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Talk. Build 's Entries

  • 18 Apr 2018
    Since its founding in 1988, Baumit’s key driver has been the desire to help create beautiful, energy-efficient and healthy homes. Everybody deserves to live in beautiful, affordable and healthy surroundings.Our four walls provide protection for our families, and these are the qualities that enhance people's lives. Homeowners are becoming more and more energy conscious, and being able to cater to consumer needs is a must for success in any industry. A report from Smart Energy GB found that four in five people who had recently had a smart meter installed had taken steps to reduce their energy use, 45% of which were monitoring their consumption more closely than before. More than 75% of the energy consumption of an average household is spent on heating. Efficient thermal insulation is unavoidable if you want to save money, protect the basic structure of your building and reduce your carbon emissions. EWI, correctly installed, will minimise heating costs during cold weather and prevent excess heating during the warm season, saving energy year round. A thermal renovation can save a household more than 50% of its energy costs. A working knowledge of External Wall Insulation products will prove invaluable when communicating the value of your projects. It isn’t enough to simply create the products needed to facilitate these goals, however. Baumit is dedicated to creating change throughout the industry, informing and educating the next generation of installers and applicators. That’s why Baumit has opened a brand new training academy in Aylesford, Kent, to host a series of installer courses catering to all levels of experience. From March 2018, this purpose-built facility will be open to those within the construction industry, providing vital theoretical and practical experience in a range of EWI systems and practices. Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit, said: “Our installer courses provide a perfect opportunity for installers of all ability and members of the construction industry to gain a valuable working knowledge of External Wall Insulation. The experts at our training academy are fully-equipped to offer a wide-range of theoretical and practical advice to ensure clients come away better-informed of the processes and systems involved in all things EWI.” The training facility and courses were designed to cover aspects which are missing from other courses, supporting installers in learning the solutions to real life scenarios that a purely theoretical understanding would not prepare them for. In focusing on the details, rather than just the basics, applicators will receive an in depth understanding of the benefits of a high quality product, properly installed. Spread over 2 days, the Silver and Gold courses offer participants time to reflect on what they have been taught, allowing them adequate time to raise any questions they might have. Baumit is dedicated to building relationships with course participants, and encourages questions and communication both during and after the course is complete, ensuring that they feel comfortable and confident in their abilities and with the product. Baumit is committed to providing exemplary support to its installers, supporting their future work with upskilling, up-to-date information on legislative changes, and phone support, leading to higher quality installs. By supporting the next generation of installers and applicators, Baumit is ensuring that its commitment to beautiful, healthy and energy-efficient homes is continued – helping to deliver a better future for everyone. Visit our website: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Since its founding in 1988, Baumit’s key driver has been the desire to help create beautiful, energy-efficient and healthy homes. Everybody deserves to live in beautiful, affordable and healthy surroundings.Our four walls provide protection for our families, and these are the qualities that enhance people's lives. Homeowners are becoming more and more energy conscious, and being able to cater to consumer needs is a must for success in any industry. A report from Smart Energy GB found that four in five people who had recently had a smart meter installed had taken steps to reduce their energy use, 45% of which were monitoring their consumption more closely than before. More than 75% of the energy consumption of an average household is spent on heating. Efficient thermal insulation is unavoidable if you want to save money, protect the basic structure of your building and reduce your carbon emissions. EWI, correctly installed, will minimise heating costs during cold weather and prevent excess heating during the warm season, saving energy year round. A thermal renovation can save a household more than 50% of its energy costs. A working knowledge of External Wall Insulation products will prove invaluable when communicating the value of your projects. It isn’t enough to simply create the products needed to facilitate these goals, however. Baumit is dedicated to creating change throughout the industry, informing and educating the next generation of installers and applicators. That’s why Baumit has opened a brand new training academy in Aylesford, Kent, to host a series of installer courses catering to all levels of experience. From March 2018, this purpose-built facility will be open to those within the construction industry, providing vital theoretical and practical experience in a range of EWI systems and practices. Chris Kendall, Field Engineer at Baumit, said: “Our installer courses provide a perfect opportunity for installers of all ability and members of the construction industry to gain a valuable working knowledge of External Wall Insulation. The experts at our training academy are fully-equipped to offer a wide-range of theoretical and practical advice to ensure clients come away better-informed of the processes and systems involved in all things EWI.” The training facility and courses were designed to cover aspects which are missing from other courses, supporting installers in learning the solutions to real life scenarios that a purely theoretical understanding would not prepare them for. In focusing on the details, rather than just the basics, applicators will receive an in depth understanding of the benefits of a high quality product, properly installed. Spread over 2 days, the Silver and Gold courses offer participants time to reflect on what they have been taught, allowing them adequate time to raise any questions they might have. Baumit is dedicated to building relationships with course participants, and encourages questions and communication both during and after the course is complete, ensuring that they feel comfortable and confident in their abilities and with the product. Baumit is committed to providing exemplary support to its installers, supporting their future work with upskilling, up-to-date information on legislative changes, and phone support, leading to higher quality installs. By supporting the next generation of installers and applicators, Baumit is ensuring that its commitment to beautiful, healthy and energy-efficient homes is continued – helping to deliver a better future for everyone. Visit our website: http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    Apr 18, 2018 0
  • 12 Apr 2018
    The building boom the government needs to initiate to redress the imbalance between UK housing need and availability should – in theory – create abundant work opportunities for contractors of all construction type. Getting to the front of the queue when the selection process starts for any project, be it site-based or a straightforward job application, requires having more to offer than those bidding for the same position. Staying just one small step ahead of the opposition in terms of professional skills and experience can go a long way to securing that vital contract. Keeping pace Even those with a construction career span as long as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge should refrain from considering themselves beyond learning new tricks of the trade. After all, those who stand still commercially or personally risk being left high and dry by the tides of change. As the 21st century advances, so does the breadth and capability of building products and practices. It’s not a stretch, therefore, to say only those who keep pace with industry trends and standards will remain a competitive force in the marketplace. The UK needs new housing like never before; housing that is sustainable, conforms to unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and is built in the shortest time as possible. Opportunity has never knocked more loudly for those in the construction sector, but only those able to meet the required skill levels shall reap the rewards. Training academies, such as those being set-up by Baumit, will help candidates ‘skill-up’ and meet the construction industry’s current and future demands. At our UK headquarters in Aylesford, Kent Baumit has devised a series of External Wall Insulation courses for installers and applicators. Designed to cater for candidates of all ability, the two-day courses are tailored to suit individual or group needs, offering hands-on, practical learning experience with ‘real-life’ challenges usually encountered in the workplace. We offer three levels of course - bronze, silver and gold – each devised to enhance the professional capabilities of candidates, depending on their current skill level. Those who complete the bronze-to-gold journey will earn an industry qualification in the form of OSCAR Onsite overview and approval, as well as become a Baumit-approved partner and gain access to a host of other benefits. Support As part of our aftercare service, candidates who complete the course will have the ongoing support of Baumit’s technical team. It means whether you’re on-site or in the office, our experts are a reassuring phone call away to offer guidance and advice on all EWI-related matters. Offerings such as this can be the difference between a project being completed on time and to a high standard, or it failing due to issues such as a lack of attention to seemingly minor technical details. With its training academy, Baumit has built a platform for EWI installers to stay ahead of the opposition as the industry gears-up for future challenges and change. Visit:http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The building boom the government needs to initiate to redress the imbalance between UK housing need and availability should – in theory – create abundant work opportunities for contractors of all construction type. Getting to the front of the queue when the selection process starts for any project, be it site-based or a straightforward job application, requires having more to offer than those bidding for the same position. Staying just one small step ahead of the opposition in terms of professional skills and experience can go a long way to securing that vital contract. Keeping pace Even those with a construction career span as long as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge should refrain from considering themselves beyond learning new tricks of the trade. After all, those who stand still commercially or personally risk being left high and dry by the tides of change. As the 21st century advances, so does the breadth and capability of building products and practices. It’s not a stretch, therefore, to say only those who keep pace with industry trends and standards will remain a competitive force in the marketplace. The UK needs new housing like never before; housing that is sustainable, conforms to unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and is built in the shortest time as possible. Opportunity has never knocked more loudly for those in the construction sector, but only those able to meet the required skill levels shall reap the rewards. Training academies, such as those being set-up by Baumit, will help candidates ‘skill-up’ and meet the construction industry’s current and future demands. At our UK headquarters in Aylesford, Kent Baumit has devised a series of External Wall Insulation courses for installers and applicators. Designed to cater for candidates of all ability, the two-day courses are tailored to suit individual or group needs, offering hands-on, practical learning experience with ‘real-life’ challenges usually encountered in the workplace. We offer three levels of course - bronze, silver and gold – each devised to enhance the professional capabilities of candidates, depending on their current skill level. Those who complete the bronze-to-gold journey will earn an industry qualification in the form of OSCAR Onsite overview and approval, as well as become a Baumit-approved partner and gain access to a host of other benefits. Support As part of our aftercare service, candidates who complete the course will have the ongoing support of Baumit’s technical team. It means whether you’re on-site or in the office, our experts are a reassuring phone call away to offer guidance and advice on all EWI-related matters. Offerings such as this can be the difference between a project being completed on time and to a high standard, or it failing due to issues such as a lack of attention to seemingly minor technical details. With its training academy, Baumit has built a platform for EWI installers to stay ahead of the opposition as the industry gears-up for future challenges and change. Visit:http://info.baumit.co.uk/baumit-academy-courses
    Apr 12, 2018 0
  • 06 Apr 2018
    They have been around for more than 140 years and operate on a tried and tested principle - being set off by heat.  Notwithstanding that, sprinklers have been refined and improved over the decades utilising new materials and scientific design to produce droplets that most effectively extinguish the fire. Despite this, there remains a lack of understanding and some surprising misconceptions which tragically prevent them from being installed. The Business Sprinkler Alliance dispels and debunks the myths, and demonstrates why automatic fire sprinklers can stop a fire in its tracks, providing round-the-clock, cost-effective protection for buildings. Myth #1: A fire detection system provides enough protection. Fire detection systems save lives by providing a warning of fire, but can do nothing to control or extinguish a growing fire. Myth #2: Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be more extensive than fire damage. Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be far less severe than the damage caused by water from firefighters’ hoses. Modern sprinklers operate very quickly to release 45 – 200 litres of water per minute, compared to 700 – 4000 litres per minute discharged by fire service hoses and jets. Myth #3: When one sprinkler goes off, won’t they all go off? All sprinklers going off at once might well have been perpetuated by Hollywood for comic and dramatic effect but only the sprinkler heads in the immediate vicinity of a fire will operate because each sprinkler head is individually activated by heat. Research carried out over 20 years shows that 80% of fires are controlled or extinguished by the operation of fewer than six sprinkler heads. Myth #4: Fire sprinklers are expensive to maintain. Sprinkler systems must be inspected, tested, and maintained to ensure a high degree of reliability. However, sprinkler systems only need two maintenance visits a year by a contractor. This costs around £500 a year for larger systems. Small systems require only an annual visit and this will cost between £75 and £100. Any misconception surrounding the costs of sprinkler systems can be dispelled by looking at the true costs of a building over the lifespan of that building. The low whole-life costs of a fire sprinkler system make investment attractive. Fire sprinkler systems will last the lifetime of a building without major replacement or refurbishment. The industry claims a service life of around 40 years, but it is well known that there are many sprinkler systems from the 1930s which are still operational. Automatic fire sprinkler systems are critical to physical resilience and business continuity. When a fire starts in a building fitted with a fully functioning sprinkler system it has a high probability of being contained from the outset, controlling or extinguishing the fire in advance of fire and rescue services’ arrival. In the vast majority of cases the impacted business is fully functioning within hours. They save lives, reduce the threat to firefighters, reduce the burden on the fire service, save businesses, save jobs and protect the environment.  Visit the www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org    
