s Industry Wide EPDs (that only count as a half-point each), but include softwood plywood, softwood lumber, OSB, LVLs, Glu-Lam timbers, I-joists, MDF, and particle board. You can easily pick up a handful of those w/o much work. Huber’s popular ZIP, Advantech an TruSpec products all have Product Specific Type 3 EPDs as well. WALLS, CEILING TILES AND GRID One of the most robust categories, Armstrong, CertainTeed and USG all offer a host of options with EPDs, HPDs and other Material Ingredient Reporting. Since you can use up to 5 products per manufacturer, if you are savvy, you can get a quarter of your EPD and MIR accounted for just in your ceilings. National Gypsum has over a dozen products with HPDs, and there is an industry-wide EPD for Type X Gyp Board. INSULATION Insulation is another opportunity to get multiple products within the same manufacturer. While the choices are somewhat limited, CertainTeed and Knauff both offer thermal, acoustical, and mechanical insulation products with EPDs (and some with HPDs) FLOORING Flooring is the mother lode of EPDs and HPDs. Contractors could probably find all twenty products for each credit in this category alone, with products that include carpet, tile, VCT, linoleum, rubber flooring, cove base and all the associated adhesives behind them. Consider yourself in good shape with products from Armstrong, Beaulieu, Bentley Mills, Crossville, American Olean Tile, Daltile, ECORE, Emser, Forbo, Interface, Milliken, Mohawk, Patcraft and Shaw, while Laticrete, WF Taylor and XL Brands provide plenty of options to hold those products in place. ROOFING Contractors have options on top of the building almost no matter what type of roof is specified. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has industry wide EPDs for asphalt-based roofs, including mod-bit, built-up and shingles, while multiple manufacturers have EPDs for PVC membrane roofs including Carlisle, Duro-Last and GAF. PAINTS Paints have you covered (ha!) as well. Benjamin Moore, PPG, Sherwin Williams and ECOS all have a line (or more) that have EPDs and/or MIR compatibility. Also note, each sheen counts as a distinct product, so you can count a primer, flat, semi-gloss and gloss as 4 individual products for both EPDs and HPDs. METALS Products that are using structural steel or metal studs are in luck. There are industry wide EPDs for structural steel, joists, and deck, and some product specific EPDs for Rebar from Gerdeau, CMC, and Re-Steel and interior metal framing and accessories from Merino+Ware – enough to pick up another 5 products. DOORS/WINDOWS/HARDWARE This category offers an unexpected wealth of options. If your project has commercial entries/windows/storefronts, a number of options exist from YKK, Assa Abloy and Kawneer, and there are a surprising number of door hinges, locks, stoppers, openers and hardware that have EPDs from the likes of Norton, Pemko, Sargent and Schlage. While this of course is not a comprehensive list of all the products and categories that offer EPDs or HPDs, these 8 product categories are found on most commercial construction projects. Contracts can focus their efforts around these categories to not spend hundreds of hours trying to track down information on every nail and screw, and instead focus on getting their projects complete on time and on budget – while still reaching their certification goals. Visit: http://getgreenbadger.com
    129 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Which came first – the chicken or the egg? Who would have thought the age-old question would apply to construction material selection, but it certainly is relevant for contractors working on projects pursuing Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) version 4 (v4) certification writes Tommy Linstroth, founder and CEO of Green Badger. LEED is the predominate green building certification in the US and is required on most federally funded projects as well as many state, local and university projects. Odds are, if you’re a contractor who does any public work, you’re faced with LEED certification (it also often required in the private sector, with 80+% of Fortune 100 companies requiring it). While many contractors are familiar with the requirements of the older version of LEED, Version 4 (which became mandatory for projects registered last year and new) is a whole new challenge – specifically, the availability of compliant materials. So back to the chicken or the egg - in the case of LEED v4 and the materials market – the answer is abundantly clear. LEED v4 came much sooner than manufacturers and project teams were ready for. To earn the credits in v4, products must now have Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) or Health Product Declarations (HPDs). There are other contributing certifications, but these two are the most recognizable. The challenge is there aren’t all that many products that have either one. The process for a manufacturer to generate an EPD could take over a year – so even those jumping on board today won’t have products that comply until 2019. So where can contractors look to find products that meet the criteria? First, let’s talk about what they need. To earn the credits, contractors need to use 20 products with EPDs, and/or 20 products with HPDs (there are 2 separate credits available, one for each). To make it even more complicated, EPDs come in two versions – industry wide, which only count as ½ a product, or product specific, which count in full. Industry wide means any product in that category complies, regardless of manufacturer. For example, Type X Gypsum board has an industry-wide EPD – any type X gypsum board from a manufacturer who is a member of the North American Gypsum Association can utilize that industry-wide EPD. While it only counts for ½, it is a broad enough certification that you can start to find a lot of products with it. Product specific, on the other hand, is an EPD for a specific product from a certain manufacturer – i.e ½” Fire Rated Gypsum Board from ABC Co – and counts in full. Between the two, contractors need to get a total of at least twenty to earn the point (this could be 10 industry-wide, and 15 product specific, or any combination of, etc). That still bodes the question – of the thousands of products and components that make up a building being constructed, where can contractors narrow their search for compliant products? Below are some categories of products contractors can start with before they dive down rabbit holes to find an EPD or HPD.  WOOD Most wood in North America will fall under the American Wood Council’s Industry Wide EPDs (that only count as a half-point each), but include softwood plywood, softwood lumber, OSB, LVLs, Glu-Lam timbers, I-joists, MDF, and particle board. You can easily pick up a handful of those w/o much work. Huber’s popular ZIP, Advantech an TruSpec products all have Product Specific Type 3 EPDs as well. WALLS, CEILING TILES AND GRID One of the most robust categories, Armstrong, CertainTeed and USG all offer a host of options with EPDs, HPDs and other Material Ingredient Reporting. Since you can use up to 5 products per manufacturer, if you are savvy, you can get a quarter of your EPD and MIR accounted for just in your ceilings. National Gypsum has over a dozen products with HPDs, and there is an industry-wide EPD for Type X Gyp Board. INSULATION Insulation is another opportunity to get multiple products within the same manufacturer. While the choices are somewhat limited, CertainTeed and Knauff both offer thermal, acoustical, and mechanical insulation products with EPDs (and some with HPDs) FLOORING Flooring is the mother lode of EPDs and HPDs. Contractors could probably find all twenty products for each credit in this category alone, with products that include carpet, tile, VCT, linoleum, rubber flooring, cove base and all the associated adhesives behind them. Consider yourself in good shape with products from Armstrong, Beaulieu, Bentley Mills, Crossville, American Olean Tile, Daltile, ECORE, Emser, Forbo, Interface, Milliken, Mohawk, Patcraft and Shaw, while Laticrete, WF Taylor and XL Brands provide plenty of options to hold those products in place. ROOFING Contractors have options on top of the building almost no matter what type of roof is specified. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association has industry wide EPDs for asphalt-based roofs, including mod-bit, built-up and shingles, while multiple manufacturers have EPDs for PVC membrane roofs including Carlisle, Duro-Last and GAF. PAINTS Paints have you covered (ha!) as well. Benjamin Moore, PPG, Sherwin Williams and ECOS all have a line (or more) that have EPDs and/or MIR compatibility. Also note, each sheen counts as a distinct product, so you can count a primer, flat, semi-gloss and gloss as 4 individual products for both EPDs and HPDs. METALS Products that are using structural steel or metal studs are in luck. There are industry wide EPDs for structural steel, joists, and deck, and some product specific EPDs for Rebar from Gerdeau, CMC, and Re-Steel and interior metal framing and accessories from Merino+Ware – enough to pick up another 5 products. DOORS/WINDOWS/HARDWARE This category offers an unexpected wealth of options. If your project has commercial entries/windows/storefronts, a number of options exist from YKK, Assa Abloy and Kawneer, and there are a surprising number of door hinges, locks, stoppers, openers and hardware that have EPDs from the likes of Norton, Pemko, Sargent and Schlage. While this of course is not a comprehensive list of all the products and categories that offer EPDs or HPDs, these 8 product categories are found on most commercial construction projects. Contracts can focus their efforts around these categories to not spend hundreds of hours trying to track down information on every nail and screw, and instead focus on getting their projects complete on time and on budget – while still reaching their certification goals. Visit: http://getgreenbadger.com
    May 09, 2018 129

  • Once water begins to come through the roof most sheds, by the very nature of their soft wood structure, quickly rot and if remedial action is not taken then most will soon be looking for a replacement. Replacing a felt roof is not as hard as it looks and only requires basic DIY skills and a little help from a friend or neighbour. Simply follow these easy steps and your shed will be as good as new. You will need at least half a day to complete the project and will require Shed Felt, Roofing Felt Adhesive and Clout Head Nails. Make sure you also have the right tools such as a tape measure, sharp knife gloves, an old cloth, straight edge hammer 2” or 3” and a disposable paint brush. Before you start clean and tidy up the surrounding area, including the floor. To ensure you are properly prepared for later, unpack and roll your shed felt onto a clean and dry surface. This allows it to relax or straighten after being rolled up. Roofing felt is harder to work at low temperature so try to avoid working with it below 10° or in wet or windy conditions. Prepare the surface of the shed roof by removing any old roof felt or nails. Ensure the surface is flat, clean and dry. If the roof is rotten or damaged, you may want to apply a complete new sheet of ply. Measure your shed by running a tape measure along the bottom of the roof (the eaves), and up the diagonal end (the gable). Write down these measurements (it’s easiest to use metric as shed felt normally comes in 8m or 10m rolls). Remember too that you will need the felt to overhang