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • They have been around for more than 140 years and operate on a tried and tested principle - being set off by heat.  Notwithstanding that, sprinklers have been refined and improved over the decades utilising new materials and scientific design to produce droplets that most effectively extinguish the fire. Despite this, there remains a lack of understanding and some surprising misconceptions which tragically prevent them from being installed. The Business Sprinkler Alliance dispels and debunks the myths, and demonstrates why automatic fire sprinklers can stop a fire in its tracks, providing round-the-clock, cost-effective protection for buildings. Myth #1: A fire detection system provides enough protection. Fire detection systems save lives by providing a warning of fire, but can do nothing to control or extinguish a growing fire. Myth #2: Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be more extensive than fire damage. Water damage from a fire sprinkler system will be far less severe than the damage caused by water from firefighters’ hoses. Modern sprinklers operate very quickly to release 45 – 200 litres of water per minute, compared to 700 – 4000 litres per minute discharged by fire service hoses and jets. Myth #3: When one sprinkler goes off, won’t they all go off? All sprinklers going off at once might well have been perpetuated by Hollywood for comic and dramatic effect but only the sprinkler heads in the immediate vicinity of a fire will operate because each sprinkler head is individually activated by heat. Research carried out over 20 years shows that 80% of fires are controlled or extinguished by the operation of fewer than six sprinkler heads. Myth #4: Fire sprinklers are expensive to maintain. Sprinkler systems must be inspected, tested, and maintained to ensure a high degree of reliability. However, sprinkler systems only need two maintenance visits a year by a contractor. This costs around £500 a year for larger systems. Small systems require only an annual visit and this will cost between £75 and £100. Any misconception surrounding the costs of sprinkler systems can be dispelled by looking at the true costs of a building over the lifespan of that building. The low whole-life costs of a fire sprinkler system make investment attractive. Fire sprinkler systems will last the lifetime of a building without major replacement or refurbishment. The industry claims a service life of around 40 years, but it is well known that there are many sprinkler systems from the 1930s which are still operational. Automatic fire sprinkler systems are critical to physical resilience and business continuity. When a fire starts in a building fitted with a fully functioning sprinkler system it has a high probability of being contained from the outset, controlling or extinguishing the fire in advance of fire and rescue services’ arrival. In the vast majority of cases the impacted business is fully functioning within hours. They save lives, reduce the threat to firefighters, reduce the burden on the fire service, save businesses, save jobs and protect the environment.  Visit the www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org    
    Apr 06, 2018 0
  • 05 Apr 2018
    The areas in which self-compacting concrete is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. Self-compacting concrete was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully-compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. Since 2000, Sika has been among companies leading the development of self-compacting concrete in the UK. Its growth in this country is predominately due to its use in ground floor housing slabs. Before its introduction, conventional concrete made this type of application machine and labour intensive. For instance, concrete poured in the traditional way and is tacky and stiff in consistency, would normally require up to six installers to screed an area. This method also requires the use of mechanical vibration to rid the freshly-poured concrete of entrapped air to ensure its suitability and long-term performance. And that’s not all. Upon installation, concrete applied the ‘old-fashioned way’ needs to be power-floated to give the slab a smooth, polished finish. Concreting an area the same size using self-compacting material requires at least half the manpower to complete in half the time, with its speed and ease of placement being key to its improved management and distribution. Easy placement Laying self-compacting concrete is like laying liquid as opposed to treacle - it’s that easy. It also eliminates the need for power-floating as it naturally provides a polished, high-quality finish. The secret of this substance’s success can be found in admixtures such as Sika ViscoFlow®, which brings much-needed flexibility to the most challenging concreting application. Infused with graded aggregate, the high-performance admixture extends the concrete’s plasticity, with its two-hour retention property allowing time for site transportation and placement. Sika ViscoFlow® technology also ensures target consistency in a concrete mix in high or low temperature climates in new-build and refurbishment projects. Preparation is vital to successful self-compacting concrete placement. Admixture/aggregate ratios should be tailored to the precise needs of the project’s size and scope. A slip membrane should also be used in conjunction with all self-compacting applications. Again, this method negates the need for mechanical vibration processes, therefore increasing on-site health and safety and resulting in a time and cost-effective installation with a material that is stronger and more durable than traditional placement techniques. Fibres Another important development in self-compacting concrete is the availability of fibres which new NHBC regulations state should be incorporated within certain applications. From January 2018, the authority decreed steel, micro or macro fibres or steel mesh should be used - where appropriate - as reinforcement to concrete toppings above suspended beam and block floors. Sika is already ahead of the curve on that score by providing a range of fibres which allow concrete mix designs to meet NHBC specifications. In terms of the future, it’s my wish to see self-compacting concrete be used more architecturally in building columns and facias. Its flexibility certainly allows for a more design-led approach to its application, which could be enhanced by the availability of pigmented self-compacting solutions. Compatibility with watertight admixtures would also advance self-compacting concrete’s use whilst eliminating the risk of lack of compaction – one of the biggest threats to its long-term performance. Whatever tomorrow holds, the one thing we can be sure of today is self-compacting concrete’s status as an easy-to-apply, durable alternative to conventional concrete, with its superb flexibility being without detriment to its proven, long-term strength. By Peter Cowan, Regional Sales Manager at Sika Concrete & Waterproofing Visit: www.sika.co.uk  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The areas in which self-compacting concrete is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. Self-compacting concrete was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully-compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. Since 2000, Sika has been among companies leading the development of self-compacting concrete in the UK. Its growth in this country is predominately due to its use in ground floor housing slabs. Before its introduction, conventional concrete made this type of application machine and labour intensive. For instance, concrete poured in the traditional way and is tacky and stiff in consistency, would normally require up to six installers to screed an area. This method also requires the use of mechanical vibration to rid the freshly-poured concrete of entrapped air to ensure its suitability and long-term performance. And that’s not all. Upon installation, concrete applied the ‘old-fashioned way’ needs to be power-floated to give the slab a smooth, polished finish. Concreting an area the same size using self-compacting material requires at least half the manpower to complete in half the time, with its speed and ease of placement being key to its improved management and distribution. Easy placement Laying self-compacting concrete is like laying liquid as opposed to treacle - it’s that easy. It also eliminates the need for power-floating as it naturally provides a polished, high-quality finish. The secret of this substance’s success can be found in admixtures such as Sika ViscoFlow®, which brings much-needed flexibility to the most challenging concreting application. Infused with graded aggregate, the high-performance admixture extends the concrete’s plasticity, with its two-hour retention property allowing time for site transportation and placement. Sika ViscoFlow® technology also ensures target consistency in a concrete mix in high or low temperature climates in new-build and refurbishment projects. Preparation is vital to successful self-compacting concrete placement. Admixture/aggregate ratios should be tailored to the precise needs of the project’s size and scope. A slip membrane should also be used in conjunction with all self-compacting applications. Again, this method negates the need for mechanical vibration processes, therefore increasing on-site health and safety and resulting in a time and cost-effective installation with a material that is stronger and more durable than traditional placement techniques. Fibres Another important development in self-compacting concrete is the availability of fibres which new NHBC regulations state should be incorporated within certain applications. From January 2018, the authority decreed steel, micro or macro fibres or steel mesh should be used - where appropriate - as reinforcement to concrete toppings above suspended beam and block floors. Sika is already ahead of the curve on that score by providing a range of fibres which allow concrete mix designs to meet NHBC specifications. In terms of the future, it’s my wish to see self-compacting concrete be used more architecturally in building columns and facias. Its flexibility certainly allows for a more design-led approach to its application, which could be enhanced by the availability of pigmented self-compacting solutions. Compatibility with watertight admixtures would also advance self-compacting concrete’s use whilst eliminating the risk of lack of compaction – one of the biggest threats to its long-term performance. Whatever tomorrow holds, the one thing we can be sure of today is self-compacting concrete’s status as an easy-to-apply, durable alternative to conventional concrete, with its superb flexibility being without detriment to its proven, long-term strength. By Peter Cowan, Regional Sales Manager at Sika Concrete & Waterproofing Visit: www.sika.co.uk  
    Apr 05, 2018 0
  • 27 Mar 2018
    The involvement of a large number of professionals makes it really difficult to manage construction projects.  The involvement of several teams such as surveyors, architects and engineers, drafters and 3D modellers, fabricators and labourers etc., makes it really hard for construction managers (general contractors) to monitor and manage onsite activities. The only way to streamline onsite activities is to maintain swift communication between all the construction professionals. General contractors have to be accountable for managing everything from the beginning of the project until a completed building or structure is handed over to the owners. They have to be accountable for arranging raw materials, its swift delivery, and for keeping all the parties informed about the day to day developments. So, if you are a general contractor, here’s how you should manage a project and enhance the productivity of all building professionals. Planning It’s the responsibility of general contractors to plan the project in advance. So, you have to document all the jobs and allot deadlines for them to be completed. It helps in setting the stage for carrying out onsite construction activities swiftly. The accomplishment of construction projects in the right remain the result of detailed planning and sticking to it throughout the project life cycle. Ordering Quality Materials  General contractors also have to arrange the materials for construction. They have to place orders at the right time and ensure that materials are delivered as per their requirements. Using quality Ready Mix Concrete or RMC is the key to constructing durable buildings and structures. Several materials are used for executing residential, commercial and industrial projects, but ready-mix concrete is one of the most important among them and hence, as a general contractor, who is looking after the project, you have to order it from a renowned concrete supplier. Make sure that the concrete supplier is located close to your job site. Since RMC helps in speeding up construction, you should stick to it, rather than thinking about other options. Apart from ordering RMC, you also have to order materials like bricks, binding wires, and steel bars etc., and ensure that they are delivered at the right time. Hiring Skilled Labour Having skilled labour is crucial for speeding up construction. Without skilled workers, you can't construct a building or structure effectively. If in case, you hire unskilled workers they will take double time to accomplish any task when compared to skilled workers. So, you have to stay in touch with relevant industry professionals who can help you in hiring experienced construction workers. Maintaining Safety Ensuring that high safety is maintained in the job sites, is one of the biggest responsibility of general contractors. So, you have to be accountable for providing right training to construction workers and offering quality safety gears to them to eliminate the risk of injuries and accidents. All the workers must be provided with protective gloves, right shoes, safety glasses, hearing protection, and fall protection equipment.  Cost & Time Management General contractors have to keep the track of the expenses involved in construction from time to time, to ensure that the project is not exceeding the budget. Managing the cost is one of the most important responsibilities of general contractors. Therefore, you have to consider all sorts of expenses such as pre-construction expenses (which include the money involved in design development) labour cost, and cost of the materials. In addition to that, the cost involved in rework should also be taken into account. Similarly, they also have to monitor the time involved in carrying out each activity, to ensure that the project is progressing as per the plan. And if in case, you are behind the schedule, then you have to speed up onsite construction activities to finish the project within the deadlines. Visit: http://rmsconcrete.co.uk/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The involvement of a large number of professionals makes it really difficult to manage construction projects.  The involvement of several teams such as surveyors, architects and engineers, drafters and 3D modellers, fabricators and labourers etc., makes it really hard for construction managers (general contractors) to monitor and manage onsite activities. The only way to streamline onsite activities is to maintain swift communication between all the construction professionals. General contractors have to be accountable for managing everything from the beginning of the project until a completed building or structure is handed over to the owners. They have to be accountable for arranging raw materials, its swift delivery, and for keeping all the parties informed about the day to day developments. So, if you are a general contractor, here’s how you should manage a project and enhance the productivity of all building professionals. Planning It’s the responsibility of general contractors to plan the project in advance. So, you have to document all the jobs and allot deadlines for them to be completed. It helps in setting the stage for carrying out onsite construction activities swiftly. The accomplishment of construction projects in the right remain the result of detailed planning and sticking to it throughout the project life cycle. Ordering Quality Materials  General contractors also have to arrange the materials for construction. They have to place orders at the right time and ensure that materials are delivered as per their requirements. Using quality Ready Mix Concrete or RMC is the key to constructing durable buildings and structures. Several materials are used for executing residential, commercial and industrial projects, but ready-mix concrete is one of the most important among them and hence, as a general contractor, who is looking after the project, you have to order it from a renowned concrete supplier. Make sure that the concrete supplier is located close to your job site. Since RMC helps in speeding up construction, you should stick to it, rather than thinking about other options. Apart from ordering RMC, you also have to order materials like bricks, binding wires, and steel bars etc., and ensure that they are delivered at the right time. Hiring Skilled Labour Having skilled labour is crucial for speeding up construction. Without skilled workers, you can't construct a building or structure effectively. If in case, you hire unskilled workers they will take double time to accomplish any task when compared to skilled workers. So, you have to stay in touch with relevant industry professionals who can help you in hiring experienced construction workers. Maintaining Safety Ensuring that high safety is maintained in the job sites, is one of the biggest responsibility of general contractors. So, you have to be accountable for providing right training to construction workers and offering quality safety gears to them to eliminate the risk of injuries and accidents. All the workers must be provided with protective gloves, right shoes, safety glasses, hearing protection, and fall protection equipment.  Cost & Time Management General contractors have to keep the track of the expenses involved in construction from time to time, to ensure that the project is not exceeding the budget. Managing the cost is one of the most important responsibilities of general contractors. Therefore, you have to consider all sorts of expenses such as pre-construction expenses (which include the money involved in design development) labour cost, and cost of the materials. In addition to that, the cost involved in rework should also be taken into account. Similarly, they also have to monitor the time involved in carrying out each activity, to ensure that the project is progressing as per the plan. And if in case, you are behind the schedule, then you have to speed up onsite construction activities to finish the project within the deadlines. Visit: http://rmsconcrete.co.uk/
    Mar 27, 2018 0
  • 22 Feb 2018
    January saw the lowest temperatures in the UK since February 2016, and with the potential for more cold snaps on the way, it’s a good time to review the procedures for placing concrete in cold weather. If young concrete is allowed to cool to below freezing temperature, it is very likely that it will be damaged to the point of being entirely unfit for use. Should freshly-placed concrete be allowed to reach temperatures lower than 0°C, the water in the mix will freeze and expand; maintaining a temperature above zero degrees will help to ensure the intended strength of your concrete is reached- even if it is at a slower rate than was anticipated. However, if the concrete is able to reach a strength of approximately 2N/mm2 it is likely to be able to resist the expansion and damage It is important to note that even if temperatures don’t reach freezing point, low temperatures will cause the concrete’s strength to develop significantly slower than in warmer ambient temperatures. This strength is typically reached within 48 hours for most mixes, should the concrete be kept above 5°C. So how, during cold weather, should you keep concrete sufficiently warm for the first 48 hours to ensure that this strength is able to develop? Concrete should never be poured onto frozen ground, snow or ice. You can use heaters to thaw the ground prior to pouring concrete. If you plan to use heated enclosures, make certain they are both windproof and weatherproof. Your concrete should include a maximum water to cement ratio, to limit bleeding. Additionally, you should not begin your final finishing operations whenever bleed water is still present. It is important that formwork is not removed early, or else there is a risk that concrete in suspended slabs or beams could be too weak to carry its own weight due to the slower rate of strengthening the slow rate of strength development needs to be taken into account when calculating times for formwork removal. Strength gain can be increased by minimising the amount of cement replacements or using admixtures- always seek the advice of your suppliers If temperatures are low enough that frost is expected, useful protection measures include insulated or heated frost blankets and insulated formwork. Timber formwork often offers sufficient insulation by itself. Steel formwork is a poor insulator, and exposed surfaces should be covered with insulating material or temporary covers heated with space heaters. For severe frost, it is best to heat the concrete (10°C) for delivery. If heated concrete is not available, it is better to delay your concreting until the ambient temperature rises to above 2°C. When planning your concreting, you can obtain information on the likely temperatures from the Met Office, and should use this to plan your approach so you are never caught short or forced to delay your work. Armed with this information, you will be able to place your concrete perfectly, first time, whatever the weather. By Andrew Bourne, Senior Area Sales Manager - Concrete at Sika Visit: visit www.sika.co.uk
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • January saw the lowest temperatures in the UK since February 2016, and with the potential for more cold snaps on the way, it’s a good time to review the procedures for placing concrete in cold weather. If young concrete is allowed to cool to below freezing temperature, it is very likely that it will be damaged to the point of being entirely unfit for use. Should freshly-placed concrete be allowed to reach temperatures lower than 0°C, the water in the mix will freeze and expand; maintaining a temperature above zero degrees will help to ensure the intended strength of your concrete is reached- even if it is at a slower rate than was anticipated. However, if the concrete is able to reach a strength of approximately 2N/mm2 it is likely to be able to resist the expansion and damage It is important to note that even if temperatures don’t reach freezing point, low temperatures will cause the concrete’s strength to develop significantly slower than in warmer ambient temperatures. This strength is typically reached within 48 hours for most mixes, should the concrete be kept above 5°C. So how, during cold weather, should you keep concrete sufficiently warm for the first 48 hours to ensure that this strength is able to develop? Concrete should never be poured onto frozen ground, snow or ice. You can use heaters to thaw the ground prior to pouring concrete. If you plan to use heated enclosures, make certain they are both windproof and weatherproof. Your concrete should include a maximum water to cement ratio, to limit bleeding. Additionally, you should not begin your final finishing operations whenever bleed water is still present. It is important that formwork is not removed early, or else there is a risk that concrete in suspended slabs or beams could be too weak to carry its own weight due to the slower rate of strengthening the slow rate of strength development needs to be taken into account when calculating times for formwork removal. Strength gain can be increased by minimising the amount of cement replacements or using admixtures- always seek the advice of your suppliers If temperatures are low enough that frost is expected, useful protection measures include insulated or heated frost blankets and insulated formwork. Timber formwork often offers sufficient insulation by itself. Steel formwork is a poor insulator, and exposed surfaces should be covered with insulating material or temporary covers heated with space heaters. For severe frost, it is best to heat the concrete (10°C) for delivery. If heated concrete is not available, it is better to delay your concreting until the ambient temperature rises to above 2°C. When planning your concreting, you can obtain information on the likely temperatures from the Met Office, and should use this to plan your approach so you are never caught short or forced to delay your work. Armed with this information, you will be able to place your concrete perfectly, first time, whatever the weather. By Andrew Bourne, Senior Area Sales Manager - Concrete at Sika Visit: visit www.sika.co.uk
    Feb 22, 2018 0
  • 09 Feb 2018
    London Zoo. A furniture storage unit on Cranford Street, Smethwick. A block of flats on Joiner Street, Manchester. A multi-storey car park in Liverpool. Woburn Safari Park. Listers Land Rover, Solihull. What do these six seemingly disparate locations have in common? Each has been the victim of fire within recent weeks. Fire does not discriminate and can affect any kind of building or business. There is a tendency to only concern ourselves with the most serious outcome of a fire – loss of life – though any building at risk of fire has the potential to alter lives permanently. Thankfully no human lives were lost in the aforementioned fires, though this is not to say that no lives were affected. Seventy firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze at London Zoo alone, and many more risked their lives at the scenes of the other fires. Woburn Safari Park lost thirteen patas monkeys, a devastating loss for its drive-through enclosure, and the emotional strain on the staff cannot be understated. Drew Mullin, Woburn's managing director, said some keepers were in tears as they tried to deal with the loss. More than 1,600 vehicles and their contents were destroyed in the inferno which tore through the King’s Dock multi-storey in Liverpool. Remarkably no serious injuries were sustained, but it isn’t hard to see how thousands of lives will be impacted, particularly at a time of year when family funds are often tight and the financial loss to the vehicle owners will sting all the more. The fire in a block of apartments on Manchester’s Joiner Street will have rendered a number of residents in need of temporary shelter. A fire such as this in a residential building can quickly become far more serious, and many families will have lost their belongings and sense of security along with their homes. West Midlands Fire Service confirmed that the whole of the furniture unit in Smethwick was alight. With approximately 3,000m2 of floor space, it is hard to imagine how much stock was lost or damaged. The human cost can be measured in loss of potential earnings and jobs, not only in the furniture unit itself but also in local businesses supported by those who work there. Three cars were destroyed and a further five were damaged in a suspected arson attack at Listers Land Rover, a dealership in Solihull. No one was injured, but three emergency vehicles were sent to deal with the fire - including an ambulance, stretching burdened medical services thinner. The causes of each of these fires will be subject to in-depth investigations, and already they serve to reinforce the findings of Dame Judith Hackitt’s recent interim report on Building Regulations and Fire Safety, which has identified that regulations are in urgent need of change. We must always be thankful when a fire is contained and extinguished with no loss of life, but it is not enough. Lives are still affected regardless, and we must strive to minimise the effect that fire has in all circumstances. When we protect property and halt the spread of fire, we also protect lives. A properly controlled fire can be the difference between a building requiring renovation or demolition. Halting the spread of fire when it is first detected is the best way to limit damage and so also minimise costs and impacts, and sprinklers have been shown to contain, control or extinguish fires in 99% of cases1. The tragedy at Grenfell last year offered us a sharp reminder of the devastating effect that fire can have. These recent fires – while thankfully not on the scale of the Grenfell disaster – serve to demonstrate that fire does not discriminate; whether it is a warehouse, a school, a hospital, a car park, a hotel or a shop, fires happen on a regular basis. However, they can be contained and extinguished by systems such as sprinklers to ensure that life is not put at risk and businesses, jobs and the economy are protected. Efficiency and Effectiveness of Sprinkler Systems in the United Kingdom: An Analysis from Fire Service Data, May 2017, Optimal Economics. Visit the  www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • London Zoo. A furniture storage unit on Cranford Street, Smethwick. A block of flats on Joiner Street, Manchester. A multi-storey car park in Liverpool. Woburn Safari Park. Listers Land Rover, Solihull. What do these six seemingly disparate locations have in common? Each has been the victim of fire within recent weeks. Fire does not discriminate and can affect any kind of building or business. There is a tendency to only concern ourselves with the most serious outcome of a fire – loss of life – though any building at risk of fire has the potential to alter lives permanently. Thankfully no human lives were lost in the aforementioned fires, though this is not to say that no lives were affected. Seventy firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze at London Zoo alone, and many more risked their lives at the scenes of the other fires. Woburn Safari Park lost thirteen patas monkeys, a devastating loss for its drive-through enclosure, and the emotional strain on the staff cannot be understated. Drew Mullin, Woburn's managing director, said some keepers were in tears as they tried to deal with the loss. More than 1,600 vehicles and their contents were destroyed in the inferno which tore through the King’s Dock multi-storey in Liverpool. Remarkably no serious injuries were sustained, but it isn’t hard to see how thousands of lives will be impacted, particularly at a time of year when family funds are often tight and the financial loss to the vehicle owners will sting all the more. The fire in a block of apartments on Manchester’s Joiner Street will have rendered a number of residents in need of temporary shelter. A fire such as this in a residential building can quickly become far more serious, and many families will have lost their belongings and sense of security along with their homes. West Midlands Fire Service confirmed that the whole of the furniture unit in Smethwick was alight. With approximately 3,000m2 of floor space, it is hard to imagine how much stock was lost or damaged. The human cost can be measured in loss of potential earnings and jobs, not only in the furniture unit itself but also in local businesses supported by those who work there. Three cars were destroyed and a further five were damaged in a suspected arson attack at Listers Land Rover, a dealership in Solihull. No one was injured, but three emergency vehicles were sent to deal with the fire - including an ambulance, stretching burdened medical services thinner. The causes of each of these fires will be subject to in-depth investigations, and already they serve to reinforce the findings of Dame Judith Hackitt’s recent interim report on Building Regulations and Fire Safety, which has identified that regulations are in urgent need of change. We must always be thankful when a fire is contained and extinguished with no loss of life, but it is not enough. Lives are still affected regardless, and we must strive to minimise the effect that fire has in all circumstances. When we protect property and halt the spread of fire, we also protect lives. A properly controlled fire can be the difference between a building requiring renovation or demolition. Halting the spread of fire when it is first detected is the best way to limit damage and so also minimise costs and impacts, and sprinklers have been shown to contain, control or extinguish fires in 99% of cases1. The tragedy at Grenfell last year offered us a sharp reminder of the devastating effect that fire can have. These recent fires – while thankfully not on the scale of the Grenfell disaster – serve to demonstrate that fire does not discriminate; whether it is a warehouse, a school, a hospital, a car park, a hotel or a shop, fires happen on a regular basis. However, they can be contained and extinguished by systems such as sprinklers to ensure that life is not put at risk and businesses, jobs and the economy are protected. Efficiency and Effectiveness of Sprinkler Systems in the United Kingdom: An Analysis from Fire Service Data, May 2017, Optimal Economics. Visit the  www.business-sprinkler-alliance.org  
    Feb 09, 2018 0
  • 02 Feb 2018