each gable end, and the eave of the shed by at least 50mm (so you need to add this to your measurements). Calculate how many lengths of roof felt are needed: The felt will be applied in strips, with each strip overlapping the previous one by at least 75mm. A final length sheet will be required along the ridge. Calculate how many strips and of what length you will need. Cut your roof felt to length: Using your straight edge and sharp knife, carefully cut your felt to the correct length (don’t forget to include the extra 50mm overhang at each end!) Nail on the first length: Position the first length of roof felt along the lowest part of the shed roof. Ensure that it overhangs the eaves and each gable end of the roof by 50mm. Nail along the top edge of the strip with the galvanised clout nails. Space the nails at 500mm centres. Fold over the gables and eaves: Starting at the centre of the eave, and taking care not to rip or tear the felt, fold the overhanging felt over the edge of the roof. Fix the overhanging felt using galvanised nails at 50mm. Fix the next length of shed felt: Take your second length of felt. Position this strip so that it overhangs the top of the first sheet by 75mm. Nail along the top of this strip at 500mm. Where the sheets overlap, apply roofing sheet adhesive using a disposable brush. Using a downwards brushing motion, firmly press the top layer of roofing felt onto the adhesive, taking care to ensure that the strip of felt does not ripple or crease. Nail in place at 50mm spacing along the bottom of the strip. Use an old cloth or rag to remove any excess felt adhesive. Continue to work up the complete side of the roof in the same method. Felt the second side of your shed: Repeat the same process for the opposite side of the roof. Fix the capping sheet: The roof should be finished with a capping sheet along the ridge. Place along the ridge of the shed so that it equally overhangs each side of the roof. Always ensure that it overlays the top strips of felt by at least 75mm. Apply roofing felt adhesive to the underside of both sides of the ridge and press the capping sheet into place. Nail along the bottom of each side of the capping sheet at 50mm intervals. And that is all there is to it to ensure that your shed continues to provides many more years of useful life. You can source the materials you need from most local builders merchants or go on line. You can click the link below to Amazon to a supplier that has a five star rating if you prefer to have materials delivered. Click Link for Amazon
    Apr 25, 2018 98
  • Roofs, conservatories, balconies, terraces and walls are extremely prone to water penetration and left alone will ultimately result in major refurbishment. Until fairly recently construction professionals would use a variety of different sealants to tackle an equally wide variety of leak situations, but thankfully science has come to the rescue. There are several companies that have developed advanced ranges of waterproofing solutions that can be simply brushed or rolled onto surfaces, seeping into cracks and other vulnerable areas to produce a barrier, once fully cured, against even the worst weather. Many of these solutions are transparent and virtually invisible once applied which makes them ideal for all types of glass such as conservatory roofs and roof lights. They can also be used on terraces and exposed brickwork helping to enhance the colour of the stone while adding total protection. The good thing is that such solutions can be applied by without any special skills saving householders massive labour costs, but as in all cases, particularly when a leak is at roof level, it is usually best to call in the professionals. If you are planning to do it yourself then make sure that you have enough material; to complete the job. A 20Kg tin will cover around 25 sq metres of surface area depending on the thickness of the coating. Ensure that everything is cleaned up before any solution is laid to ensure maximum performance and ideally three layers should be used on the surface area. Coverage is based on application by roller onto a smooth surface in optimum conditions. Factors like surface porosity, temperature and application method can alter consumption. Installed correctly your roof, conservatory, balcony, terrace or wall will continue to giver many more years of service keeping out the worst of the weather.  If you are looking for such a product then why not check out Maritrans, which is available via Amazon.  Click here for Amazon
    Apr 24, 2018 83
  • It is easier than it looks to build a raised timber deck.  Timber decks can be designed to meet most design situations. According to the Timber Decking and Cladding Association Desired service life options of 15, 30 and 60 years are given in European/British standards. It should be noted that 15 years is considered to be the minimum standard.  For new the NHBC insists on a 60 year service life in accordance with TDCA Code of Practice TDA/RD 08/01. Building a simple timber deck is straightforward and is considered less expensive and more environmentally acceptable than bricks or flagstones. The following step-by-step guide covers and is consistent with most of the basic applications to install timber decking and while these instructions are for guidance only please always remember to check with supplier specifications. Step 1: Make sure you plan in advance to ensure that boards will be flush with your frame. Prepare a level area for the framework by cutting the timber to the required length, then join using exterior wood screws. Check the frame is square by measuring from corner to corner and adjust if necessary Step 2: If you need to raise the frame, cut four blocks of timber to the desired height. Screw these to the inside of