    Every building is made up of hundreds if not thousands of different building products and materials. Each product has been tested in a laboratory and certified to confirm it will do its job. However, once on-site, materials will act differently. They come into contact with different atmospheric conditions and are reliant on the installation by a contractor. This is where on-site technical support proves its worth. On-site technical support is often under-valued, but as a business, Sika places huge emphasis on it. It’s a core part of our product offering and a fundamental part of our everyday business. As a global leader, producing products for a variety of market sectors from construction to automotive (see http://bit.ly/2o8Ca6Z) supporting our customers is something we do - everyday. For Sika, on-site support starts at the research and development stage. We don’t just test new products in a laboratory and then package and sell them. We take them to market and test them in the real world. A laboratory is a controlled environment and our products are not installed in controlled environments – they are installed in some of the most challenging and harsh conditions you can imagine. Every site is different and contractors work in very different ways. As such, it is important to put our products into practice to see how they react. This could be from how they are handled on site; what effect the weather has on them and how they react to other materials. It is also important to get feedback from contractors as they are at the sharp end installing them every day – their feedback on how the product feels, how easy it is to work with is invaluable. We also believe that we have a responsibility to ensure that once our products have been specified, they are installed correctly and the end results meet the client’s expectations. Changing specifications happens all too frequently, often as a way of reducing costs. However, sometimes a change in specification has a knock-on effect and the end result is that it isn’t fit for purpose and ends-up costing the client more money. There is also the issue of interpretation. Many commercial and industrial projects we visit are made up of different areas, from manufacture to storage. The floors in these different parts of the building need to be treated differently as their usage can differ greatly. Therefore, different grades of flooring should be specified depending on their intended use. This is easy to overlook when looking at project drawings, but with on-site support the use of the building can quickly be ascertained and a suitable specification created. On-site technical support shouldn’t stop there. We work closely with our contractor network to assist them on a job-by-job basis. This starts with training for a site operative at our Preston or Welwyn Garden City facilities and runs right through to assessing on site performance on a job. This is essential for projects where Sika is providing a guarantee. Technical support adds value at every stage – from helping develop new product to creating appropriate specifications, assisting with workmanship to ensuring a specification is maintained and the results exceed expectation. The only way to do this is by witnessing products in-use and seeing projects being delivered. There is no substitute to real life. On-site support may be a traditional value, but it’s a value that Sika believes strongly in, and it’s something that I believe makes us that little bit different. By Mark Prizeman, Sika Technical Services Manager, Flooring and Refurbishment Visit: http://gbr.sika.com/en/group/about-us/sika-everyday.html
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Every building is made up of hundreds if not thousands of different building products and materials. Each product has been tested in a laboratory and certified to confirm it will do its job. However, once on-site, materials will act differently. They come into contact with different atmospheric conditions and are reliant on the installation by a contractor. This is where on-site technical support proves its worth. On-site technical support is often under-valued, but as a business, Sika places huge emphasis on it. It’s a core part of our product offering and a fundamental part of our everyday business. As a global leader, producing products for a variety of market sectors from construction to automotive (see http://bit.ly/2o8Ca6Z) supporting our customers is something we do - everyday. For Sika, on-site support starts at the research and development stage. We don’t just test new products in a laboratory and then package and sell them. We take them to market and test them in the real world. A laboratory is a controlled environment and our products are not installed in controlled environments – they are installed in some of the most challenging and harsh conditions you can imagine. Every site is different and contractors work in very different ways. As such, it is important to put our products into practice to see how they react. This could be from how they are handled on site; what effect the weather has on them and how they react to other materials. It is also important to get feedback from contractors as they are at the sharp end installing them every day – their feedback on how the product feels, how easy it is to work with is invaluable. We also believe that we have a responsibility to ensure that once our products have been specified, they are installed correctly and the end results meet the client’s expectations. Changing specifications happens all too frequently, often as a way of reducing costs. However, sometimes a change in specification has a knock-on effect and the end result is that it isn’t fit for purpose and ends-up costing the client more money. There is also the issue of interpretation. Many commercial and industrial projects we visit are made up of different areas, from manufacture to storage. The floors in these different parts of the building need to be treated differently as their usage can differ greatly. Therefore, different grades of flooring should be specified depending on their intended use. This is easy to overlook when looking at project drawings, but with on-site support the use of the building can quickly be ascertained and a suitable specification created. On-site technical support shouldn’t stop there. We work closely with our contractor network to assist them on a job-by-job basis. This starts with training for a site operative at our Preston or Welwyn Garden City facilities and runs right through to assessing on site performance on a job. This is essential for projects where Sika is providing a guarantee. Technical support adds value at every stage – from helping develop new product to creating appropriate specifications, assisting with workmanship to ensuring a specification is maintained and the results exceed expectation. The only way to do this is by witnessing products in-use and seeing projects being delivered. There is no substitute to real life. On-site support may be a traditional value, but it’s a value that Sika believes strongly in, and it’s something that I believe makes us that little bit different. By Mark Prizeman, Sika Technical Services Manager, Flooring and Refurbishment Visit: http://gbr.sika.com/en/group/about-us/sika-everyday.html
    Feb 02, 2018 0
  • 29 Jan 2018
    Construction giant Carillion’s plunge into liquidation has had an immediate impact, with the firm owing up to 30,000 businesses around £1bn in unpaid costs, as well as putting thousands of jobs at risk. What is clear from the collapse of such a seemingly untouchable giant such as Carillion is that there is a wider review needed for the way the industry is operating under its current business model. As part of that, the traditionally long and uncertain payment terms facing many construction subcontractors needs to be reviewed. The payment processes in place across many businesses within the industry are still manual and complex. Changes are needed to modernise and protect the sector against the impact of cases such as the Carillion collapse. Current reports state that Carillion owed money to between 25,000 and 30,000 businesses, some of which had bills which were equivalent to 10% of their turnover. The knock-on effect for subcontractors and the industry as a whole could be catastrophic. “Looking at previous cases where large contractors have collapsed, you typically see that around 17% or 18% of businesses who are creditors to the company don’t make it through the next five years”, states Suzannah Nichol, chief executive of trade body Build UK. It’s clear that steps are needed to improve cash flow between contractors and subcontractors – for the benefit of all. Automated payment processing systems are shifting from “nice to have” to an essential item for businesses to remain viable. For contractors, they benefit from increased efficiencies and a much more accurate understanding of their liabilities at any given time. For subcontractors, they gain visibility of the progress of their various applications for payment – something that will help them with their business planning. With the right technology, payment processes can become efficient, standardised, transparent and quick. Most importantly, the automation of these processes can allow for tracking and management across the whole supply chain which reduces risk and helps to build a clear and transparent picture of the finances affecting the business. Such disruptive technologies means the industry is facing a future of dramatic change. Visit www.openecx.co.uk
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Construction giant Carillion’s plunge into liquidation has had an immediate impact, with the firm owing up to 30,000 businesses around £1bn in unpaid costs, as well as putting thousands of jobs at risk. What is clear from the collapse of such a seemingly untouchable giant such as Carillion is that there is a wider review needed for the way the industry is operating under its current business model. As part of that, the traditionally long and uncertain payment terms facing many construction subcontractors needs to be reviewed. The payment processes in place across many businesses within the industry are still manual and complex. Changes are needed to modernise and protect the sector against the impact of cases such as the Carillion collapse. Current reports state that Carillion owed money to between 25,000 and 30,000 businesses, some of which had bills which were equivalent to 10% of their turnover. The knock-on effect for subcontractors and the industry as a whole could be catastrophic. “Looking at previous cases where large contractors have collapsed, you typically see that around 17% or 18% of businesses who are creditors to the company don’t make it through the next five years”, states Suzannah Nichol, chief executive of trade body Build UK. It’s clear that steps are needed to improve cash flow between contractors and subcontractors – for the benefit of all. Automated payment processing systems are shifting from “nice to have” to an essential item for businesses to remain viable. For contractors, they benefit from increased efficiencies and a much more accurate understanding of their liabilities at any given time. For subcontractors, they gain visibility of the progress of their various applications for payment – something that will help them with their business planning. With the right technology, payment processes can become efficient, standardised, transparent and quick. Most importantly, the automation of these processes can allow for tracking and management across the whole supply chain which reduces risk and helps to build a clear and transparent picture of the finances affecting the business. Such disruptive technologies means the industry is facing a future of dramatic change. Visit www.openecx.co.uk
    Jan 29, 2018 0
  • 17 Jan 2018
    A proven waterproof solution is essential for safeguarding basements, car parks, tunnels and other belowground concrete structures against damp and water ingress. But which system is best suited to your building? A render-based product? A drainage system incorporating a membrane? Sika offers both solutions as part of its proven, wide-ranging concrete and waterproofing range, so let’s examine the benefits of each. Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged waterproofing system comprises watertight renders and screeds produced using the Sika®-1 Waterproofing Liquid and Sika®-1 Pre-Batched Mortars. The mortars consist of a blend of special cement and kiln dried graded aggregates. Packaged in four grades, each is specifically designed for optimum application performance and durability. Key considerations when specifying Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged: Once applied, it requires absolutely no maintenance It is more cost-effective when applied to areas of 300m2 or less The render system takes up minimal space Bonds directly to the substrate – follows the contours of any structure Withstands high water pressure Substrate preparation may be required  In terms of a water management solution, Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System uses a high density polyethylene internal drainage membrane to control water after it has penetrated a structure. The system is installed, loose-laid in flooring applications and attached to the wall with surface plugs in vertical installations. The system directs penetrating water into a drainage system and a collection sump before using a pump to discharge water from the building. A cavity drain provides protection from the ingress of water, vapour and gases. Key considerations when specifying Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System: System requires ongoing maintenance and running costs Requires more space to install Acts as a vapour barrier Limited surface preparation required Can be used where the substrate does not have the strength to resist stresses caused by water pressure Most cost-effective on areas larger than 300m2  Although varying in application and comprising different materials, the systems share common properties. For instance, Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged and Cavity Drain are suitable for new-build and refurbishment projects involving a range of belowground structures. As well as being BBA-approved, both systems carry a Sika guarantee when installed by an approved contractor. Other common properties include the systems’ suitability for use to grades 1-3 according to BS 8102-2009, and high water table according to BS 8102-2009. What then, must we conclude from this comparison? Well, by eliminating the need for ongoing maintenance, the Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged system is a more cost-effective solution over a lifespan of 60 years, particularly for structures 300m2 and below. Not as simple to apply as the pre-bagged system, on account of its additional components, Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System is a more ideal waterproofing solution for areas larger than 300m2. Ongoing running costs are incurred, as the system requires regular maintenance. Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged or Sika® CD-Cavity Drain system…whichever system you choose as your belowground solution, you are guaranteed the same quality: superb, long-term waterproof performance. Sika operates a Registered Contractors scheme, designed to help facilitate the selection of suitable contractors to install Sika waterproofing systems including Sika®-1 and Cavity Drain. Choosing a Sika Registered Contractor provides total quality control – from product to service and installation – giving clients added reassurance that they will receive the highest standards of professionalism at every stage. Visit: https://www.sikawaterproofing.co.uk/products-systems/sika-cd-cavity-drainage-system/  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • A proven waterproof solution is essential for safeguarding basements, car parks, tunnels and other belowground concrete structures against damp and water ingress. But which system is best suited to your building? A render-based product? A drainage system incorporating a membrane? Sika offers both solutions as part of its proven, wide-ranging concrete and waterproofing range, so let’s examine the benefits of each. Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged waterproofing system comprises watertight renders and screeds produced using the Sika®-1 Waterproofing Liquid and Sika®-1 Pre-Batched Mortars. The mortars consist of a blend of special cement and kiln dried graded aggregates. Packaged in four grades, each is specifically designed for optimum application performance and durability. Key considerations when specifying Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged: Once applied, it requires absolutely no maintenance It is more cost-effective when applied to areas of 300m2 or less The render system takes up minimal space Bonds directly to the substrate – follows the contours of any structure Withstands high water pressure Substrate preparation may be required  In terms of a water management solution, Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System uses a high density polyethylene internal drainage membrane to control water after it has penetrated a structure. The system is installed, loose-laid in flooring applications and attached to the wall with surface plugs in vertical installations. The system directs penetrating water into a drainage system and a collection sump before using a pump to discharge water from the building. A cavity drain provides protection from the ingress of water, vapour and gases. Key considerations when specifying Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System: System requires ongoing maintenance and running costs Requires more space to install Acts as a vapour barrier Limited surface preparation required Can be used where the substrate does not have the strength to resist stresses caused by water pressure Most cost-effective on areas larger than 300m2  Although varying in application and comprising different materials, the systems share common properties. For instance, Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged and Cavity Drain are suitable for new-build and refurbishment projects involving a range of belowground structures. As well as being BBA-approved, both systems carry a Sika guarantee when installed by an approved contractor. Other common properties include the systems’ suitability for use to grades 1-3 according to BS 8102-2009, and high water table according to BS 8102-2009. What then, must we conclude from this comparison? Well, by eliminating the need for ongoing maintenance, the Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged system is a more cost-effective solution over a lifespan of 60 years, particularly for structures 300m2 and below. Not as simple to apply as the pre-bagged system, on account of its additional components, Sika® CD-Cavity Drain System is a more ideal waterproofing solution for areas larger than 300m2. Ongoing running costs are incurred, as the system requires regular maintenance. Sika®-1 Pre-Bagged or Sika® CD-Cavity Drain system…whichever system you choose as your belowground solution, you are guaranteed the same quality: superb, long-term waterproof performance. Sika operates a Registered Contractors scheme, designed to help facilitate the selection of suitable contractors to install Sika waterproofing systems including Sika®-1 and Cavity Drain. Choosing a Sika Registered Contractor provides total quality control – from product to service and installation – giving clients added reassurance that they will receive the highest standards of professionalism at every stage. Visit: https://www.sikawaterproofing.co.uk/products-systems/sika-cd-cavity-drainage-system/  
    Jan 17, 2018 0
  • 03 Jan 2018
    As an industry, we could be accused of focusing on the past rather than looking to the future – in fact, this is a condition that the country suffers from as a whole, and one that can stifle progress. Ultimately, positive, forward thinking, and innovation will attract fresh blood to our industry. But we must learn from our experiences and select important lessons for ourselves and the next generation, as my reality was very different. I stumbled into this sector very much by accident, as many do. After leaving school, I found myself a summer job with a housebuilder as a joiner’s labourer. This helped me through my college years, and I then moved into the equipment hire industry, and construction products sales, where I first gained real perspective on how job sites operated – and how specifications had a big influence on the construction of a building. From there, I began an adventure into aluminium systems, fenestration and the building envelope. The journey into roofing had a familiar feel, then managing a commercial specification team was exciting, and a real challenge as I again was able to influence construction in a tangible way. Joining Sika has really provided a wider opportunity, the company enabled me to move from a regional role, to a national role, and I’m now responsible for a business unit of over £60 million, three branded organisations – Sika Sarnafil, Sika Liquid Plastics and Sika-Trocal – and a team of over 70.    Today, the construction landscape looks very different. There’s a greater focus on Health & Safety, more challenging site restrictions, and a real focus on safe working. Specifications are ever more tested, but we continue to learn and improve. Sustainability, product innovation, logistics, and disposal of waste, have all developed massively. We have a lot to celebrate and share. Training has come on leaps and bounds, making a real contribution to strengthening the sector. We are more aware than ever of how we approach construction and what our roles and responsibilities are. Now I realise that project success, business success and the success of the industry as a whole, is dependent on more than the physical bricks and mortar, it is the people that make the difference. Throughout the years I’ve been lucky to work with some great characters, who invested in my career, and me as an individual, provided great coaching and gave me opportunity to grow. It seems natural that we can now do the same for others. A key focus for me is people development. We talk every day about our teams, where they are in their evolution, what projects are their focuses and how we can provide better support for our employees. Recently, we had the opportunity to contribute at a college careers open day, where one of our team who had progressed in the last few years, told his story. This inspired a number of students, all of whom hadn’t necessarily considered the breadth of roles that the construction industry offers. We were overwhelmed at the interest, and quickly made the decision to move forward. On the back of this, and stimulated by the Apprenticeship Levy, I am overjoyed that we will be welcoming two new apprentices to the Sika Roofing family this year. These young people will join in a general business administration role, and work across all areas for the rest of this year. We will see where their strengths take them, with operations, sales and marketing, and technical services, all offering great opportunities for development. Working in construction really does allow you to ‘choose your own adventure’ and work to your skills and potential. There is even the chance of international roles, a very exciting opportunity. Our apprentices will benefit from a sponsor, a coach, and a long term plan to integrate them into our business culture, and see what the industry is about. Sika’s group values provide a real spirit of entrepreneurship, opportunity and progression.   It’s clear that society and technology have changed younger people’s career choices. The perception of the construction industry and the long term opportunities are different than they were – sometimes negative and occasionally, non-existent. As a career choice from a young age, there is less focus on the traditional jobs, and the skills attached, which is one of the contributing factors to our skills shortage. We’re not going to be able to rely on people ‘falling’ into the industry like we used to – the deficit is too large. Our focus must be to bring young people through our business – actively promoting and educating about the opportunities open to them. If I could give our new apprentices one piece of advice, it is to be open. When I started out all those years ago, I wish I’d know how important it is to listen, to invest in yourself, and have a plan. Also, to take opportunity when it’s presented and forge relationships. I look forward to the new energy they will bring to the business, and call for more manufacturers to take action in telling the positive stories from our industry and developing the stars of tomorrow – we have so much to offer young people and they in turn to offer us. By Rod Benson, Business Unit Manager for Sika Roofing
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • As an industry, we could be accused of focusing on the past rather than looking to the future – in fact, this is a condition that the country suffers from as a whole, and one that can stifle progress. Ultimately, positive, forward thinking, and innovation will attract fresh blood to our industry. But we must learn from our experiences and select important lessons for ourselves and the next generation, as my reality was very different. I stumbled into this sector very much by accident, as many do. After leaving school, I found myself a summer job with a housebuilder as a joiner’s labourer. This helped me through my college years, and I then moved into the equipment hire industry, and construction products sales, where I first gained real perspective on how job sites operated – and how specifications had a big influence on the construction of a building. From there, I began an adventure into aluminium systems, fenestration and the building envelope. The journey into roofing had a familiar feel, then managing a commercial specification team was exciting, and a real challenge as I again was able to influence construction in a tangible way. Joining Sika has really provided a wider opportunity, the company enabled me to move from a regional role, to a national role, and I’m now responsible for a business unit of over £60 million, three branded organisations – Sika Sarnafil, Sika Liquid Plastics and Sika-Trocal – and a team of over 70.    Today, the construction landscape looks very different. There’s a greater focus on Health & Safety, more challenging site restrictions, and a real focus on safe working. Specifications are ever more tested, but we continue to learn and improve. Sustainability, product innovation, logistics, and disposal of waste, have all developed massively. We have a lot to celebrate and share. Training has come on leaps and bounds, making a real contribution to strengthening the sector. We are more aware than ever of how we approach construction and what our roles and responsibilities are. Now I realise that project success, business success and the success of the industry as a whole, is dependent on more than the physical bricks and mortar, it is the people that make the difference. Throughout the years I’ve been lucky to work with some great characters, who invested in my career, and me as an individual, provided great coaching and gave me opportunity to grow. It seems natural that we can now do the same for others. A key focus for me is people development. We talk every day about our teams, where they are in their evolution, what projects are their focuses and how we can provide better support for our employees. Recently, we had the opportunity to contribute at a college careers open day, where one of our team who had progressed in the last few years, told his story. This inspired a number of students, all of whom hadn’t necessarily considered the breadth of roles that the construction industry offers. We were overwhelmed at the interest, and quickly made the decision to move forward. On the back of this, and stimulated by the Apprenticeship Levy, I am overjoyed that we will be welcoming two new apprentices to the Sika Roofing family this year. These young people will join in a general business administration role, and work across all areas for the rest of this year. We will see where their strengths take them, with operations, sales and marketing, and technical services, all offering great opportunities for development. Working in construction really does allow you to ‘choose your own adventure’ and work to your skills and potential. There is even the chance of international roles, a very exciting opportunity. Our apprentices will benefit from a sponsor, a coach, and a long term plan to integrate them into our business culture, and see what the industry is about. Sika’s group values provide a real spirit of entrepreneurship, opportunity and progression.   It’s clear that society and technology have changed younger people’s career choices. The perception of the construction industry and the long term opportunities are different than they were – sometimes negative and occasionally, non-existent. As a career choice from a young age, there is less focus on the traditional jobs, and the skills attached, which is one of the contributing factors to our skills shortage. We’re not going to be able to rely on people ‘falling’ into the industry like we used to – the deficit is too large. Our focus must be to bring young people through our business – actively promoting and educating about the opportunities open to them. If I could give our new apprentices one piece of advice, it is to be open. When I started out all those years ago, I wish I’d know how important it is to listen, to invest in yourself, and have a plan. Also, to take opportunity when it’s presented and forge relationships. I look forward to the new energy they will bring to the business, and call for more manufacturers to take action in telling the positive stories from our industry and developing the stars of tomorrow – we have so much to offer young people and they in turn to offer us. By Rod Benson, Business Unit Manager for Sika Roofing
    Jan 03, 2018 0
  • 30 Oct 2017
    Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring compound found in all organic substances but its presence in pressed timber products such as MDF has long been a contentious issue within the industry. With the increased focus on the importance of minimising risks to health in construction, manufacturers should go beyond the call of duty in reducing added formaldehyde in products. The timber panel products industry has made investments to drive change in this area and ensure that there are products available which reduce added formaldehyde in adhesives to zero. Specifiers are now able to make a strong contribution to reducing the associated health issues which formaldehyde can cause. There are rightly growing health concerns around formaldehyde, which is commonly found in the resins used to glue timber panel products together for strength performance. According to the HSE formaldehyde dust released in manufacture has the potential to lead to asthma and other respiratory problems, although there is no formal evidential link has been made between these issues and wood-based panels. High humidity, heat or sawing or grinding can lead to increased levels of formaldehyde vapour and dust in the air breathed in by workers. The release of formaldehyde as vapour, which can cause irritation, is highest in newly manufactured pressed wood products and decreases over time. The EU has taken steps to address the perceived risks by making all panel products conform to its already well established E1 classification on formaldehyde within EN 13986, meaning wood flooring adhesives have to have less than 0.75 ppm (parts per million) of formaldehyde.  The good news is that HSE states that the levels of so-called free formaldehyde in boards made to class E1 are “insignificant”, due to the resin having altered to form longer molecule chains during manufacture.  This means E1 boards have a negligible amount of formaldehyde present which can be breathed in during production, installation or use. So what does this all mean for a manufacturer? With a consistent commitment to research and development as the leader in the MDF market, Medite has long been at the forefront of reducing formaldehyde emission levels of panel products. We chose to go beyond the regulatory requirements to help protect everyone in the supply chain as well as end users. All of our products not only surpass the European E1 classification by some distance, they also meet the world’s most stringent formaldehyde emission control standard for our product category CARB2 (granted by the Californian Air Resource Board). But is there more that we can do? For customers wanting to ensure the absolute avoidance of added formaldehyde for interior applications requiring a zero tolerance approach, we developed Medite Ecologique. This unique FSC-certified product is manufactured using a zero added formaldehyde resin system. While manufacturers are complying with European standards as required to in order to market their products, we have gone to the next level in to actively mitigate the potential problems caused by added formaldehyde across our product ranges. As a responsible manufacturer we have worked hard to ensure that we have reduced added formaldehyde across all of our ranges. However the ultimate goal is to reduce it to zero and with Medite Ecologique we have achieved that, giving specifiers with stringent sustainability and health requirements the ability to choose the most environmentally sensitive option available for their project. Visit: https://mdfosb.com/en/