the frame at each corner, ensuring they're flush with the top. As these legs will be taking all the weight ensure you use at least three screws per block, Step 3: Place blocks or slabs underneath edge leg to spread the load and provide a level, stable base if your deck is sitting on grass or soil. Position and adjust checking the frame is level using a spirit level Step 4: Three joists are sufficient (one in the middle and the others at the centre-point between the edge of the frame and the centre joist) if you are building a small deck. Mark across one side of the frame first, then repeat on the opposite side. On larger decks, set joists at 400mm centres Step 5: Ensure that you measure across the inside of the frame at the joist marks before cutting lengths of the timber to suit. Fix the joists by tapping them with a rubber based mallet until flush with the top, then screw them in place from the outside of the frame Step 6: Support the joists with additional legs, spaced at 1m intervals. Follow the same method as shown in steps 2 and 3 for these legs, ensuring each is supported by a suitable block or slab Step 7: For the facing, measure the length of the outer sides of your frame and cut the decking boards to suit. Mark the cutting lines with a square to ensure a straight edge. Countersink the facing and screw to the frame, ensuring the facing is flush with the top Step 8: Now you are ready to start laying the deck. Measure across the top of the frame and cut a board to length. Place the first board flush with the outside edge of the frame and facing, and perpendicular to the joists. Mark the location of each joist on the board Step 9: Mark and countersink screw holes over the centre of each joist. Be sure to use a sharp countersink that will leave a clean hole. If necessary, drill a pilot hole to prevent splitting. Use at least two screws per joist for each decking board Step 10: Ensure you have a 5mm expansion gap between each board (as timber expands and contracts according to outdoor temperatures). Use a spacer to do this. Step 11: Continue the process until you have completed the job. There are many different sources for Timber Decking but we recomend the following link to AMAZON. Click here for Amazon
    Sep 16, 2017 1137
  • Horrible looking drains, manhole covers and inspection chambers appear in driveways and footpaths everywhere. You can even find them in the middle of your lawn or garden! How do you hide ugly manhole covers and drains?                     There are several ways to pretty up these ugly necessities but, however you choose to do it, remember that water utility companies require access at all times. If they cannot be accessed when required they will be dug up and not only will you receive a bill for doing so, you will also be left with the expense of repairing any damage. A much better idea is to (where possible) replace the existing industrial looking cover with a removable recessed (or inset) tray. Then you have the option to either blend them in with the surface or make a feature out of them. Recessed tray options A quick internet search will show you just how many different types of recessed trays are available – too many to mention here! You choose depending on where they are and what material you are going to fill them with. Basically they fall into two categories: Standard recessed tray Currently the most popular choice, made from polypropylene, aluminium or stainless steel and can be suitable for use by both pedestrians and vehicles. Permeable recessed tray This more recent option from EcoGrid provides a load bearing surface that features membranes and a perforated base which allows water to slowly filter through to the drain underneath. Infill options Another internet search will result in a lot of options for infilling a recessed tray. Your final choice will depend on where the drain, manhole cover or inspection chamber is and what the surface will be used for. Here are a few of the most popular infill options: Block paving or bricks These are common choices and can be cut to either blend in or contrast with the surrounding surface. Resin bound paving This is the most popular choice for the seamless finish - created by infilling the recessed tray with the same colour aggregate. You can also create contrast by using a different colour or produce a logo or design in the recessed tray. Using a permeable recessed tray with resin bound paving creates a fully permeable surface. Loose gravel Probably the quickest and easiest way to infill a recessed tray is with loose gravel, but it will inevitably scatter. The fleeing gravel will need regular sweeping and replacing and your lawn mower won’t like it much either... Grass Whilst sowing grass seeds into a recessed tray blends in with a lawn it can be awkward to mow and unless it’s sown in a permeable recessed tray, it will dry out very quickly. Of course you could opt for artificial grass… Plants and flowers Infilling with flowers and/or plants can help disguise unsightly drains, manhole covers or inspection chambers. You can also create a spectacular feature, but as with grass they will dry out very quickly unless a permeable recessed tray is used. Useful links: How to build a recessed manhole cover : http://www.diy.com/help-ideas/how-to-build-a-manhole-cover/CC_npcart_400198.art An overview http://www.pavingexpert.com/recess01.htm  from the Paving Expert. We strongly recommend clarifying ownership and responsibility before modifying or carrying out maintenance to drains, sewers and manholes. Author: Gail Gilkes, Head of Marketing, SureSet UK Ltd. Visit: www.sureset.co.uk Follow us: https://twitter.com/SureSetUK https://www.youtube.com/user/SureSetUK15 https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1220581/
    Sep 14, 2017 1138