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring compound found in all organic substances but its presence in pressed timber products such as MDF has long been a contentious issue within the industry. With the increased focus on the importance of minimising risks to health in construction, manufacturers should go beyond the call of duty in reducing added formaldehyde in products. The timber panel products industry has made investments to drive change in this area and ensure that there are products available which reduce added formaldehyde in adhesives to zero. Specifiers are now able to make a strong contribution to reducing the associated health issues which formaldehyde can cause. There are rightly growing health concerns around formaldehyde, which is commonly found in the resins used to glue timber panel products together for strength performance. According to the HSE formaldehyde dust released in manufacture has the potential to lead to asthma and other respiratory problems, although there is no formal evidential link has been made between these issues and wood-based panels. High humidity, heat or sawing or grinding can lead to increased levels of formaldehyde vapour and dust in the air breathed in by workers. The release of formaldehyde as vapour, which can cause irritation, is highest in newly manufactured pressed wood products and decreases over time. The EU has taken steps to address the perceived risks by making all panel products conform to its already well established E1 classification on formaldehyde within EN 13986, meaning wood flooring adhesives have to have less than 0.75 ppm (parts per million) of formaldehyde.  The good news is that HSE states that the levels of so-called free formaldehyde in boards made to class E1 are “insignificant”, due to the resin having altered to form longer molecule chains during manufacture.  This means E1 boards have a negligible amount of formaldehyde present which can be breathed in during production, installation or use. So what does this all mean for a manufacturer? With a consistent commitment to research and development as the leader in the MDF market, Medite has long been at the forefront of reducing formaldehyde emission levels of panel products. We chose to go beyond the regulatory requirements to help protect everyone in the supply chain as well as end users. All of our products not only surpass the European E1 classification by some distance, they also meet the world’s most stringent formaldehyde emission control standard for our product category CARB2 (granted by the Californian Air Resource Board). But is there more that we can do? For customers wanting to ensure the absolute avoidance of added formaldehyde for interior applications requiring a zero tolerance approach, we developed Medite Ecologique. This unique FSC-certified product is manufactured using a zero added formaldehyde resin system. While manufacturers are complying with European standards as required to in order to market their products, we have gone to the next level in to actively mitigate the potential problems caused by added formaldehyde across our product ranges. As a responsible manufacturer we have worked hard to ensure that we have reduced added formaldehyde across all of our ranges. However the ultimate goal is to reduce it to zero and with Medite Ecologique we have achieved that, giving specifiers with stringent sustainability and health requirements the ability to choose the most environmentally sensitive option available for their project. Visit: https://mdfosb.com/en/
    Oct 30, 2017 0
  • 20 Oct 2017
    As we drive the performance of our building stock, it is becoming clear that one of the key challenges we must address is narrowing the gap between design and actual performance. The industry needs support to ensure we use more accurate modelling and data in order to understand how the building will perform in operation. If we don’t, the gap in performance can be as big as 200-450% greater than predicted. With project costs squeezed and ‘value engineered’, all too often performance suffers. By allowing design teams more time to spend on modelling and considering how the building will be used by its occupants, rather than being forced into ‘default values’ and specification, we will go some of the way to eliminating this performance gap. Understanding the gap The performance gap has two components: the compliance gap and the actual performance gap. The modellers estimate 50-70% is the compliance gap and can be solved by more realistic modelling mirroring the conditions more closely. The reasons for the second and larger actual performance gap are generally unknown. There’s speculation about this and assumptions, but little in the way of hard evidence. When a building is managed effectively, property value is maximised. A high performing building will ultimately generate maximum profit via high and continuous rental income, low operating and maintenance costs and low depreciation. Modelling tools are used for compliance, which means they use standard default values for the building design. All the operational plant which controls the building is then set at these ‘standardised driving’ conditions and the occupancy density (i.e people versus square metres) is based on industry averages. As a result these standard default values underestimate the usage by up to 100%. Software is used to meet building regulations and energy performance certificates, as well as being used for ranking rather than the operation of the building. When you pass the design stage, it’s essential that real numbers are inputted and this can be done via modelling techniques such as the Green Deal software developed by BRE. This allows users to tailor the usage of the building to match real operating conditions in. It allows you to work out what it should and shouldn’t be.  But from that point onwards much depends on how well the building is commissioned; what maintenance strategies and schedules are put into place; and how the building is managed. If this doesn’t happen you begin to see divergence. Buildings need to be commissioned properly with particular attention made to control systems and the needs of the occupants.  The power of management Building management systems (BMSs) and building energy management systems (BEMSs) are powerful tools in ensuring that buildings are run efficiently and provide the desired environment for the occupants. As technology becomes cheaper and advances more rapidly, control systems need to be flexible, upgradable and have the facility to easily communicate and integrate with other systems. However, care needs to be taken in their operation, and staff using these systems need to be fully trained. Ongoing commissioning and preventative maintenance needs to be carried out to ensure the potentially large energy savings are realised, operational costs are controlled and expensive failures do not occur. End-user needs should be taken into account, while staff training and awareness-raising should be carried out to get the building’s occupants involved. Ongoing commissioning is essentially a higher form of maintenance. Maintenance simply deals with faults. It’s also important to consider management issues. Is the right environment being provided? Is it being provided in the proper place? Is the building being turned off at the right times? If it is not managed properly, the performance gap will only get worse. Modelling doesn’t help with the building in-use but baselines the building predicted performance. It starts by putting decent controls in so things are turned off when they are not occupied. Once you have control of the building, you can put the management systems in place so that building is optimised for energy usage.  Focus on people One of the most important things to remember is that a building is built for the occupant. In terms of costs, staffing is around 95% and workplaces are key to productivity. Any reduction in productivity has a large effect on a business’s bottom line; after all 95% of operational costs are the staff. Buildings therefore need to be efficient, responsive and innovative, which is why it is so important to optimise the environment in first place.   It’s imperative that the industry treats the underlying causes not the symptoms. It’s like the heart problem analogy. A surgeon might repair a damaged heart with a stem cell but not treat the inherent diet and lifestyle issues. One of the main problems is that architects are not bringing the design teams early enough in the design process. The later you do this, the more expensive it gets and reduces the benefits in the long term. By engaging with the performance gap, it’s possible to deliver the triple bottom line of people, planet and profit. By Dr Andy Lewry, Principal Technical Consultant, BRE Global Visit: www.breeam.com
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • As we drive the performance of our building stock, it is becoming clear that one of the key challenges we must address is narrowing the gap between design and actual performance. The industry needs support to ensure we use more accurate modelling and data in order to understand how the building will perform in operation. If we don’t, the gap in performance can be as big as 200-450% greater than predicted. With project costs squeezed and ‘value engineered’, all too often performance suffers. By allowing design teams more time to spend on modelling and considering how the building will be used by its occupants, rather than being forced into ‘default values’ and specification, we will go some of the way to eliminating this performance gap. Understanding the gap The performance gap has two components: the compliance gap and the actual performance gap. The modellers estimate 50-70% is the compliance gap and can be solved by more realistic modelling mirroring the conditions more closely. The reasons for the second and larger actual performance gap are generally unknown. There’s speculation about this and assumptions, but little in the way of hard evidence. When a building is managed effectively, property value is maximised. A high performing building will ultimately generate maximum profit via high and continuous rental income, low operating and maintenance costs and low depreciation. Modelling tools are used for compliance, which means they use standard default values for the building design. All the operational plant which controls the building is then set at these ‘standardised driving’ conditions and the occupancy density (i.e people versus square metres) is based on industry averages. As a result these standard default values underestimate the usage by up to 100%. Software is used to meet building regulations and energy performance certificates, as well as being used for ranking rather than the operation of the building. When you pass the design stage, it’s essential that real numbers are inputted and this can be done via modelling techniques such as the Green Deal software developed by BRE. This allows users to tailor the usage of the building to match real operating conditions in. It allows you to work out what it should and shouldn’t be.  But from that point onwards much depends on how well the building is commissioned; what maintenance strategies and schedules are put into place; and how the building is managed. If this doesn’t happen you begin to see divergence. Buildings need to be commissioned properly with particular attention made to control systems and the needs of the occupants.  The power of management Building management systems (BMSs) and building energy management systems (BEMSs) are powerful tools in ensuring that buildings are run efficiently and provide the desired environment for the occupants. As technology becomes cheaper and advances more rapidly, control systems need to be flexible, upgradable and have the facility to easily communicate and integrate with other systems. However, care needs to be taken in their operation, and staff using these systems need to be fully trained. Ongoing commissioning and preventative maintenance needs to be carried out to ensure the potentially large energy savings are realised, operational costs are controlled and expensive failures do not occur. End-user needs should be taken into account, while staff training and awareness-raising should be carried out to get the building’s occupants involved. Ongoing commissioning is essentially a higher form of maintenance. Maintenance simply deals with faults. It’s also important to consider management issues. Is the right environment being provided? Is it being provided in the proper place? Is the building being turned off at the right times? If it is not managed properly, the performance gap will only get worse. Modelling doesn’t help with the building in-use but baselines the building predicted performance. It starts by putting decent controls in so things are turned off when they are not occupied. Once you have control of the building, you can put the management systems in place so that building is optimised for energy usage.  Focus on people One of the most important things to remember is that a building is built for the occupant. In terms of costs, staffing is around 95% and workplaces are key to productivity. Any reduction in productivity has a large effect on a business’s bottom line; after all 95% of operational costs are the staff. Buildings therefore need to be efficient, responsive and innovative, which is why it is so important to optimise the environment in first place.   It’s imperative that the industry treats the underlying causes not the symptoms. It’s like the heart problem analogy. A surgeon might repair a damaged heart with a stem cell but not treat the inherent diet and lifestyle issues. One of the main problems is that architects are not bringing the design teams early enough in the design process. The later you do this, the more expensive it gets and reduces the benefits in the long term. By engaging with the performance gap, it’s possible to deliver the triple bottom line of people, planet and profit. By Dr Andy Lewry, Principal Technical Consultant, BRE Global Visit: www.breeam.com
    Oct 20, 2017 0
  • 10 Sep 2017
    According to number of recent reports, the UK construction industry will need some 400,000 new workers every year until 2021 to meet the demand for new building projects. If the figures are correct then it is going to be a tough call, which in turn means looking at alternative methods of construction. Fortunately we have a thriving industry in the UK for building offsite and most experts reckon that this will be the answer if the building industry is to prosper in the future. Recent surveys in America, where they are facing similar skills shortages, revealed that the amount of project work using off site prefabrication almost tripled between 2010 and 2016 and it is a similar story here. In the UK, Your Housing Group has recently signed a £2.5bn joint venture with a Chinese state-owned construction company to build 25,000 modular homes over the next five years. The housing association currently manages 33,000 affordable homes across the North West, Yorkshire and the Midlands, The 38,000 sq metres of office space at the new Hinckley Power Station in Somerset will be the largest modular project in the UK and will house all the management and technical personnel required during the construction stage of the project. Part of the buildings will be converted after the construction cycle to remain as high quality offices for the permanent site. UK-based design consultancy Arup and bridge specialist Mabey have recently announced that they have delivered the world’s first modular, rapid-assembly glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bridge. The bridge was installed at a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for Network Rail in Oxford. The bridge modules were light enough to be transported by an articulated lorry and then assembled on site and lifted from a distance. Offsite pre fabrication succeeds as you need fewer experienced crafts people to supervise the less experienced. It has the double advantage that components can be constructed at a lower cost before being shipped to site for final installation. It means that construction workers can be recruited from other industries, thus reducing the skills shortages, helping to increase productivity and reduce waste. The assembly line practices of prefabrication make offsite construction the perfect solution for contractors looking to reduce their dependence on skilled labour. So if the pundits are right then modular offsite construction is set to boom – solving our acute skills shortage at the same time - bring it on. By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • According to number of recent reports, the UK construction industry will need some 400,000 new workers every year until 2021 to meet the demand for new building projects. If the figures are correct then it is going to be a tough call, which in turn means looking at alternative methods of construction. Fortunately we have a thriving industry in the UK for building offsite and most experts reckon that this will be the answer if the building industry is to prosper in the future. Recent surveys in America, where they are facing similar skills shortages, revealed that the amount of project work using off site prefabrication almost tripled between 2010 and 2016 and it is a similar story here. In the UK, Your Housing Group has recently signed a £2.5bn joint venture with a Chinese state-owned construction company to build 25,000 modular homes over the next five years. The housing association currently manages 33,000 affordable homes across the North West, Yorkshire and the Midlands, The 38,000 sq metres of office space at the new Hinckley Power Station in Somerset will be the largest modular project in the UK and will house all the management and technical personnel required during the construction stage of the project. Part of the buildings will be converted after the construction cycle to remain as high quality offices for the permanent site. UK-based design consultancy Arup and bridge specialist Mabey have recently announced that they have delivered the world’s first modular, rapid-assembly glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bridge. The bridge was installed at a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for Network Rail in Oxford. The bridge modules were light enough to be transported by an articulated lorry and then assembled on site and lifted from a distance. Offsite pre fabrication succeeds as you need fewer experienced crafts people to supervise the less experienced. It has the double advantage that components can be constructed at a lower cost before being shipped to site for final installation. It means that construction workers can be recruited from other industries, thus reducing the skills shortages, helping to increase productivity and reduce waste. The assembly line practices of prefabrication make offsite construction the perfect solution for contractors looking to reduce their dependence on skilled labour. So if the pundits are right then modular offsite construction is set to boom – solving our acute skills shortage at the same time - bring it on. By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99
    Sep 10, 2017 0
  • 07 Sep 2017
    Forget about any preconceived ideas you might have about gender – the fact is – we need more women to work in the construction industry. We have massive skills shortages which are getting worse as more people leave the industry without being replaced. Fortunately women are embracing the construction challenge and making a significant difference. We have seen the fairly recent formation of Women in Roofing, “an organisation founded to collaborate with all aspects of the roofing industry to achieve diversity and longevity.” With the help of this group, the industry is listening and women are playing a more important role in every area of the supply chain. This week we have also seen the first Inspire Women in UK Construction, Property and Engineering summit, sponsored by builders merchant Travis Perkins, which took place in Manchester. To quote the publicity material - the Inspire Summit highlights women working in the UK construction, engineering and housing sectors that are bucking the trend, reshaping expectations and inspiring others to follow in their footsteps. The event attracted construction professionals to hear about the contribution that women in these sectors make on a daily basis. All this is long overdue as we set about addressing the massive talent gap within the construction industry. We in the UK are going to need some 400,000 new people every year for at least the next five years if we are to prosper as an industry. Then situation is very much the same worldwide. In America it has been estimated that some 2.5 million skilled workers were lost forever from the construction business following the financial collapse in 2008. However, in 2015 women filled nearly 6.3% of apprentice positions in the state of Massachusetts — up from 4.2% in 2012. Women also accounted for 5% of construction work hours in Boston in 2015. This seems to be typical of what is happening across all of America and we are seeing similar stories in Australia and New Zealand. Many traditionalists might not welcome the trend mainly because they still wrongly believe that women are not physically as strong or might not be suited to the rigours of a modern building site This is patent nonsense with several studies showing that women in construction provide a wider pool of opinions and experiences and problem solving. There is also clear evidence that women offer improved decision making, calmer heads and better communication and are less inclined to take dangerous risks – vital with increasing health and safety legislation on construction sites. It does seem incredible that we are still having this debate in 2017 but hopefully – not for much longer. Let’s stop the talking now and start training and recruiting before it’s too late. By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter  @JohnRidgeway99
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Forget about any preconceived ideas you might have about gender – the fact is – we need more women to work in the construction industry. We have massive skills shortages which are getting worse as more people leave the industry without being replaced. Fortunately women are embracing the construction challenge and making a significant difference. We have seen the fairly recent formation of Women in Roofing, “an organisation founded to collaborate with all aspects of the roofing industry to achieve diversity and longevity.” With the help of this group, the industry is listening and women are playing a more important role in every area of the supply chain. This week we have also seen the first Inspire Women in UK Construction, Property and Engineering summit, sponsored by builders merchant Travis Perkins, which took place in Manchester. To quote the publicity material - the Inspire Summit highlights women working in the UK construction, engineering and housing sectors that are bucking the trend, reshaping expectations and inspiring others to follow in their footsteps. The event attracted construction professionals to hear about the contribution that women in these sectors make on a daily basis. All this is long overdue as we set about addressing the massive talent gap within the construction industry. We in the UK are going to need some 400,000 new people every year for at least the next five years if we are to prosper as an industry. Then situation is very much the same worldwide. In America it has been estimated that some 2.5 million skilled workers were lost forever from the construction business following the financial collapse in 2008. However, in 2015 women filled nearly 6.3% of apprentice positions in the state of Massachusetts — up from 4.2% in 2012. Women also accounted for 5% of construction work hours in Boston in 2015. This seems to be typical of what is happening across all of America and we are seeing similar stories in Australia and New Zealand. Many traditionalists might not welcome the trend mainly because they still wrongly believe that women are not physically as strong or might not be suited to the rigours of a modern building site This is patent nonsense with several studies showing that women in construction provide a wider pool of opinions and experiences and problem solving. There is also clear evidence that women offer improved decision making, calmer heads and better communication and are less inclined to take dangerous risks – vital with increasing health and safety legislation on construction sites. It does seem incredible that we are still having this debate in 2017 but hopefully – not for much longer. Let’s stop the talking now and start training and recruiting before it’s too late. By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter  @JohnRidgeway99
    Sep 07, 2017 0
  • 04 Sep 2017
    The construction industry has been experimenting with 3D printers since they were first invented in the 1980’s but in recent years as they have become less expensive, this technology is showing that it might well make a real contribution to buildings of the future. The technology can already be used to create construction components or to 'print' entire buildings and because of our detailed and stringent design processes our industry is well-suited to 3D printing as much of the information necessary to create components already exists. More recently, with the introduction of BIM modelling, we may well see this process being accelerated. A 3D digital model of a product or component can be created using CAD or a 3D scanner. The printer then reads that design and lays down successive layers of printing medium which are joined or fused to create the end component. There are many examples of successful 3D projects allied to construction. In 2014, engineers at Arup fabricated a sreel node for a lightweight structure and the University of California has developed a process of contour crafting using concrete to produce small-scale models of the external and internal wallos. According to sources from the BBC, Shanghai based WinSun Decoration Design Engineering has used large 3D printers to spray a mixture of quick drying cement and recycled raw materials which has enabled them to construct 10 small demonstration 'houses' in less than 24 hours. They are encouraged by the fact that each house costs just $5,000 dollar a time using this technology. Construction Manager Magazine reported in July 2014 that a Chinese company, Qingdao Unique Products had unveiled the World's largest 3D printer. Its first job was to print a 7m high Temple of Heaven. In Spain, the first pedestrian bridge printed in 3D in the world was inaugurated 14th of December of 2016 in the urban park of Castilla-La Mancha in Alcobendas, Madrid.  The bridge has a total length of 12 metres and a width of 1.75 metres and is printed in micro- reinforced concrete.  What all of these projects have in common is the potential for enormous cost savings with faster building times and fewer hours on site being an enormous attraction for an industry obsessed by price and it’s almost certain that 3D will carve out an enormous niche for itself in the market place. On the negative side, it will require enormous investment in specialist machinery and while we can still see a growing trend towards off site production, which is well suited to 3D this writer believes we still have a long way to go. So for the moment, traditional building materials are not under threat – or are they? By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The construction industry has been experimenting with 3D printers since they were first invented in the 1980’s but in recent years as they have become less expensive, this technology is showing that it might well make a real contribution to buildings of the future. The technology can already be used to create construction components or to 'print' entire buildings and because of our detailed and stringent design processes our industry is well-suited to 3D printing as much of the information necessary to create components already exists. More recently, with the introduction of BIM modelling, we may well see this process being accelerated. A 3D digital model of a product or component can be created using CAD or a 3D scanner. The printer then reads that design and lays down successive layers of printing medium which are joined or fused to create the end component. There are many examples of successful 3D projects allied to construction. In 2014, engineers at Arup fabricated a sreel node for a lightweight structure and the University of California has developed a process of contour crafting using concrete to produce small-scale models of the external and internal wallos. According to sources from the BBC, Shanghai based WinSun Decoration Design Engineering has used large 3D printers to spray a mixture of quick drying cement and recycled raw materials which has enabled them to construct 10 small demonstration 'houses' in less than 24 hours. They are encouraged by the fact that each house costs just $5,000 dollar a time using this technology. Construction Manager Magazine reported in July 2014 that a Chinese company, Qingdao Unique Products had unveiled the World's largest 3D printer. Its first job was to print a 7m high Temple of Heaven. In Spain, the first pedestrian bridge printed in 3D in the world was inaugurated 14th of December of 2016 in the urban park of Castilla-La Mancha in Alcobendas, Madrid.  The bridge has a total length of 12 metres and a width of 1.75 metres and is printed in micro- reinforced concrete.  What all of these projects have in common is the potential for enormous cost savings with faster building times and fewer hours on site being an enormous attraction for an industry obsessed by price and it’s almost certain that 3D will carve out an enormous niche for itself in the market place. On the negative side, it will require enormous investment in specialist machinery and while we can still see a growing trend towards off site production, which is well suited to 3D this writer believes we still have a long way to go. So for the moment, traditional building materials are not under threat – or are they? By John Ridgeway Follow me on Twitter @JohnRidgeway99
    Sep 04, 2017 0
  • 31 Aug 2017
    The headline says it all - and it particularly applies to the construction industry; especially when it comes to our small corner of it, the resin bound permeable paving market. We are not afraid to tell you that we sometimes lose out to competitors quoting up to 20% cheaper than us. “What?” I hear you say “Some of your competitors are 20% cheaper than you and you are admitting it?”  Yes we are and for a very, very good reason… All too often we hear from customers who, having previously bought a cheaper product, ask us to rectify problems associated with inferior resin bound paving. Knowing that the basic requirement of every company is to make a profit, we can rule out companies doing too many jobs ‘out of the kindness of their heart’ or free of charge.  So, with only a limited number of ways to make one resin bound product cheaper than another, and ruling out profit as the major difference, the only other ways are: Cheaper resins Everyone in the industry knows that the resin used (very unsurprisingly) within resin bound paving is the single most crucial factor in determining whether your product is average or great.  Although the quality, cleanliness and consistency of the stone is vitally important, what really differentiates material suppliers is the quality of the resin binder used. There are many ‘tunes’ which can be played with the resin including using different types of vastly differing qualities and altering the formulation percentages to make products stronger or weaker.   Obviously less resin equals cheaper, and I seriously doubt anyone would be surprised that cheaper equals weaker. At SureSet we only use high quality resins, in the correct formulas, ensuring that the durability of our product is top of the agenda. Poor mix design Not investing in technical expertise is another way of reducing cost. Every blend we create at SureSet is tested using a process we have developed over 18 years.  We know that each type and size of individual aggregate has different characteristics, which means that some types of aggregate require different amounts of resin than others. I have heard many companies say “just dump this 7kg resin on top of any 100kg of dry stone and away you go”, but the reality is producing high quality, long lasting products is a far more technical process than that. This completely rules out the ‘one size fits all’ theory, yet there are many well established companies who are still doing just that. Hand in hand with good design is the need to manage quality so that the product produced is consistent and meets required standards.  Customers should look for suppliers who demonstrate this by achieving and maintaining national standards, such as ISO 9001 and Investors in People. Total quantity of material used There are some companies who, to keep the cost of a job low, will install the material at less than optimal depths, regardless of its end use.  When buying resin bound paving you should make sure that each quote has the same specification; if one company is stating a 20mm depth, and the other a 16mm depth, ask both companies why.  The likelihood is that the company stating 20mm will have done so due to turning vehicles, large vehicles or heavier usage etc.  The 20mm material will last longer, and withstand its intended use.  Let’s not forget the company stating 20mm also wants to be as competitive as possible, so it does not make commercial sense to state a greater depth, and therefore increased cost, than is necessary.  If 16mm will do the job, then 16mm would have been quoted for. Poor workmanship Labour costs are also a significant factor when determining the selling point of resin bound paving, both in having the necessary skills, and having enough labour on site. Our experience allows us to precisely assess how many installers are needed to install a particular job and enables us to price accurately.  A mistake commonly made is in thinking that three installers can do the job of five… In theory they probably could, but will the quality and attention to detail be the same if your surface were laid by five skilled installers? The simple answer is no.  If we at SureSet took that approach, whilst our quote would be more competitive and our profit margin increase, the reality is that the installation would be rushed and shortcuts taken. We do everything in our power to avoid under-estimating the time needed for each installation - at the end of the day you are ‘only as good as your last job’. In short there would be no time to walk that ‘extra mile’ and deliver the high quality associated with SureSet.  To summarise Throughout the 18 years SureSet has been manufacturing, supplying and installing permeable resin bound paving, we have been called upon to rectify poor installations. Some can be repaired, while others require complete replacement. Unfortunately for the customer, the original cheap price is no longer the bargain they originally thought it was. When buying resin bound paving I urge you not to buy on price, but consider these points when making your decision: Value – don’t just consider the upfront cost, but the whole life investment into the quality of the product. Remember you can only make cheap resin bound paving by compromising the quality of the end product. Quality– a product that has been well designed, researched and invested in will look better and last longer. Reputation – read testimonials, ask to see installations near you or speak to customers before purchasing.  ‘Word of mouth’ still goes a long way. Guarantee – established companies offering long guarantees offer them for a reason. Likewise companies offering a short guarantee also do so for a reason. Although we would love to, we don’t expect to win every tender we submit - it is not feasible or conducive to a healthy market. However when we lose out to an inferior, cheaper product is frustrating because we know that at some point in the future the customer, who thought they were choosing between ‘like for like’ products will be disappointed with their decision.  Not only was this a loss to SureSet, but more worryingly it could be a loss to the resin bound paving market.  So as the title of my blog suggests: Please, please don’t purchase purely on price, purchase on value. Author: Ben Shave, Sales Director, SureSet UK Ltd. Visit: https://www.sureset.co.uk/ Follow Us: https://www.facebook.com/suresetuk/ https://twitter.com/SureSetUK https://www.youtube.com/user/SureSetUK15 https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1220581/  
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • The headline says it all - and it particularly applies to the construction industry; especially when it comes to our small corner of it, the resin bound permeable paving market. We are not afraid to tell you that we sometimes lose out to competitors quoting up to 20% cheaper than us. “What?” I hear you say “Some of your competitors are 20% cheaper than you and you are admitting it?”  Yes we are and for a very, very good reason… All too often we hear from customers who, having previously bought a cheaper product, ask us to rectify problems associated with inferior resin bound paving. Knowing that the basic requirement of every company is to make a profit, we can rule out companies doing too many jobs ‘out of the kindness of their heart’ or free of charge.  So, with only a limited number of ways to make one resin bound product cheaper than another, and ruling out profit as the major difference, the only other ways are: Cheaper resins Everyone in the industry knows that the resin used (very unsurprisingly) within resin bound paving is the single most crucial factor in determining whether your product is average or great.  Although the quality, cleanliness and consistency of the stone is vitally important, what really differentiates material suppliers is the quality of the resin binder used. There are many ‘tunes’ which can be played with the resin including using different types of vastly differing qualities and altering the formulation percentages to make products stronger or weaker.   Obviously less resin equals cheaper, and I seriously doubt anyone would be surprised that cheaper equals weaker. At SureSet we only use high quality resins, in the correct formulas, ensuring that the durability of our product is top of the agenda. Poor mix design Not investing in technical expertise is another way of reducing cost. Every blend we create at SureSet is tested using a process we have developed over 18 years.  We know that each type and size of individual aggregate has different characteristics, which means that some types of aggregate require different amounts of resin than others. I have heard many companies say “just dump this 7kg resin on top of any 100kg of dry stone and away you go”, but the reality is producing high quality, long lasting products is a far more technical process than that. This completely rules out the ‘one size fits all’ theory, yet there are many well established companies who are still doing just that. Hand in hand with good design is the need to manage quality so that the product produced is consistent and meets required standards.  Customers should look for suppliers who demonstrate this by achieving and maintaining national standards, such as ISO 9001 and Investors in People. Total quantity of material used There are some companies who, to keep the cost of a job low, will install the material at less than optimal depths, regardless of its end use.  When buying resin bound paving you should make sure that each quote has the same specification; if one company is stating a 20mm depth, and the other a 16mm depth, ask both companies why.  The likelihood is that the company stating 20mm will have done so due to turning vehicles, large vehicles or heavier usage etc.  The 20mm material will last longer, and withstand its intended use.  Let’s not forget the company stating 20mm also wants to be as competitive as possible, so it does not make commercial sense to state a greater depth, and therefore increased cost, than is necessary.  If 16mm will do the job, then 16mm would have been quoted for. Poor workmanship Labour costs are also a significant factor when determining the selling point of resin bound paving, both in having the necessary skills, and having enough labour on site. Our experience allows us to precisely assess how many installers are needed to install a particular job and enables us to price accurately.  A mistake commonly made is in thinking that three installers can do the job of five… In theory they probably could, but will the quality and attention to detail be the same if your surface were laid by five skilled installers? The simple answer is no.  If we at SureSet took that approach, whilst our quote would be more competitive and our profit margin increase, the reality is that the installation would be rushed and shortcuts taken. We do everything in our power to avoid under-estimating the time needed for each installation - at the end of the day you are ‘only as good as your last job’. In short there would be no time to walk that ‘extra mile’ and deliver the high quality associated with SureSet.  To summarise Throughout the 18 years SureSet has been manufacturing, supplying and installing permeable resin bound paving, we have been called upon to rectify poor installations. Some can be repaired, while others require complete replacement. Unfortunately for the customer, the original cheap price is no longer the bargain they originally thought it was. When buying resin bound paving I urge you not to buy on price, but consider these points when making your decision: Value – don’t just consider the upfront cost, but the whole life investment into the quality of the product. Remember you can only make cheap resin bound paving by compromising the quality of the end product. Quality– a product that has been well designed, researched and invested in will look better and last longer. Reputation – read testimonials, ask to see installations near you or speak to customers before purchasing.  ‘Word of mouth’ still goes a long way. Guarantee – established companies offering long guarantees offer them for a reason. Likewise companies offering a short guarantee also do so for a reason. Although we would love to, we don’t expect to win every tender we submit - it is not feasible or conducive to a healthy market. However when we lose out to an inferior, cheaper product is frustrating because we know that at some point in the future the customer, who thought they were choosing between ‘like for like’ products will be disappointed with their decision.  Not only was this a loss to SureSet, but more worryingly it could be a loss to the resin bound paving market.  So as the title of my blog suggests: Please, please don’t purchase purely on price, purchase on value. Author: Ben Shave, Sales Director, SureSet UK Ltd. Visit: https://www.sureset.co.uk/ Follow Us: https://www.facebook.com/suresetuk/ https://twitter.com/SureSetUK https://www.youtube.com/user/SureSetUK15 https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1220581/  
    Aug 31, 2017 0
  • 30 Aug 2017
    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if everything we hoped to achieve in life went according to plan? If every car we bought lived-up to its showroom tag of being a ‘good, reliable, runner’; if every holiday destination was as idyllic and desirable as it appeared in the brochure; if every day at the office was as productive and rewarding as we convinced ourselves it would be when we arrived at 9am. The harsh reality is, however, no matter how diligently we prepare for the best possible outcome in any given situation, events, sometimes beyond our control, cause our best-laid plans to go awry. Poured concrete installation, a vital process in the construction of new buildings, roads and other critical infrastructure, doesn’t always run smoothly. From the presence of small pin-holes due to water damage, to low cover of concrete by insufficient material quantity; there are a number of defects that can be caused by on-site application error or environmental factors. When such issues occur, the availability of quick and easy-to-use products is key to addressing failings and returning a project to its correct course. In Sika, the construction industry has a manufacturer which can be relied upon to supply the right product for the right repair.  Concrete issues Before we consider the solutions, let’s examine the problems that can arise during poured concrete installation. The aforementioned surface pin-holing or honeycombing can occur due to insufficient aggregate in the original pour, leading to a less-than smooth finish. Voids, or small chasms in concrete are another potential issue. Incorrect application of a release agent, water or air can lead to this issue, resulting in a surface that appears damaged or cracked. Shutter removal in freshly-poured concrete can be damaging, as can rainwater landing on recently cast slag, leading to an uneven and imperfect slab. There is potential for cracking in concrete when there’s excess water in the poured mix, or rapid drying takes place. In places of high traffic, damaged edges can occur, whilst incorrect placement of the formwork or damage to the original cover is a cause of low concrete cover. A lack of steel strengthening in the original build can also weaken a concrete installation over time. In all the above instances repairs need to be quick, effective and make the poured concrete look as good as new. Sika has a wide range of proven concrete repair solutions for a wide range of issues. These include: Surface pin-holing: Sika® MonoTop®-620 Honeycombing: Sika® MonoTop®-615, Sika® MonoTop®-614F Shutter damage: Sika® MonoTop®-620 Spalled -Small areas: Sika® Monotop®-612, Sika® Monotop®-615, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Spalled – Large areas: Sikacem® 133S Gunite, Sikacem® 133F Gunite Cracking: Sikadur®-31, Sikadur®-52  Damaged edges: Sikadur®-41, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Low Concrete Cover: Sika® Ferrogard®-903+, Sika® MonoTop®-610, Sika® MonoTop®-615, Sika® MonoTop®-612, Sika® MonoTop®-614F, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Rain Damaged Slab: Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar, Sika® MonoTop®-614F Sika® Screed Hardtop- 60 Errors of judgement are a fact of life and some are more costly than others, particularly on-site. It’s how we react to these indiscretions that count, and in the construction industry it often requires a response that is as rapid as it is effective to prevent seemingly minor issues creating obstacles to a building project’s long-term stability. Make no mistake, whatever the issue; Sika has a proven, quality concrete repair solution. By Charles Pierce, National Sales Manager – Technical Manager Refurbishment, Sika Visit:  www.sika.co.uk
    0 Posted by Talk. Build
  • Wouldn’t it be wonderful if everything we hoped to achieve in life went according to plan? If every car we bought lived-up to its showroom tag of being a ‘good, reliable, runner’; if every holiday destination was as idyllic and desirable as it appeared in the brochure; if every day at the office was as productive and rewarding as we convinced ourselves it would be when we arrived at 9am. The harsh reality is, however, no matter how diligently we prepare for the best possible outcome in any given situation, events, sometimes beyond our control, cause our best-laid plans to go awry. Poured concrete installation, a vital process in the construction of new buildings, roads and other critical infrastructure, doesn’t always run smoothly. From the presence of small pin-holes due to water damage, to low cover of concrete by insufficient material quantity; there are a number of defects that can be caused by on-site application error or environmental factors. When such issues occur, the availability of quick and easy-to-use products is key to addressing failings and returning a project to its correct course. In Sika, the construction industry has a manufacturer which can be relied upon to supply the right product for the right repair.  Concrete issues Before we consider the solutions, let’s examine the problems that can arise during poured concrete installation. The aforementioned surface pin-holing or honeycombing can occur due to insufficient aggregate in the original pour, leading to a less-than smooth finish. Voids, or small chasms in concrete are another potential issue. Incorrect application of a release agent, water or air can lead to this issue, resulting in a surface that appears damaged or cracked. Shutter removal in freshly-poured concrete can be damaging, as can rainwater landing on recently cast slag, leading to an uneven and imperfect slab. There is potential for cracking in concrete when there’s excess water in the poured mix, or rapid drying takes place. In places of high traffic, damaged edges can occur, whilst incorrect placement of the formwork or damage to the original cover is a cause of low concrete cover. A lack of steel strengthening in the original build can also weaken a concrete installation over time. In all the above instances repairs need to be quick, effective and make the poured concrete look as good as new. Sika has a wide range of proven concrete repair solutions for a wide range of issues. These include: Surface pin-holing: Sika® MonoTop®-620 Honeycombing: Sika® MonoTop®-615, Sika® MonoTop®-614F Shutter damage: Sika® MonoTop®-620 Spalled -Small areas: Sika® Monotop®-612, Sika® Monotop®-615, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Spalled – Large areas: Sikacem® 133S Gunite, Sikacem® 133F Gunite Cracking: Sikadur®-31, Sikadur®-52  Damaged edges: Sikadur®-41, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Low Concrete Cover: Sika® Ferrogard®-903+, Sika® MonoTop®-610, Sika® MonoTop®-615, Sika® MonoTop®-612, Sika® MonoTop®-614F, Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar Rain Damaged Slab: Sika® Rapid Repair Mortar, Sika® MonoTop®-614F Sika® Screed Hardtop- 60 Errors of judgement are a fact of life and some are more costly than others, particularly on-site. It’s how we react to these indiscretions that count, and in the construction industry it often requires a response that is as rapid as it is effective to prevent seemingly minor issues creating obstacles to a building project’s long-term stability. Make no mistake, whatever the issue; Sika has a proven, quality concrete repair solution. By Charles Pierce, National Sales Manager – Technical Manager Refurbishment, Sika Visit:  www.sika.co.uk
    Aug 30, 2017 0